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Employment growth in the Kansas City, MO-KS, Metropolitan Statistical Area.

From 1990 to 2007, there was a substantial narrowing of the gap between the higher level of employment on the Missouri side of the Kansas City Metropolitan Statistical Area and the lower level of employment on the Kansas side; leading the shift was robust growth in Johnson County combined with slow growth in Jackson County

The Kansas City, MO-KS, Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) is a bistate area currently consisting of nine counties in Missouri and six counties in Kansas. (1) It is often assumed that Kansas City is in Kansas, yet the central business district of Kansas City is in Missouri and, historically, the Missouri side of the metropolitan area has had a far larger population than the Kansas side of the area. In fact, in 1990 (the year that the data used in this article begin) 61.2 percent of the population of the metropolitan area was on the Missouri side of the State line. By 2007, Kansas had increased its share of the Kansas City area population by 2.6 percentage points and Missouri's share had dropped to 58.6 percent. (2)

While there has been modest growth in the number of residents of the Kansas City area living on the Kansas side, there has been even more growth in the number working on the Kansas side. In fact, substantial employment growth on the Kansas side is closing the gap between the numbers of jobs on the two sides of the State line, with Kansas' share of the MSA's total employment increasing from 38 percent in 1990 to 44 percent in 2007. A single county, Johnson, is responsible for more than 90 percent of the growth in the Kansas portion of the MSA.

This article uses data from the first quarter of each year from 1990 through 2007 to compare shifts in employment and identify the counties and industries that have been instrumental in leading growth in the Kansas portion of the metropolitan area to outpace growth on the Missouri side. All references in this article to the 1990-2007 period refer to data from the first quarter of each each year of the timespan. Monthly employment data from January, February, and March of each year were averaged to create the first-quarter estimates. For the purpose of industry analysis, the Bureau of Labor Statistics aggregates the largest industry sectors defined by the North American Industry Classification System. These aggregated groupings are called "supersectors," and there are 10 of them in private industry: natural resources and mining; construction; manufacturing; trade, transportation, and utilities; information; financial activities; professional and business services; education and health services; leisure and hospitality; and other services. For the purposes of this article, government is treated as an 11th supersector. However, detailed government data are available, categorized as Federal, State, or local with each of these categories divided into the same 10 private industry "supersectors" plus an additional "supersector"--public administration. The employment and wage data examined in this article come from BLS' Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program. (3) This article focuses on "total covered employment," that is, all the employment documented in the QCEW; this includes both private and government employment. In this article, all references to increases or decreases in the number of jobs are references to the net number gained or lost, not to gross job gains or gross job losses.

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The Kansas City, MO-KS, MSA

The Kansas City MSA is centrally located in the Nation. Its geographical location and transportation infrastructure allow it to provide excellent support to the growth of the global market and are instrumental in attracting the mixture of industries that make up the area's economy. According to the Kansas City Area Development Council, the Kansas City area is the second-largest rail center in the country and ranks first in railroad freight volume. (4) Other infrastructure includes three major interstate highways (one of which connects the southern border of the United States to the northern border), a designated Foreign Trade Zone, an international airport, barge lines that operate on the Missouri River, a motor freight hub, and the largest underground storage space in the Nation. (5) Along with its high concentration of jobs in the trade, transportation, and utilities supersector, the Kansas City area also has a higher concentration of jobs than the national average in the information, the financial activities, and the professional and business services supersectors--typical of large metropolitan areas. (6)

Employment in the Kansas City MSA grew at a rate similar to that of U.S. employment from 1990 to 2007. Total covered employment grew 24.8 percent in the United States and 25.6 percent in the Kansas City area, with employment in the metropolitan area rising from 769,480 in the first quarter of 1990 to 966,555 in the first quarter of 2007. In addition, the Kansas City area's private-industry employment growth was on track with the Nation's, experiencing an increase of 26.4 percent compared with the Nation's 25.6 percent.

In the Kansas City MSA 4 of the 10 private-industry supersectors had rates of growth that were higher than the respective averages for the Nation--construction, natural resources and mining, information, and professional and business services. Two additional supersectors, financial activities and leisure and hospitality, grew at rates very similar to the national average. The largest supersector in the MSA--trade, transportation, and utilities--grew at a slower-than-average pace, along with the education and health services and the other services supersectors. Both nationally and locally, only the manufacturing supersector recorded a loss of employment over the 1990-2007 period; however, the Kansas City area lost manufacturing jobs at a slower pace than the Nation did.

Among the largest private-industry supersectors in the MSA are professional and business services, education and health services, leisure and hospitality, and construction. Each of these supersectors added more than 20,000 jobs to the metropolitan area and grew in excess of 40 percent over the 17-year period.

Comparing Missouri and Kansas employment

Although the Kansas City MSA and the United States as a whole had similar rates of employment growth from 1990 to 2007, growth was not evenly distributed between the portion of the metropolitan area in Missouri and the portion in Kansas. In fact, the Kansas portion added over twice as many jobs as the Missouri portion during the period. Total employment on the Kansas side of the State line grew 46.9 percent from the first quarter of 1990 to the first quarter of 2007, compared with a 12.6-percent increase on the Missouri side of the MSA. (See table 1.)

A look at employment shares illustrates the change that occurred from 1990 to 2007. Counties on the Missouri side of the metropolitan area made up 55.6 percent of the metropolitan area's employment in 2007, compared with 62.0 percent in 1990. (See chart 1.)

As metropolitan areas age, growth often moves from the central city to the suburban areas. This was certainly the case in the Kansas City area, with the long-time employment base, Jackson County, Missouri, registering similar levels of employment in both 1990 and 2007, whereas the more suburban Johnson County, Kansas, experienced an explosion of growth. The differing growth patterns in Jackson County, Missouri, and Johnson County, Kansas--the two largest counties in the area--led the shift in employment share between the Missouri and Kansas sides of the metropolitan area.

Jackson County, Missouri, is the largest county in the MSA--its estimated 2007 population is 666,000 (7)--yet in 2007 it barely registered any change from its 1990 level of 301,681 private-industry jobs. The second-largest county in the MSA, Johnson County--with an estimated 2007 population of 524,801--is located on the Kansas side. Johnson County added more than 100,000 jobs to its private-industry payrolls for a total of 279,699 and experienced a growth rate of nearly 69 percent. In spite of the lack of growth in Jackson County, private-industry employment on the Missouri side of the metropolitan area grew over the 17-year period because of a combined increase of more than 43,000 jobs in the smaller counties. In contrast, Johnson County provided the bulk of the growth on the entire Kansas side, as the five remaining Kansas counties in the MSA added a combined total of around 13,000 jobs over the period. Whereas the smaller counties on the Missouri side of the State line were the reason for growth in employment there, the smaller counties on the Kansas side had little impact.

Johnson County's total employment has experienced so much growth that in 2007 it accounted for 32 percent of the employment in the metropolitan area, up from 24 percent of the total in 1990. On the other hand, Jackson County accounted for 38 percent of the MSA total in 2007; in 1990 it accounted for 47 percent of employment in the area. In short, the difference in employment share between these two counties that drive employment in the MSA decreased from 23 percentage points to 6 percentage points over the 1990-2007 period.

Factors that may effect employment growth

Wages. Like employment, the level and distribution of wages in the Kansas City MSA have shifted in favor of the Kansas side. In 1990, wages paid in the Missouri portion accounted for 62 percent of the total wages in the MSA. But by 2007, Missouri's share of total wages in the MSA had decreased to 54 percent. Interestingly, the nominal mean weekly wage ($434) was the same on both sides of the State line in 1990. However, Kansas' nominal mean weekly wage increased more than Missouri's over the 17-year period and was $860 in 2007 compared with Missouri's $817. This divergence in wage change suggests not only that Kansas added more jobs to the MSA than Missouri, but also that it shifted toward higher paying jobs.

