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Explaining the depiction of violence against women in victorian literature; applying Julia Kristeva's theory of abjection to Dickens, Bronte, and Braddon.

0773459898

Explaining the depiction of violence against women in victorian literature; applying Julia Kristeva's theory of abjection to Dickens, Bronte, and Braddon.

Tatum, Karen E.

Edwin Mellen Pr.

2005

199 pages

$109.95

Hardcover

PR868

Tatum (English, ECPI College of Technology) works through Dickens's Oliver Twist, Bronte's Jane Eyre and Braddon's Aurora Floyd and Lady Audley's Secret as she explores the question of why the female body was so threatening in nineteenth-century fiction. In doing so she also examines critical interpretations which abject the female body in an effort to explain accusations of essentialism which repeat abjection. Using Kristeva's theories about the simultaneous fascination and horror aroused by the image of the mother, Tatum notes these emotions can potentially result in acts of physical violence and makes the case that acts of violence against the female body in the nineteenth century were actually acts of violence against the mother.

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Publication:Reference & Research Book News
Article Type:Book Review
Date:May 1, 2006
Words:156
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