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Evidence Based Education Request Desk. EBE #755.

ERIC Descriptors: College Credits; Evidence; College Programs; Dual Enrollment; Program Evaluation; Philanthropic Foundations; Synthesis; Outcomes of Education; Academic Achievement; Educational Indicators; Educational Research; Annotated Bibliographies; Program Effectiveness; Educational Policy; Federal Programs

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The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation created the Early College High School Initiative in 2002, opening more than 200 hundred early college programs across the nation and every year a new report is created to evaluate the progress of the program (Berger, Adelman, & Cole, 2010). Staff at the Regional Educational Laboratory Southeast (REL-SE) identified the latest synthesis report and other studies that examined secondary school outcomes for early college students. In general, the studies concluded that dual-enrollment students: outperformed district averages on statewide math and ELA assessments; graduated from high school with approximately one year's worth of college credit; and were more likely to graduate from high school and to enroll in college than their non-dual-enrollment counterparts. The reports are summarized in this paper. This paper is a response to a question asking research conducted on students in the early college. An annotated bibliography is included.

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Publication:ERIC: Reports
Date:Nov 1, 2010
Words:251
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