The importance of Jackson and Johnson Counties to the MSA is reinforced further by an examination of county wages. (See table 2.) In addition to accounting for the majority of the jobs in the Kansas City area, Jackson and Johnson Counties also account for most of the MSA's wages. Combined, these counties made up 70 percent of employment and accounted for about 75 percent of the wages paid in the MSA in 2007. They are the only counties in the entire MSA that accounted for a higher share of wages than of employment, which clearly indicates that both counties have jobs that are among the higher paying. While the nominal mean weekly wage in Jackson County rose from $449 in 1990 to $873 in 2007, the average wage grew at an even faster pace in Johnson County, increasing from $442 to $910 per week.

Educational attainment. (8) The education level of the population is a factor that drives employment growth, and here a clear difference exists between the two largest counties. Eighty-four percent of the U.S. population age 25 and older has at least a high school degree and 27 percent holds a bachelor's or higher degree. Whereas the average level of educational attainment in Jackson County is similar to the average level of educational attainment in the Nation, the average level in Johnson County is clearly higher than the national average.

In Jackson County, approximately 87 percent of the population is at least a graduate of high school and 26 percent has a bachelor's degree or higher. Much of the urban core of the MSA is located in Jackson County, and as Kansas City's population, jobs, and development continue to decentralize, the region's poor and minority residents remain concentrated in the core. (9) The urban core of Jackson County contains a higher proportion of people with lower levels of education, whereas residents of some of the suburbs are more highly educated. The proportion of the population in Johnson County with a high school education or more is nearly 96 percent. Even more striking is that more than half (51 percent) of the population hold bachelor's or higher degrees. Johnson County has the greatest percentage of college graduates among the seven largest counties in the Kansas City MSA. (10)

A highly educated labor force is attractive to employers. Reverberations from growth associated with an educated labor pool include an increase in high-skill jobs and higher income levels, which typically generate more demand for goods and services among consumers. This higher demand leads to more consumer spending and even more job growth. Thus, greater educational attainment may provide a partial explanation for Johnson County's surge in employment.

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Quality of life. Another likely reason that residents and businesses are drawn to the Kansas side is its reputation as a good place to live. Money magazine annually ranks the top 100 places to live, and two cities in the Kansas portion of the MSA made the 2006 list. Both are located in Johnson County and ranked in the top 15--with Overland Park placing 6th and Olathe 13th. The only city on the Missouri side to make the top 100, Lee's Summit (located in Jackson County), ranked 44th. (11)

The MSA's two major employment bases

Jackson County, Missouri. Jackson County is the second-largest county by population in the State of Missouri and is the location of Kansas City's central business district and much of the MSA's urban core. (12) From 1990 to 2007, the population of Jackson County grew a modest 5.3 percent according to the U.S. Census Bureau, lagging well behind the national growth rate of 21.3 percent. Although Jackson County has historically been the largest county in the MSA and still has the highest employment level in the Kansas City area (364,529 total, with 301,695 in private industry), it contributed little to the growth of the area over the 17-year period. Four private-industry supersectors and the government sector registered employment growth of more than 5 percent, with growth in only two of these exceeding 20 percent. Nationally, nine private-industry supersectors and the government grew more than 5 percent, with all but four of these growing more than 20 percent. In all supersectors, Jackson County's employment growth was weaker than the employment growth of the Nation as a whole.

Johnson County, Kansas. Johnson County has the largest population of any county in the State of Kansas. During the period from 1990 to 2007, the population of Johnson County grew by 48.2 percent, more than double the national rate, and accounted for 92 percent of total population growth on the Kansas side of the MSA. Johnson County ranks second to Jackson County in total employment in the MSA, with total employment of 309,321 and private-industry employment of 279,699, but has added the larger number of jobs in private industry (114,031) and accounted for 90 percent of total private-industry employment growth on the Kansas side of the metropolitan area. The rate of private-industry employment growth in Johnson County, 68.8 percent from the first quarter of 1990 to the first quarter of 2007, far outpaced the national growth rate of 25.6 percent. All but one of Johnson County's private-industry supersectors and the government sector had rates of increase above 20 percent during the 17-year timeframe used for this article, with four growing in excess of 100 percent. All of the supersectors and the government sector grew faster in the county than they did in the Nation as a whole; employment in six private-industry supersectors and in government grew more than twice as fast as in the United States as a whole.

Comparison. A comparison of employment growth among industry supersectors over the 17-year period in Jackson and Johnson Counties shows Johnson County dominating in all but one supersector. (See table 3.) In five private-industry supersectors--construction, financial activities, professional and business services, education and health services, and leisure and hospitality--and in government, both Jackson County and Johnson County experienced job growth. However, except for in construction, where job gains were actually higher in Jackson than Johnson, the number of jobs added by each supersector in Johnson was more than twice as many as were added by each corresponding supersector in Jackson. And in every supersector in which employment in Jackson County declined over the period--natural resources and mining; manufacturing; trade, transportation, and utilities; information; and other services--Johnson County added jobs.

Employment in Jackson and Johnson Counties

Total employment. Johnson County, Kansas, consistently recorded stronger employment growth than Jackson County, Missouri, from 1990 to 2007. A look at more recent data shows that beginning in 2001 Jackson County recorded four consecutive over-the-year job losses, but turned around and gained jobs in 2005, 2006, and 2007. (See chart 2.) However, while Jackson County added a total of 6,122 jobs in 2005 and 2006, an increase of 1.7 percent, Johnson County added even more jobs, increasing employment by 11,126, or 3.9 percent. From the first quarter of 2006 to the first quarter of 2007, Johnson County employment growth (11,894) was more than seven times that of Jackson County (1,669). A comparison of job growth among private-industry supersectors and government identifies the supersectors that had the largest impact on the overall difference in growth between the counties over the 17-year period. (See table 4.)

Trade, transportation, and utilities. The Kansas City MSA added 16,656 jobs in the trade, transportation, and utilities supersector from 1990 to 2007. This supersector--the largest one in both Jackson and Johnson Counties--presents a prime example of the shift in employment that has occurred over the past several years. Trade, transportation, and utilities grew 32 percent in Johnson County, adding the third-largest number of jobs (15,924) to payrolls in the county from the first quarter of 1990 to the first quarter of 2007. Meanwhile, Jackson County lost 7,918 jobs (11 percent) in this supersector.

From 1990 through 2000, Johnson County's growth in trade, transportation, and utilities was strong and nearly 19,500 jobs were added. During the same period, Jackson County recorded a total loss of around 3,500 jobs in the same supersector. Since then, the counties have performed similarly, both registering lower job totals in 2007 than in 2000 but showing either growth or little movement in the most recent 3 years. Thus, although Jackson County had over 20,000 more jobs in this sector than did Johnson County in 1990, Johnson County had over 1,000 more jobs in the sector than Jackson County in 2007.

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Within this supersector, retail trade employment in Jackson County lost out as employment in the suburban counties was expanding with the addition of new shopping areas and strip malls. Wholesale trade and utilities also recorded employment losses in the county while employment in transportation and warehousing was nearly stagnant. Johnson County was at the other end of the spectrum, with employment gains registered in wholesale trade, retail trade, and transportation and warehousing over the 17-year period.

Professional and business services. The Kansas City MSA added 59,943 jobs in the professional and business services supersector from 1990 to 2007. This supersector--the second largest in private industry in both Jackson and Johnson Counties--provided the largest number of new jobs in each of the MSA's largest two counties, but still reflects a divergence in growth. Professional and business services in Jackson County grew 30 percent, contributing 12,033 new jobs to the MSA, while Johnson County added 34,170 jobs in this supersector--an expansion of 133 percent.

In 1990, Jackson County had substantially more jobs in professional and business services than did Johnson County. However, the number of jobs in this supersector added in Johnson County from 1990 to 2007 was nearly three times the number added in Jackson County. Beginning in 2001, Johnson and Jackson Counties both experienced 3 years of job losses in this supersector, with Johnson County's 3-year loss totaling 5,816 jobs and Jackson County's totaling 9,697. In the 4 years since these counties began to again add employment in this supersector, Johnson added a total of 14,215 jobs while Jackson gained 4,590. As a result, Johnson County had over 8,000 more jobs in professional and business services than did Jackson County by the first quarter of 2007.

While most of the industry groups within this supersector added jobs in both counties, the number of new jobs was in most cases larger in Johnson County. A single industry group--employment services--added close to 10,000 jobs in Johnson County, but added a much lesser 1,153 jobs in Jackson County. The fast rate of employment growth in Johnson County in professional and business services, a supersector with a higher concentration of employment in the the Kansas City area than in the Nation as a whole, makes the supersector of increasing importance to Johnson County.

Information. The Kansas City MSA added 7,170 jobs in the information supersector over the 17-year period. This industry provides yet another example of differences in employment changes between the two counties. While information employment fell 24 percent in Jackson County, a loss of 5,356 jobs, it surged 128 percent in Johnson County with the addition of 12,496 jobs. Further exemplifying the differences in growth between these counties, among all private-industry supersectors the industry group with the largest loss of jobs (a decrease of 5,244 jobs) in Jackson County was the same as the industry group that posted the largest gain (11,328) of any industry group in Johnson County: wired telecommunications carriers. During the 1990-2007 period, a major telecommunications employer consolidated its multiple locations throughout the MSA into one major location in Johnson County, partially explaining the gain in information jobs in this county and the loss in Jackson County.

Interestingly, again among all industry groups within all supersectors, the industry group in which Jackson County outperformed Johnson County by the greatest number of jobs also was in the information supersector--data processing and related services. More than 2,500 more jobs in this industry group were added in Jackson County than in Johnson County over the period.

Recent data show that, following 5 consecutive years of job loss in Johnson County, employment in the information supersector rebounded and grew by more than 3,000 jobs from the first quarter of 2006 to the first quarter of 2007. Although the overall number of jobs in information is much smaller than in many other supersectors, information is frequently mentioned in regard to the economy of the Kansas City area because of the area's high concentration of jobs in this industry. The importance of the information sector to Johnson County has grown tremendously over the 17-year period, with the sector's concentration of employment in the county rising from almost twice the national average in 1990 to nearly triple the national average in 2007. By comparison, Jackson County experienced its seventh straight over-the-year job loss from the first quarter of 2006 to the first quarter of 2007. Despite the loss of jobs, the county also continued to have a substantially higher-than-average concentration of information-sector employment--about twice the national average in 2007.

Education and health services. The Kansas City MSA added 36,244 jobs from 1990 to 2007 in the education and health services supersector. Growth was seen in both counties, but at drastically different rates. In Johnson County, the education and health services supersector added 19,412 jobs, an increase of 140 percent over the 17-year period. Jackson County employment in this supersector increased about 10 percent, adding 4,081 jobs--less than one-fourth of the number added in Johnson. During the 17-year period, Johnson County recorded no over-the-year job losses in this supersector; since 2001, the county has added more than 1,000 jobs in five of the seven years. Jackson County gained more than 1,000 jobs during only one year since 2001, and in one year (2004) lost in excess of 1,500 jobs. However, in 2007 Jackson County still had a higher employment level in education and health services, with 44,334 jobs compared with Johnson County's 33,284.

While both educational services and health care and social assistance contributed to Jackson County's increase in employment within this supersector, employment growth in health care and social assistance accounted for nearly all of the expansion in Johnson County. Among the industry groups that experienced the largest differences in growth between the counties were medical and diagnostic laboratories, physician's offices, and nursing care facilities, each adding well over 1,000 jobs to Johnson County's economy. Though growth in education and health services played a major role in job creation in Johnson County, in 2007 this supersector still had a below-average concentration of workers in the county as compared with the Nation as a whole, suggesting room for the supersector to grow in Johnson County simply to support the county economy.

Manufacturing. From 1990 to 2007, the Kansas City MSA lost 12,037 jobs in the manufacturing supersector--the only supersector in which jobs were lost over the period. While employment in Johnson County increased 8 percent, an addition of 1,496 jobs, Jackson County recorded a 32-percent decrease in employment (a loss of 12,720 jobs). Jackson County's job losses were widespread, with the industry group of other fabricated metal product manufacturing shedding 3,651 jobs, the most of any industry group within manufacturing. The county lost jobs every year from 1998 to 2007 with the exception of 2006 when the level of employment remained nearly unchanged. Conversely, Johnson County gained jobs in four of the five most recent years of the 17-year period and in 2007 was one of three counties in the MSA to show an increase of more than 100 jobs in manufacturing employment.

Financial activities. The Kansas City MSA added 12,693 jobs in the financial activities supersector from 1990 to 2007. Whereas employment in the financial activities supersector increased only slightly over the 17-year timespan in Jackson County, it grew 60 percent in Johnson County and created 10,794 jobs. Within the supersector, the largest discrepancy in growth was seen in depository credit intermediation, which added 2,782 jobs in Johnson County but lost an even greater number in Jackson County. Insurance agencies, brokerages, and related businesses also experienced very different levels of growth in the two counties, with Johnson County adding more than 3,000 jobs and Jackson County adding around 1,000.

During the 1990s both counties shared in the growth of this supersector, with each county taking top honors in about half of the years. However, the degree of growth varied, and in total Johnson County added about twice the number of jobs as Jackson from 1990 to 2000. The last year that growth in Jackson fared better than growth in Johnson was 2000, and more recently the shift in growth has been even more pronounced, with Johnson County adding more than 3,500 jobs between 2004 and 2007 while Jackson County's employment remained nearly unchanged. As of 2007, both counties continue to have a much higher-than-average concentration of jobs in financial activities.

Leisure and hospitality. The Kansas City MSA added 27,194 jobs in the leisure and hospitality supersector from 1990 to 2007, an increase of 42.6 percent. Each of the two largest counties contributed to the supersector's increase in employment over the 17-year period, with the addition of 3,718 jobs in Jackson and 11,138 in Johnson. The growth in both counties was primarily driven by the same industry group--full-service restaurants. This group added 7,295 jobs to payrolls in Johnson County and 4,233 in Jackson County. The rate of employment growth in full-service restaurants was 161 percent in Johnson and 52 percent in Jackson. Interestingly, employment growth in limited-service eating places was similar in the two counties, adding a little over 1,000 jobs to payrolls in each county. The amusement, gambling, and recreation industry subsector also was an area of strong growth for both counties, with the number of jobs in Johnson County increasing by 1,650 (106 percent) and in Jackson County rising by 966 (74 percent).

Johnson County added about three times the number of jobs in the leisure and hospitality supersector as Jackson County over the 17-year period, and much of Johnson County's growth occurred in 2000 and earlier. After 2000, the over-the-year increase in employment in this supersector in the county surpassed 500 jobs only twice. Growth in Jackson County has been equally dim since 2000, with no over-the-year increases in jobs exceeding 500 until 2007. In that year, Jackson County's addition of 930 jobs--an influx possibly related to the revitalization of the downtown area--was the largest either county had seen since 2000.

