Printer Friendly

FAMILIES GET A HOME OF THEIR OWN OLD SCHOOL NOW APARTMENTS.

Byline: Janette Williams Staff Writer

PASADENA - Finally, Matika Pope has a wall of her own to pin up her Student of the Month award, her perfect attendance certificates and good citizenship posters.

The 11-year-old belongs to one of six formerly homeless families who have just moved into new furnished apartments in the historic Euclid Villa on South Euclid Avenue, a joint affordable-housing project between the cities of Pasadena and Glendale.

Matika shares a room in the family's two-bedroom apartment with her sister Monique, 8, in their first real home in two years.

``Have they quarreled about their space yet? Sure they have,'' joked their mother, Mihalika. ``But it's been fine. Better than dealing with moving from place to place. I can come home and have my own place. I can have peace of mind.''

Thursday's grand opening of the $2.5 million project completed a two-building, 14-apartment complex for homeless families with children, part of a two-year transitional housing program to allow parents a chance to get back on their feet.

``I'm absolutely delighted at the way this has turned out,'' said Rabbi Marvin Gross, executive director of Union Station Foundation. ``It's a wonderful thing that all of the many entities (involved) were able to work together to create such a beautiful, positive environment for families in the process of healing.''

The program is funded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the cities of Pasadena and Glendale, the California Equity Fund and others, including private foundations, churches and banks, and numerous community organizations.

Designed to meet the needs of a growing number of homeless families in the Pasadena and Glendale areas, the program offers more than just a place to live, said Lisa Flores, who was on the waiting list for about a year.

To be eligible, low-income families with children must meet the federal definition of homelessness, must show a willingness and ability to work and follow strict rules of conduct, among other conditions.

And to help them along, a full roster of services is available on site, from counseling and help with money management to job training for adults and after-school tutoring for children. A child care and a learning center will soon be set up, and an apartment manager is on site to deal with any problems.

``It's a beautiful apartment, and I'm blessed to be in this program,'' said Flores, who moved into a one-bedroom attic apartment with her 11- year-old daughter, Nicole.

``It's fully furnished, even toiletries and pots and pans - it's a whole, brand-new apartment. They even gave us cleaning supplies,'' said Flores, who will pay $153 a month rent.
COPYRIGHT 2000 Daily News
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2000, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Date:Apr 14, 2000
Words:440
Previous Article:RIORDAN PLEDGES RAMPART CLEANUP MAYOR URGES VALLEY VOTERS NOT TO SECEDE FROM CITY.
Next Article:WATER OFFICIAL DEFENDS WILDLIFE WAYSTATION.


Related Articles
Third generation developer leaves mark on NY's construction scene.
Trend talk. (Industry Insider--In the Loop Business News).
BRIEFLY RESIDENTS ALERTED TO VIDEO PROWLER.
FIRE VICTIMS PICK UP THE PIECES.
NO HOME FOR HOLIDAYS FIRE LEAVES MANY LIVING IN MOTEL.
NEWHALL GIRL, 14, ESCAPES ATTACKER.
SO MANY LIVES CHANGED COURSE AFTER '94 DISASTER.
BLAZE CLAIMS PALMDALE MOTHER'S PRIZED COLLECTIBLES.
BRIEFLY 9 PEOPLE INJURED IN THREE-CAR CRASH.
SCHOOL-HOUSE PROJECT COMES TO FRUITION AFFORDABLE APARTMENTS, CAMPUS ARE COMBINED.

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2018 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters