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FAA ANNOUNCES ACTION TO PREVENT ICE ON AIRCRAFT

 FAA ANNOUNCES ACTION TO PREVENT ICE ON AIRCRAFT
 WASHINGTON, July 21 /PRNewswire/ -- The Federal Aviation


Administration (FAA) today spelled out the action it proposes to take to minimize the risk of accidents caused by snow and ice buildup on the wings of aircraft waiting to take off.
 The agency said that before Oct. 15, it will put into effect a wide range of suggestions made by five panels of experts at the International Conference on Airplane Ground Deicing held on May 28 and 29.
 "The FAA has moved quickly to fulfill the commitment made by Transportation Secretary Andrew Card at the international conference to deal effectively with the deicing problem," FAA Administrator Thomas C. Richards said.
 The most important action is the proposed adoption of a new regulation requiring each airline to have an FAA-approved ground deicing plan in place by next winter. A Notice of Proposed Rulemaking will be published later this week with a 15-day comment period.
 "The proposed rule," said Richards, "would require airlines to provide training for pilots and other personnel on the detection of wing ice and provides for the establishment of limits on how long an airplane can be exposed to snow or freezing rain before it has to be inspected or deiced again."
 The FAA said it also will change operational procedures for controlling the flow of aircraft on the ground to reduce the time aircraft have to wait in line for takeoff after being deiced.
 One way to do this is for the air traffic controllers to tell the crew of an aircraft the time it can expect to be cleared to taxi and take off. Then the crew can wait until just before that time to have the aircraft deiced.
 The agency also will ask the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) to convert its ad hoc committee on aircraft ground deicing to a permanent committee to serve as a continuing international forum for the discussion of ground deicing issues.
 The SAE has long been active in the airplane deicing area and developed a landmark chart showing the length of time an aircraft can safely be exposed to icing conditions under different temperatures and precipitation rates.
 The agency also will encourage the International Aviation Snow Symposium, sponsored by the Northeast Chapter of the American Association of Airport Executives, to actively participate on the committee.
 In addition, the FAA will issue a pocket-sized manual for pilots titled, "A Pilot's Guide to Large Aircraft Ground Deicing," and it will update and re-issue its Winter Operations Guide.
 The agency also will encourage the use of longer-lasting Type II deicing fluid, which is widely used in Europe, is thicker and stays effective longer than Type I. FAA officials said Type II fluid has been reformulated to allay the environmental and operational concerns of the industry.
 The FAA will also make available Airport Improvement Program funds to help finance the construction of deicing pads on taxiways to further reduce the time between deicing and takeoff.
 In the case of snow-belt airports that historically have experienced takeoff delays or have longer than average taxiing distances, the FAA will encourage airport, airline and air traffic control officials to get together and develop a deicing plan tailored to that airport.
 The proposed rule would apply to passenger and cargo operations using large jet aircraft. With regard to air taxis and commuter airlines operating small aircraft, the FAA will continue to monitor winter operations to see if further rulemaking is necessary.
 The FAA will urge the International Civil Aviation Organization to work with civil aviation authorities around the world to adopt similar measures for foreign airlines.
 -0- 7/21/92
 /CONTACT: Fred Farrar of the Federal Aviation Administration, 202-267-8521/ CO: Federal Aviation Administration ST: District of Columbia IN: AIR SU:


KD -- DC014 -- 1294 07/21/92 11:41 EDT
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Date:Jul 21, 1992
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