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FAMILY VALUES WILL INFLUENCE ARCHITECTURE IN THE '90S

 BIRMINGHAM, Ala., Jan. 14 /PRNewswire/ -- The phrase "family values" has been turning up everywhere, and now it's even making its mark on architecture. In the fast-paced, high-pressure society of the '90s, people have come to see their homes as invaluable refuges and sources of family unity.
 Southern Living magazine, which features winners of the annual Southern Home Awards in its February issue, spent weeks looking at entries and talking with some of the South's premier architects. What the editors discovered is that along with this growing emphasis on traditional values is a renewed interest in traditional architecture.
 "In the '80s, there was perhaps more of a tendency to view the home as a showplace," said Southern Living Editor John Floyd. "But what we're seeing in the '90s is a trend toward openness and informality. Of course, people still want beautiful homes, but they want beauty that makes sense. You can expect to see more small homes with large, multi- purpose rooms; traditional architectural styles that create an atmosphere of warmth and accessibility; and more attention to landscaping and environmental concerns."
 The Southern Home Award winners reflect that trend. Take, for example, the Wintergreen, Va., vacation home of Ned and Carol Martin. "We like to vacation together as a family," Mrs. Martin explained. "But with six children between the ages of 26 and 3, we wanted a magnet to bring the older ones together and a fun place for the younger children, too."
 Architect Heather Willson Cass helped the Martins create a handsome family retreat that takes full advantage of its mountain setting. There are no walls or dividers in the main living/kitchen area. Even the kitchen has a mountain view. Bridges and decks not only add rustic beauty, but also connect the different levels of the house and provide additional storage and recreational space outdoors.
 Family needs also were a key concern of Ben and Beverly Weathers of Augusta, Ga. The Weatherses purchased the Benjamin Hall House (circa 1868) in 1989 and worked with architect Al Cheatham on the two-year restoration project. They took great pains to restore the house to its original beauty. However, they also blended modern architectural changes, such as a 1,250-square-foot basement.
 While the floor plans of their winning homes accommodate contemporary lifestyles, the Weathers and Martin families both looked to the past for architectural inspiration. The Martin home derives much of its style from the sheds and bridges of local vernacular architecture. The Weatherses discovered old journals written by the original owners of their home and used that information to help restore the house accurately.
 Other Home Award winners followed similar paths, as Southern Living Homes Editor Louis Joyner explained: "Most of the winners this year, even the new homes, borrow design precedents from the past. They use the architectural vocabulary of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. But the interiors open up for the relaxed, less formal way we like to live today."
 In the turn-of-the-century Washington suburb of Garrett Park, Md., Jeremy and Dee Lichtenstein built a brand-new house -- or did they? The Lichtenstein home is so faithful to the Free Classic style of an earlier era that even visiting architects thought it was a restoration.
 Also faithful to their existing neighborhood were Gary and Mary Richardson of Annapolis, Md. The Richardsons own an attractive but unusually sited 70-year-old home in the Annapolis Historic District. When they decided to add a pool and a privacy wall, expand their living and entertaining options, and renovate their old garage, they contacted architect Jay Huyett and landscape architect Stratton Semmes.
 Huyett and Semmes designed beautiful garden areas, a pool, a new garage and a privacy wall, and they turned the old garage into a pool house. All renovations were carefully planned to blend in with existing architecture and make the most of limited space in a scenic historic neighborhood.
 Both old and new homes can benefit from careful attention to historic details. In Memphis, Tenn., the Harbor View Cottages of Harbor Town, a new development on Mud Island, use simple, historic materials -- both lap and board-and-batten siding and divided light windows -- to lend warmth and charm to small, affordable homes.
 The entire development of Harbor Town recalls a quieter, simpler time. It consists of small neighborhoods, each arranged around a square or park. Sidewalks and tree-lined streets help make this a pedestrian- oriented community. Harbor Town's private street system features period cast iron light fixtures, as well as custom street signs, benches, bike racks, trash cans and mailboxes.
 "Harbor Town, the winning new development, works by breaking down the large, automobile-oriented suburban development into compact, pedestrian-oriented neighborhoods," Joyner said.
 Will every new home in the '90s recall the 19th and early 20th centuries as Harbor Town does? No. Will many of them? Definitely. "I think we'll continue to see richer, more traditional materials, such as granites and multi-layered molding," said Florida architect Steve Feller, who helped judge the Southern Home Awards. "Traditionalism with a classical touch is making a comeback."
 Also judging the 1993 Southern Home Awards were architects Daniel Bennett and Sara O'Neil-Manion and the Southern Living homes editors. Categories for entries were new homes less than 1,800 square feet; new homes 1,800-3,600 square feet; new homes more than 3,200 square feet; additions and remodelings; preservation and restoration; and residential developments.
 The deadline for entry in the 1994 Southern Home Awards is May 31, 1993. For information, send a business-size, self-addressed, stamped envelope to The Southern Home Awards, Southern Living, P.O. Box 523, Birmingham, AL 35201.
 Southern Living is published by Southern Progress Corporation, which also publishes Southern Accents, Progressive Farmer and Cooking Light magazines, as well as Oxmoor House books. The Birmingham, Ala.-based company is the largest regional publisher of magazines and books in the country.
 -0- 1/14/93
 /CONTACT: Valerie Frazer of Southern Progress, 205-877-6000/


CO: Southern Progress Corporation ST: Georgia, Virginia, Maryland, Tennessee IN: PUB SU:

BN-TG -- AT013 -- 4925 01/14/93 13:43 EST
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