Government. The Kansas City MSA added 25,075 jobs in government from the first quarter of 1990 to the first quarter of 2007. Government payrolls increased in both counties over the period, with Johnson County (11,267) adding more than twice as many jobs as Jackson (4,647). The difference in growth is of particular interest considering the importance of government to Jackson County. Government accounts for 17 percent of the county's employment, second only to trade, transportation, and utilities. Comparatively, government ranks as the fourth-largest supersector in Johnson County and accounts for 10 percent of employment.

The largest government sector in both counties, local government (which includes public school systems), added 7,139 jobs in Jackson County, an increase of 23 percent. This sector's 82-percent growth in Johnson County--an increase of 11,634 jobs--strongly outpaced its growth in Jackson. Population growth and, more specifically, growth in the number of school-aged children, contributed to these changes in employment. While the number of children aged 5 to 17 grew 43 percent in Johnson County from 1990 to 2006, it increased only 7 percent in Jackson County. (13) Employment in elementary and secondary schools grew 73 percent in Johnson County from the first quarter of 1990 to the first quarter of 2007 and accounted for more than 6,000 of the new jobs in local government. Jackson County added 2,798 jobs, commensurate with its smaller gain in school-aged children, and registered a job growth rate of 19 percent in elementary and secondary schools.

Employment in State government in Jackson County was up 24 percent, or 1,466 jobs, for the 17-year period. Conversely, State government in Johnson County lost 190 employees, a decrease of 20 percent. The number of jobs in Federal Government declined in both counties, with Jackson County shedding 3,958 jobs, a reduction of 19 percent, and Johnson County down 6 percent, or 177 jobs, from its 1990 level.

Other services. The Kansas City MSA added 3,772 jobs in the "other services" supersector from the first quarter of 1990 to the first quarter of 2007 to reach a level of 26,704 jobs. Employment in other services, the second-smallest supersector in the MSA, edged down in Jackson County over the period but grew by 2,620 in Johnson County, with about half of the growth occurring in personal care services--an industry group that recorded a small loss in Jackson County. Johnson County's highest levels of growth in the supersector occurred during the 1990s, and the county experienced job losses from 2004 to 2006. Both counties' employment levels were lower in 2007 than in the first quarter of 2004, but by less than 150 jobs.

Natural resources and mining. During the 17-year period, the Kansas City MSA added 372 jobs in the natural resources and mining supersector--the smallest supersector in the area. Even with its small number of jobs, the industry presents another example of the differing growth patterns in the two largest counties in the MSA. The number of jobs in natural resources and mining fell by 39 percent to a total of 216 jobs in Jackson County. Conversely, it grew 108 percent to a level of 451 jobs in Johnson County.

Construction. The Kansas City MSA added 21,835 jobs in the construction supersector from 1990 to 2007. Among all of the supersectors, only in construction did the two largest counties contribute similar numbers of new jobs to the MSA. Construction's potential to indicate future growth makes it all the more critical to this analysis. Construction employment in Johnson County increased 71 percent over the 17-year period, an addition of 5,747 jobs. Surprisingly, the only county in the MSA to add more construction jobs over the period was Jackson County--a county that recorded little overall job growth. Construction exhibited the fastest rate of job growth of any supersector in Jackson County, increasing 46 percent with the addition of 6,005 jobs over the 17-year span. In both counties, the industry group of building equipment contractors grew by more jobs than other industry groups in the construction supersector. Contributing the most to the differing levels of growth by number of jobs was nonresidential building construction, which added more than 1,300 jobs in Jackson County but fewer than 500 in Johnson County.

Job growth in construction slowed after 2000. In its largest over-the-year movement since then, Jackson County gained 2,076 construction jobs in 2006--possibly an early benefit of a concentrated effort to rejuvenate the central business district--but lost 846 in 2007 as revitalization projects wound down. From 2001 to 2007, Johnson County's employment in construction did not change from year to year by more than 700 jobs except for a loss of 1,255 jobs in 2002.

Summary of the supersectors' employment. Of the private-industry supersectors and the government, six supersectors experienced growth in employment from 1990 to 2007 in Jackson County while five recorded losses of employment. Employment advances in professional and business services, construction, government, education and health services, leisure and hospitality, and financial activities were almost wiped out by declines in manufacturing; trade, transportation and utilities; information; other services; and natural resources and mining. In stark contrast, every private-industry supersector and the government in Johnson County added jobs. Eight of the 10 private-industry supersectors grew more than 50 percent over the period; four grew more than 100 percent. Government employment also grew more than 50 percent. In all but two of the supersectors, Johnson County contributed more new jobs than any other county in the entire metropolitan area.

In 1990, the majority of employment in all supersectors was in Jackson County. In fact, Jackson County had no less than 46 percent more jobs in every supersector than any other county in the MSA. Over the 17-year period, employment in Johnson County grew to the extent that employment in the largest two supersectors--trade, transportation, and utilities, and professional and business services--and in the information and the natural resources and mining supersectors was higher in 2007 in Johnson County, Kansas, than in Jackson County, Missouri.

Other counties in the Kansas City MSA

Although Jackson and Johnson Counties make up the majority of the workforce in the Kansas City area--no other county makes up more than 10 percent of the total employment of the MSA--several other counties experienced strong rates of growth from 1990 to 2007. If Johnson and Jackson Counties continue to perform as they did during this period, the performance of several of the smaller counties in the MSA may be key in determining whether the Missouri portion of the MSA can continue to maintain a larger share of total employment.

Three additional counties in the MSA have employment levels of more than 35,000--Clay County and Platte County in Missouri and Wyandotte County in Kansas. In addition to being among the larger of the "other counties," both of the Missouri counties experienced large employment gains over the period and became centers of growth that helped support the Missouri portion of the area when Jackson County did not.

Clay County, Missouri. Clay County is the second-largest county on the Missouri side of the Kansas City MSA. It had a population of 211,525 in 2007 and is one of the fastest growing counties in the area. From 1990 to 2007 its population grew 38 percent. Total employment also is on the rise in the county, standing at 88,812 in 2007, an increase of 25,685, or 41 percent, over its 1990 level. Clay County's jobs account for 9 percent of the MSA's total employment and 17 percent of total employment on the Missouri side of the State line.

Five private-industry supersectors in Clay County added more than 1,000 jobs over the period. The government and two private-industry supersectors--professional and business services, and leisure and hospitality--added more than 5,000 jobs and grew in employment by more than 75 percent. Employment in professional and business services grew by 6,029, an increase of 121 percent and a figure equal to nearly one-quarter of the new jobs in Clay County. Government employment, which made up 16 percent of the county's total employment in 2007, increased by 6,025 jobs (77 percent) and accounted for about another one-quarter of the new jobs in the county. Nearly all of the increase in government employment can be attributed to education and health services, which includes jobs in public school systems. Leisure and hospitality added 5,442 jobs for an increase of 91 percent from the first quarter of 1990 to the first quarter of 2007.

Platte County, Missouri. Platte County, Missouri, ranks fourth in population among the Missouri counties in the Kansas City MSA, yet it ranks third in total private employment among the counties on the Missouri side. In 2007, Platte County's population grew to 84,881, up 46.7 percent from its 1990 level, outpacing the Nation and all but one (Cass County) of the Missouri counties that make up the MSA. Total employment expanded by 14,180 jobs, an increase of 59 percent, over the 17-year span. All 10 private-industry supersectors and the government added jobs over the period.

