Printer Friendly

FEDERAL AGENCY URGES MORE STATE PARTICIPATION IN EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION SYSTEM; OFFICIALS MEET IN TAMPA AS HURRICANE SEASON LOOMS

 ATLANTA, May 28 /PRNewswire/ -- Following a year of deadly and devastating storms in states extending from the Gulf of Mexico through New England, the Federal Emergency Management Agency is urging more state and local governments to participate in the Emergency Information Notification System it instituted in 1990 to improve community readiness and response to disasters.
 Established in the aftermath of Hurricane Hugo, EINS was conceived by FEMA and The Weather Channel cable TV network to help speed and localize distribution of emergency notices, which by law must be issued by state or community officials. EINS allows officials to televise their advisories and warnings on The Weather Channel within minutes of being issued and to repeat them at least every five minutes until canceled or updated. Using technology unique to The Weather Channel, it also televises notices, such as flood warnings and evacuation information, on a community-specific basis.
 This week in Tampa FEMA directors are meeting with emergency management officials from 18 Atlantic and Gulf Coast states to urge greater participation in the EINS and provide training on its use. With June 1 marking the start of the Atlantic hurricane season, federal officials are eager for more states to become proficient in EINS procedures, and they also want to encourage the system's use year round.
 "Many southern coastal regions are already on board with EINS, but only for hurricane notification," said Bill Massey, with Atlanta's FEMA office, which has worked closely with The Weather Channel and state emergency agencies in implementing EINS. "We would like to see more widespread use of EINS, and not only for hurricanes. Many people would have benefited from EINS during the 100-year storm in December and the March blizzard."
 Mr. Massey said that the effects of Hurricane Andrew and the severe winter weather would help influence states to utilize EINS. FEMA, however, cannot require that states use the system.
 According to Ray Ban, vice president of operations at The Weather Channel, the network's ability to televise warnings only in affected areas helps ensure a prompt and orderly response to an emergency. "This is a very rapid, precise way of getting out crucial information to the community," he said.
 Mr. Ban said that viewers typically tune into The Weather Channel often and in large numbers when severe storms develop. Viewing of the Weather Channel increased to more than five times its normal level in the hours leading up to Hurricane Andrew's landfall and the Blizzard of '93.
 -0- 5/28/93
 /CONTACT: Richard Roher of Roher Public Relatons, 212-986-6668, for The Weather Channel/


CO: The Weather Channel ST: Georgia IN: ENT SU:

CK-OS -- NY023 -- 3369 05/28/93 11:46 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1993 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1993 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:May 28, 1993
Words:444
Previous Article:PELLA PRODUCTS RECOGNIZED FOR PERFORMANCE LEADERSHIP; NATIONAL FENESTRATION RATING COUNCIL CERTIFIES ENERGY-EFFICIENT PELLA PRODUCTS
Next Article:BANKINTER TO HOLD ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING ON JUNE 22
Topics:


Related Articles
BERWICK NUCLEAR PLAN EXERCISE CANCELLED
National Notification Network (3n) Issues Checklist for Hurricane Season Preparedness.
Tampa Electric Chooses MIR3's inAlertCenter for Emergency and Business Continuity Communications.
NOAA's Hurricane Preparedness Campaign Goes Airborne for Gulf Coast and Florida Residents.
NOAA Concludes Successful Hurricane Awareness Tour.
Maximizing emergency communication.
Hughes Announces Emergency Communications Service Offerings in Preparation for 2006 Hurricane Season.
HISD Leads the Nation in Proactive Preparation.
ALERT FM Platform Now Available in Florida.
Hardest Hit Gulf Coast Areas Continue to Depend on FirstCall to Reach Citizens Who Are Dispersed Due to Hurricane Ike.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2017 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters