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Equipment in our history.

Name: POA-CWS-H5A (75)

Type: Main armament flamethrower tank

Main weapon: Flamethrower, tube-mounted coaxially to a standard tank gun

Range: 40 meters (with liquid fuel) and 60-80 meters (with thickened fuel)

Fuel capacity: 290 gallons, located in four carbon dioxide pressurized tanks in the hull (protected by armor)

Total firing time: 2 1/2 minutes

Ignition system: Gasoline, electric

Secondary weapon: 75-millimeter gun (with 40 rounds)

Tertiary weapon: Browning machine guns (.30-caliber) mounted coaxially in the turret and in the bow machine gun port and a Browning M2 antiaircraft machine gun (.50-caliber)

Chassis: M4A1 Sherman tank with track extenders to improve mobility

History:

Developed by the Chemical Warfare Service for the Tenth Army to use in the projected invasion of Japan during World War II, the POA-CWS-H5A (75) was designed for use with the flamethrower or the main gun. Two versions were developed:

* A 75-millimeter gun (with 40 rounds), mounted on an M4A3 tank. Forty-seven vehicles were produced.

* A 105-millimeter howitzer (with 20 rounds), mounted on an M4A3 tank. Twenty-five vehicles were produced.

A total of 72 vehicles were produced in 1945. The vehicles were not used operationally during World War II, but they were used effectively by the U.S. Marine Corps during the Korean War.

This vehicle is on display at the Chemical Corps Museum, Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri.

Name: M67A1 Tank Flamethrower

Type: Main armament flamethrower tank

Main weapon: An M7A1-6, turret-mounted, main armament, mechanized flamethrower (replaced the 90-millimeter main gun)

Range: 180 meters (with thickened fuel)

Fuel capacity: 325 gallons, located in one pressurized tank in the hull (protected by armor)

Total firing time: About 60 seconds

Ignition system: Gasoline, electric

Secondary weapon: 7.62-millimeter, M73 machine gun, mounted coaxially in the turret

Chassis: M48A2 Patton tank

History:

Developed to provide the Army and Marine Corps with a modern armored flamethrower to replace the World War II vintage systems used in Korea, the M67 series was first fielded to the Army and Marine Corps in the mid-1950s. Quickly phased out by the Army, the system was retained by the Marine Corps, modernized, and used in combat during the Vietnam War. The system consisted of an M7A1 fuel and pressure unit, an M6 flamethrower gun, and a control unit. The M7A1 held thickened fuel and pressurized air at 3,000 pounds per square inch. A secondary container held 10 gallons of gasoline to ignite the thickened fuel. A high-tension electrical system provided a spark for ignition.

This vehicle is on display at the Chemical Corps Museum, Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri.
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Title Annotation:flamethrower tank
Author:Walk, Robert
Publication:CML Army Chemical Review
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Jan 1, 2007
Words:422
Previous Article:The U.S. Army Chemical Corps: serving a nation at war, today and tomorrow.
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