Two of the supersectors that drove growth in Clay County--professional and business services, and leisure and hospitality--also led the expansion in the adjoining county of Platte. Professional and business services added 3,930 jobs over the 17-year period, an increase of 122 percent. Employment in leisure and hospitality grew by 3,365 jobs, an increase of 125 percent. Two additional supersectors added more than 1,000 jobs and grew in excess of 50 percent: manufacturing employment increased by 1,633 jobs (119 percent) and employment in education and health services rose by 1,110 jobs (82 percent). Government employment growth also was strong, increasing by 1,303 (54 percent).

Wyandotte County, Kansas. The second-largest county on the Kansas side of the MSA and home to the city of Kansas City, Kansas, Wyandotte County made up 8 percent of total employment in the Kansas City MSA and accounted for 19 percent of the employment located on the Kansas side of the MSA in 2007. From 1990 to 2007, Wyandotte County was the only county in the Kansas City MSA to lose population, and the county contributed only slightly to employment growth on the Kansas side.

As of the first quarter of 2007, two supersectors recorded at least 1,000 more jobs than in 1990--education and health services, and leisure and hospitality. Education and health services added 5,153 jobs and accounted for the majority of private-sector employment growth in Wyandotte County over the 17-year period; virtually all of the new jobs were in health care and social assistance (4,642), whose employment increased by 77 percent. Leisure and hospitality employment expanded by 1,516 jobs from the first quarter of 1990 to the first quarter of 2007. New jobs in accommodation and food services led the way in this supersector. Contributing to growth in accommodation and food services was the opening of Wyandotte County's Kansas Speedway in 2001. The Speedway hosts NASCAR and other racing events and has attracted hotels, restaurants, and other retail establishments to the area.

The largest supersector in Wyandotte County, trade transportation and utilities, did not record a higher level of employment in 2007 than in 1990. Government (with the second-largest employment level in the county) also decreased in size, as measured by employment. Trade, transportation, and utilities had little change in its employment level over the period, while government decreased its size by nearly 10 percent with a loss of 1,659 jobs.

Remaining Missouri counties. The remaining six counties that make up the rest of the Missouri portion of the Kansas City MSA--Cass, Lafayette, Ray, Clinton, Bates, and Caldwell--accounted for 4.7 percent of total employment in the Kansas City MSA in 2007. Cass County experienced a boom in population and job growth over the 1990-2007 period. Total employment in the county more than doubled, with 11,202 new jobs resulting in 102-percent employment growth and no supersector experiencing a decline. Trade, transportation, and utilities led the way with 3,534 new jobs created, followed by government, up 2,235 jobs, education and health services, up 1,445, and construction, up 1,308. Clinton County added 1,877 jobs over the period and Lafayette contributed 1,177. Ray and Bates Counties each added fewer than 1,000 jobs and Caldwell County was nearly unchanged.

Remaining Kansas counties. The remaining four counties that compose the rest of the Kansas portion of the Kansas City MSA--Franklin, Leavenworth, Miami, and Linn--accounted for 4.1 percent of total employment in the MSA in 2007. Franklin County exhibited the strongest growth among these counties, adding 3,119 jobs with close to two-thirds of the growth coming from trade, transportation, and utilities. Leavenworth and Miami Counties added 2,728 jobs and 2,336 jobs, respectively. Employment in Linn County was essentially unchanged from its 1990 level.

FROM 1990 TO 2007, KANSAS' SHARE of the Kansas City MSA's total employment increased from 38 percent to 44 percent, and employment on the Kansas side of the metropolitan area grew nearly four times faster than in the Missouri portion. Perhaps the most striking comparison is that the Missouri portion of the MSA had 63 percent more jobs than did the Kansas portion in 1990, but in 2007 Missouri's counties had only 25 percent more jobs than the counties on the Kansas side.

By a wide margin, the two largest counties in the area are Jackson County, Missouri, and Johnson County, Kansas. In 1990, Jackson County contributed substantially more jobs to the area than did Johnson County; by 2007, the gap was closing. The difference between the two counties' shares of the MSA's employment was 23 percentage points in 1990, but only 6 percentage points by 2007.

Johnson County, Kansas, still ranks second to Jackson County, Missouri, in total employment in the MSA, but it added the largest number of jobs in the metropolitan area (125,297) over the 17-year period. Its surge in growth was spearheaded by the same industries that accounted for gains in employment in the MSA overall, and, from the first quarter of 1990 to the first quarter of 2007, every industry supersector grew at a faster pace than the national average. Employment in eight private-industry supersectors and the government in Johnson County grew more than 50 percent over the period; employment in four of the supersectors grew more than 100 percent. Johnson County's employment advances in the two largest supersectors in the MSA--trade, transportation, and utilities, and professional and business services--led to 2007 employment levels that exceeded those of Jackson County. In 8 of the 10 private-industry supersectors, by number of jobs Johnson County contributed more net job growth than any other county in the MSA--further evidence that it was the growth of employment in Johnson County more than in any other county that supported the metropolitan area and also that Johnson County's employment growth was the reason that the Kansas side of the metropolitan area gained on the Missouri side.

With the most highly educated labor pool in the area and cities ranked among the most desirable in the country to live, Johnson County continues to have the potential for a high rate of employment growth. However, even if Johnson County continues to outpace Jackson County, it is still possible that the Missouri side as a whole can maintain its larger share of the MSA's employment. The ability to do this may depend on the Missouri side's second- and third-largest counties--Clay and Platte. These two counties each had over 35,000 jobs in 2007, while the Kansas side had only one county besides Johnson with employment above that level. This Kansas County, Wyandotte, showed lackluster growth in total employment over the 1990-2007 period. In contrast, employment increased by 41 percent in Clay county and by 59 percent in Platte County. Clay and Platte together added nearly 40,000 jobs over the period, helping to pick up the slack for Jackson County's lack of growth. Cass is another Missouri county that is worthy of mention. Although it had only around 22,000 total jobs in 2007, that is more than double the level of employment in 1990. If employment in Jackson County, Missouri, continues to perform as it has during the 1990-2007 timespan, it may be the employment growth in the smaller counties that allows Missouri to maintain its status as the primary State in the MSA.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT: The authors thank Stan Suchman and Cheryl Abbot for their assistance in the preparation of this article.

Notes

(1) The Office of Management and Budget definition of the Kansas City Metropolitan Statistical Area changed during the reference period for this study. In 1990, a total of 10 counties were included in the MSA. One county (Clinton County, Missouri) was added in 1993 and four more (Linn County, Kansas; Bates County, Missouri; Caldwell County, Missouri; and Cass County, Missouri) were added in 2003. For purposes of this study, data for all 15 counties were compiled to create statistics that are comparable from one period to another.

(2) Shares were calculated by summing county population data for each state and dividing by the population of the total metropolitan area. Calculations were made using 1990 and 2007 data located on a page of the U.S. Census Bureau Web site: http://factfinder.census.gov (visited Sept. 18, 2009). For 1990 data, see http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/ QTTable?_bm=y&-state=qt&-context=qt&-qr_name=DEC_1990_STF1_DP1&-ds_name=DEC_ 1990_STF1_&-tree_id=100&-all_geo_types=N&-_caller=geoselect&-geo_ id=05000US20059&-geo_id=05000US20091&-geo_ id=05000US20103&-geo_id=05000US20107&-geo_ id=05000US20121&-geo_id=05000US20209&-geo_id=05000US29013&-geo_ id=05000US29025&-geo_id=05000US29037&-geo_ id=05000US29047&-geo_id=05000US29049&-geo_id=05000US29095&-geo_ id=05000US29107&-geo_id=05000US29165&-geo_ id=05000US29177&-search_results=05000US20209&-format=&-_lang=en (visited Sept. 18, 2009). For 2007 data, see http://factfinder.census.gov/home/ en/official_estimates_2007.html (visited Sept. 18, 2009). Under "Popular Tables", click on "Counties within a State", and choose a State from the dropdown box.

(3) The QCEW is a cooperative program involving BLS and the various State Workforce Agencies (SWAs). The program provides employment and wage data for workers covered by State unemployment insurance laws. The data are compiled from quarterly contribution reports submitted to the SWAs by employers. Employment and wage data on Federal civilian workers covered by the Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees program are compiled from quarterly reports that are sent to the appropriate SWA by the Federal agency in question. The employment and wage data used in this article were derived from microdata summaries of more than 9.1 million employer reports of employment and wages submitted by States to BLS. These reports are based on workers' place of employment rather than their place of residence. QCEW data are available at www.bls.gov/cew (visited Sept. 1, 2009).

(4) See http://thinkkc.com/SiteLocation/GreaterKCProfile/Transportation. php (visited Sept. 1, 2009).

(5) See www.thinkkc.com/SiteLocation/Industries/Distribution/Dist_Advantages. php (visited Sept. 1, 2009). Most of the underground storage space is in caves.

(6) Concentrations of employment are determined through an analysis of local and national QCEW data.

(7) See http://factfinder.census.gov/, click on "Population Finder," search for population by county and State, and click on "alphabetic" under "View more results." Other population figures in this article also come from the same Web site.

(8) See http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/STTable?_bm=y&-qr_ name=ACS_2006_EST_G00_S1501&-ds_name=ACS_2006_EST_G00_&-state=st&-_ lang=en (visited Sept. 18, 2009) for educational attainment data for the United States. Click on "Change geography" in the left-hand navigational column to search for data by county or State.

(9) Jennifer S. Vey, Organizing for Success: A Call to Action for the Kansas City Region (Washington, DC, The Brookings Institution, August 2006).

(10) Estimates of educational attainment for the smaller counties in the MSA were not available from the Census Bureau.

(11) Money magazine, "Best Places to Live, 2006," on the Internet at http:// money.cnn.com/magazines/moneymag/bplive/2006/top100/index.html (visited Sept. 18, 2009).

(12) Portions of Wyandotte County, Kansas, are also considered a part of the Kansas City, MO-KS, urban core.

(13) Growth rates were calculated by comparing 1990 and 2006 data located at http://factfinder.census.gov. See table P011 for 1990 data and table S0101 for 2006 data. Table P011, which has 1990 data on Johnson County and Jackson County, is located at http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/DT-Table?_bm =y&-state=dt&-context=dt&-ds_name=DEC_1990_STF1_&- mt_name=DEC_1990_STF1_P011&-tree_id=100&-redoLog=true&-all_ geo_types=N&-_caller=geoselect&-geo_id=05000US20091&-geo_id= 05000US29095&-search_results=05000US20091&-format=&- _lang=en (visited Sept. 18, 2009). For 2006 data on Johnson County, see Table S0101 at http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/STTable?_bm=y&-state=st &-context=st&-qr_name=ACS_2006_EST_G00_S0101&-ds_name=ACS_ 2006_EST_G00_&-tree_id=306&-redoLog=true&-_caller=geoselect&-geo_ id=05000US20091&-format=&-_lang=en. For 2006 data on Jackson County, see Table S0101 at http://factfinder.census.gov/ servlet/STTable?_bm=y&-state=st&-context=st&-qr_name=ACS_2006_ EST_G00_S0101&-ds_name=ACS_2006_EST_G00_&-tree_id=306&-redoLog=true&-_ caller=geoselect&-geo_id=05000US29095&-format=&-_lang=en (visited Sept. 18, 2009).

Jacqueline Michael-Midkiff is a regional economist, and Linda Nickisch and Cassandra Yocum are economists, all in the Kansas City economic analysis and information office of the Bureau of Labor Statistics. E-mail: Midkiff.Jacqueline@bls.gov, Nickisch.Linda@bls.gov, and Yocum.Cassandra@bls.gov
Table 1. Employment growth in the United States; the Kansas City,
MO-KS, MSA; and counties within the MSA; first quarter 1990 to
first quarter 2007

                                            Total covered employment
Area
                                                1990              2007

United States                            106,906,249       133,366,015
  Kansas City, MO-KS, MSA (1)                769,480           966,555
    Kansas counties (2)                      292,048           428,954
      Franklin County, Kansas                  6,367             9,486
      Johnson County, Kansas                 184,024           309,321
      Leavenworth County, Kansas              17,347            20,075
      Linn County, Kansas                      1,986             2,027
      Miami County, Kansas                     5,934             8,270
      Wyandotte County, Kansas                76,390            79,775

    Missouri counties (3)                    477,431           537,599
      Bates County, Missouri                   3,146             3,753
      Caldwell County, Missouri                1,594             1,613
      Cass County, Missouri                   11,025            22,227
      Clay County, Missouri                   63,127            88,812
      Clinton County, Missouri                 3,125             5,002
      Jackson County, Missouri               359,866           364,529
      Lafayette County, Missouri               7,881             9,058
      Platte County, Missouri                 24,232            38,412
      Ray County, Missouri                     3,435             4,193

                                           Total covered employment
Area
                                                               Percent
                                          Net change            change

United States                             26,459,766              24.8
  Kansas City, MO-KS, MSA (1)                197,075              25.6
    Kansas counties (2)                      136,906              46.9
      Franklin County, Kansas                  3,119              49.0
      Johnson County, Kansas                 125,297              68.1
      Leavenworth County, Kansas               2,728              15.7
      Linn County, Kansas                         41               2.1
      Miami County, Kansas                     2,336              39.4
      Wyandotte County, Kansas                 3,385               4.4

    Missouri counties (3)                     60,168              12.6
      Bates County, Missouri                     607              19.3
      Caldwell County, Missouri                   19               1.2
      Cass County, Missouri                   11,202             101.6
      Clay County, Missouri                   25,685              40.7
      Clinton County, Missouri                 1,877              60.1
      Jackson County, Missouri                 4,663               1.3
      Lafayette County, Missouri               1,177              14.9
      Platte County, Missouri                 14,180              58.5
      Ray County, Missouri                       758              22.1

                                          Private-industry employment
Area
                                                1990              2007

United States                             88,984,929       111,789,312
  Kansas City, MO-KS, MSA (1)                646,004           816,458
    Kansas counties (2)                      244,762           371,817
      Franklin County, Kansas                  4,966             7,601
      Johnson County, Kansas                 165,668           279,699
      Leavenworth County, Kansas               9,330            12,595
      Linn County, Kansas                      1,403             1,248
      Miami County, Kansas                     3,888             6,123
      Wyandotte County, Kansas                59,507            64,551

    Missouri counties (3)                    401,242           444,640
      Bates County, Missouri                   2,203             2,510
      Caldwell County, Missouri                1,011               923
      Cass County, Missouri                    8,526            17,492
      Clay County, Missouri                   55,279            74,940
      Clinton County, Missouri                 2,446             2,939
      Jackson County, Missouri               301,681           301,695
      Lafayette County, Missouri               5,955             6,692
      Platte County, Missouri                 21,821            34,699
      Ray County, Missouri                     2,320             2,750

                                          Private-industry employment
Area
                                                               Percent
                                          Net change            change

United States                             22,804,383              25.6
  Kansas City, MO-KS, MSA (1)                170,454              26.4
    Kansas counties (2)                      127,055              51.9
      Franklin County, Kansas                  2,635              53.1
      Johnson County, Kansas                 114,031              68.8
      Leavenworth County, Kansas               3,265              35.0
      Linn County, Kansas                       -155             -11.0
      Miami County, Kansas                     2,235              57.5
      Wyandotte County, Kansas                 5,044               8.5

    Missouri counties (3)                     43,398              10.8
      Bates County, Missouri                     307              13.9
      Caldwell County, Missouri                  -88              -8.7
      Cass County, Missouri                    8,966             105.2
      Clay County, Missouri                   19,661              35.6
      Clinton County, Missouri                   493              20.2
      Jackson County, Missouri                    14               0.0
      Lafayette County, Missouri                 737              12.4
      Platte County, Missouri                 12,878              59.0
      Ray County, Missouri                       430              18.5

(1) Totals for MSA may not equal sums of counties' data because
of rounding.

(2) Data are a summation of figures from the individual counties
of Franklin, Johnson, Leavenworth, Linn, Miami, and Wyandottein
Kansas.

(3) Data are a summation of figures from the individual counties
of Bates, Caldwell, Cass, Clay, Clinton, Jackson, Lafayette,
Platte, and Ray in Missouri.

SOURCE: Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Table 2. The percent of total covered employment and percent of
wages in the Kansas City, MO-KS, MSA that were held by individual
counties within the MSA, first quarter 1990 and first quarter 2007

                                    Percent of MSA employment
County
                                        1990         2007

Franklin County, Kansas                  0.8          1.0
Johnson County, Kansas                  23.9         32.0
Leavenworth County, Kansas               2.3          2.1
Linn County, Kansas                       .3           .2
Miami County, Kansas                      .8           .9
Wyandotte County, Kansas                 9.9          8.3

Bates County, Missouri                    .4           .4
Caldwell County, Missouri                 .2           .2
Cass County, Missouri                    1.4          2.3
Clay County, Missouri                    8.2          9.2
Clinton County, Missouri                  .4           .5
Jackson County, Missouri                46.8         37.7
Lafayette County, Missouri               1.0           .9
Platte County, Missouri                  3.1          4.0
Ray County, Missouri                      .4           .4

                                        Percent of MSA wages
County
                                        1990            2007

Franklin County, Kansas                  0.6             0.6
Johnson County, Kansas                  24.3            34.8
Leavenworth County, Kansas               1.9             1.7
Linn County, Kansas                       .2              .2
Miami County, Kansas                      .5              .5
Wyandotte County, Kansas                10.4             7.7

Bates County, Missouri                    .2              .2
Caldwell County, Missouri                 .1              .1
Cass County, Missouri                    1.0             1.5
Clay County, Missouri                    7.6             8.8
Clinton County, Missouri                  .2              .3
Jackson County, Missouri                48.4            39.4
Lafayette County, Missouri                .6              .5
Platte County, Missouri                  3.5             3.3
Ray County, Missouri                      .3              .2

SOURCE: Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages.

Table 3. Employment and employment change, by industry supersector
and government, in the United States; in the Kansas City, MO-KS,
MSA; and in Jackson County, MO, and Johnson County, KS; first
quarter 1990 to first quarter 2007

                                                     United States
Entity
                                                     1990          2007

Total employment                              106,906,249   133,366,015

  Private industry                             88,984,929   111,789,312
      Natural resources and mining              1,541,047     1,645,929
      Construction (1)                          4,902,522     7,189,693
      Manufacturing (1)                        17,744,180    13,852,854
      Trade, transportation, and utilities     22,210,624    25,921,763
      Information (2)                           2,747,807     3,001,585
      Financial activities                      6,744,585     8,122,203
      Professional and business                10,167,155    17,458,885
        services (1,2)
      Education and health services            10,484,056    17,196,609
      Leisure and hospitality                   8,968,747    12,725,870
      Other services (1)                        3,401,356     4,349,856
  Government                                   17,920,470    21,576,703
    Federal                                     3,164,514     2,711,241
    State (1,2)                                 3,949,724     4,598,953
    Local (1,2)                                10,806,232    14,266,509

                                               Jackson County, Missouri

                                                    1,990         2,007

Total employment                                  359,866       364,529

  Private industry                                301,681       301,695
      Natural resources and mining                    351           216
      Construction                                 13,104        19,109
      Manufacturing                                39,820        27,100
      Trade, transportation, and utilities         71,726        63,808
      Information                                  22,489        17,133
      Financial activities                         31,569        32,249
      Professional and business services           39,749        51,782
      Education and health services                40,253        44,334
      Leisure and hospitality                      30,346        34,064
      Other services                               12,275        11,901
  Government                                       58,186        62,833
    Federal                                        20,919        16,961
    State                                           6,164         7,630
    Local                                          31,103        38,242

                                                      United States
Entity
                                                                Percent
                                               Net change        change

Total employment                               26,459,766          24.8

  Private industry                             22,804,383          25.6
      Natural resources and mining                104,882           6.8
      Construction (1)                          2,287,171          46.7
      Manufacturing (1)                        -3,891,326         -21.9
      Trade, transportation, and utilities      3,711,139          16.7
      Information (2)                             253,778           9.2
      Financial activities                      1,377,618          20.4
      Professional and business                 7,291,730          71.7
        services (1,2)
      Education and health services             6,712,553          64.0
      Leisure and hospitality                   3,757,123          41.9
      Other services (1)                          948,500          27.9
  Government                                    3,656,233          20.4
    Federal                                      -453,273         -14.3
    State (1,2)                                   649,229          16.4
    Local (1,2)                                 3,460,277          32.0

                                               Jackson County, Missouri

                                               Net change       Percent
                                                                 change

Total employment                                    4,663           1.3

  Private industry                                     14           0.0
      Natural resources and mining                   -135         -38.5
      Construction                                  6,005          45.8
      Manufacturing                               -12,720         -31.9
      Trade, transportation, and utilities         -7,918         -11.0
      Information                                  -5,356         -23.8
      Financial activities                            680           2.2
      Professional and business services           12,033          30.3
      Education and health services                 4,081          10.1
      Leisure and hospitality                       3,718          12.3
      Other services                                 -374          -3.0
  Government                                        4,647           8.0
    Federal                                        -3,958         -18.9
    State                                           1,466          23.8
    Local                                           7,139          23.0

                                                       Kansas City MSA
Entity
                                                     1990          2007

Total employment                                  769,480       966,555

  Private industry                                646,004       816,458
      Natural resources and mining                  1,745         2,117
      Construction (1)                             26,836        48,671
      Manufacturing (1)                            95,164        83,127
      Trade, transportation, and utilities        183,694       200,350
      Information (2)                              34,698        41,868
      Financial activities                         60,794        73,487
      Professional and business                    80,497       140,440
        services (1,2)
      Education and health services                72,421       108,665
      Leisure and hospitality                      63,790        90,984
      Other services (1)                           22,932        26,704
  Government                                      122,945       148,020
    Federal                                        32,755        27,013
    State (1,2)                                    17,040        15,932
    Local (1,2)                                    73,150       105,075

                                                 Johnson County, Kansas

                                                    1,990         2,007

Total employment                                  184,024       309,321

  Private industry                                165,668       279,699
      Natural resources and mining                    217           451
      Construction                                  8,134        13,881
      Manufacturing                                20,055        21,551
      Trade, transportation, and utilities         49,165        65,089
      Information                                   9,791        22,287
      Financial activities                         17,993        28,787
      Professional and business services           25,742        59,912
      Education and health services                13,872        33,284
      Leisure and hospitality                      15,508        26,646
      Other services                                5,191         7,811
  Government                                       18,356        29,623
    Federal                                         3,216         3,039
    State                                             932           742
    Local                                          14,208        25,842

                                                     Kansas City MSA
Entity
                                                                Percent
                                               Net change        change

Total employment                                  197,075          25.6

  Private industry                                170,454          26.4
      Natural resources and mining                    372          21.3
      Construction (1)                             21,835          81.4
      Manufacturing (1)                           -12,037         -12.6
      Trade, transportation, and utilities         16,656           9.1
      Information (2)                               7,170          20.7
      Financial activities                         12,693          20.9
      Professional and business                    59,943          74.5
        services (1,2)
      Education and health services                36,244          50.0
      Leisure and hospitality                      27,194          42.6
      Other services (1)                            3,772          16.4
  Government                                       25,075          20.4
    Federal                                        -5,742         -17.5
    State (1,2)                                    -1,108          -6.5
    Local (1,2)                                    31,925          43.6

                                                 Johnson County, Kansas

                                               Net change       Percent
                                                                 change

Total employment                                  125,297          68.1

  Private industry                                114,031          68.8
      Natural resources and mining                    234         107.8
      Construction                                  5,747          70.7
      Manufacturing                                 1,496           7.5
      Trade, transportation, and utilities         15,924          32.4
      Information                                  12,496         127.6
      Financial activities                         10,794          60.0
      Professional and business services           34,170         132.7
      Education and health services                19,412         139.9
      Leisure and hospitality                      11,138          71.8
      Other services                                2,620          50.5
  Government                                       11,267          61.4
    Federal                                          -177          -5.5
    State                                            -190         -20.4
    Local                                          11,634          81.9

(1) Data on industries in some counties of the Kansas City, Mo-KS,
MSA were not published for the first quarter of 1990.

  MSA data for construction exclude Wyandotte County, Kansas.

  MSA data for manufacturing exclude Caldwell County, Missouri.

  MSA data for professional and business services exclude Linn
County, Kansas.

  MSA data for other services exclude Caldwell County, Missouri.

  MSA data for State and local government exclude Caldwell County,
Missouri.

(2) Data on industries in some counties of the Kansas City, Mo-KS,
MSA were not published for the first quarter of 2007.

  MSA data for information exclude Linn County, Kansas.

  MSA data for professional and business services exclude Linn
County, Kansas.

  MSA data for State and local government exclude Miami County,
Kansas.

SOURCE: Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages

Table 4. Employment and employment change in each supersector and in
industry groups, sectors, and subsectors with large differences in net
employment change between Jackson County, MO, and Johnson County, KS,
first quarter 1990 to first quarter 2007

      Supersector, sector, subsector,              Jackson County,
             or industry group                        Missouri

                                                               Net
                                                 2007        change,
                                               employment   1990-2007

Natural resources and mining                       216         -135
  Mining                                            42          -71
  Crop production                                  128          -39
Construction                                    19,109        6,005
  Nonresidential building construction           2,828        1,369
  Building equipment contractors                 5,443        1,622
  Building finishing contractors                 2,948          684
  Residential building construction              1,252          290
  Utility system construction                      744          406
Manufacturing                                   27,100      -12,720
  Other fabricated metal product
    manufacturing                                5,513       -3,651
  Paper manufacturing                            1,983         -586
  Medical equipment and supplies
    manufacturing                                  607         -341
  Printing and related support activities        1,893       -1,360
  Semiconductor and electronic
    component manufacturing                        536          315
Trade, transportation, and utilities            63,808       -7,918
  Commercial equip. merchant wholesalers         1,384       -1,213
  Electronic shopping and mail-order houses        283       -1,512
  Clothing stores                                2,533         -240
  Grocery and related product wholesalers        1,185         -196
  Other general merchandise stores               3,663        1,421
Information                                     17,133       -5,356
  Wired telecommunications carriers              4,663       -5,244
  Newspaper, book, and directory publishers      5,463       -3,477
  Data processing and related services           4,647        3,174
  Software publishers                              147           79
  Broadcasting, except Internet                  1,002          262
Financial activities                            32,249          680
  Depository credit intermediation               4,536       -3,358
  Insurance agencies, brokerages,
    and related                                  4,350        1,052
  Insurance carriers                             5,938       -1,158
  Other financial investment activities          2,487           54
  Activities related to real estate              1,694          718
Professional and business services              51,782       12,033
  Employment services                            6,600        1,153
  Computer systems design and
    related services                             1,860          887
  Management and technical
    consulting services                          1,250          482
  Services to buildings and dwellings            5,211          235
  Architectural and engineering services         6,163        2,329
Education and health services                   44,334        4,081
  Medical and diagnostic laboratories              663         -178
  Offices of physicians                          5,521          343
  Nursing care facilities                        4,038           49
  Home health care services                      1,896        1,270
  Outpatient care centers                        1,164         -614
Leisure and hospitality                         34,064        3,718
  Full-service restaurants                      12,348        4,233
  Special food services                          1,307       -1,283
  Drinking places, alcoholic beverages           1,032         -846
  Limited-service eating places                 10,766        1,029
  Performing arts companies                        582          -57
Other services                                  11,901         -374
  Personal care services                         1,401         -104
  Professional and similar organizations         1,761         -219
  Electronic equipment repair and
    maintenance                                    191         -102
  Automotive repair and maintenance              2,224          -65
  Civic and social organizations                 1,431          358

      Supersector, sector, subsector,             Johnson County,
             or industry group                       Kansas

                                                              Net
                                                 2007       change,
                                               employment   1990-2007

Natural resources and mining                       451          234
  Mining                                           323          145
  Crop production                                   90           76
Construction                                    13,881        5,747
  Nonresidential building construction           1,514          378
  Building equipment contractors                 3,991        2,268
  Building finishing contractors                 2,258        1,086
  Residential building construction              1,599          621
  Utility system construction                      695          143
Manufacturing                                   21,551        1,496
  Other fabricated metal product
    manufacturing                                  243           53
  Paper manufacturing                            1,357          595
  Medical equipment and supplies
    manufacturing                                  763          399
  Printing and related support activities        2,795         -628
  Semiconductor and electronic
    component manufacturing                        235         -335
Trade, transportation, and utilities            65,089       15,924
  Commercial equip. merchant wholesalers         2,611        1,095
  Electronic shopping and mail-order houses        388          -94
  Clothing stores                                3,075        1,154
  Grocery and related product wholesalers        2,270        1,159
  Other general merchandise stores               3,913        2,610
Information                                     22,287       12,496
  Wired telecommunications carriers             17,130       11,328
  Newspaper, book, and directory publishers      1,336         -135
  Data processing and related services           1,115          552
  Software publishers                            1,030          432
  Broadcasting, except Internet                    662           87
Financial activities                            28,787       10,794
  Depository credit intermediation               5,398        2,782
  Insurance agencies, brokerages,
    and related                                  6,409        3,382
  Insurance carriers                             5,636          -36
  Other financial investment activities          1,261        1,059
  Activities related to real estate              2,203        1,273
Professional and business services              59,912       34,170
  Employment services                           11,842        9,592
  Computer systems design and
    related services                             5,684        4,879
  Management and technical
    consulting services                          5,037        3,525
  Services to buildings and dwellings            4,601        1,939
  Architectural and engineering services         7,558        3,743
Education and health services                   33,284       19,412
  Medical and diagnostic laboratories            3,163        2,835
  Offices of physicians                          5,364        2,851
  Nursing care facilities                        2,972        1,337
  Home health care services                        789          132
  Outpatient care centers                          402           11
Leisure and hospitality                         26,646       11,138
  Full-service restaurants                      11,836        7,295
  Special food services                            578          424
  Drinking places, alcoholic beverages             675          462
  Limited-service eating places                  8,002        1,149
  Performing arts companies                        233           -2
Other services                                   7,811        2,620
  Personal care services                         2,392        1,190
  Professional and similar organizations           812          274
  Electronic equipment repair and
    maintenance                                    515          227
  Automotive repair and maintenance              1,276          240
  Civic and social organizations                   823          655

SOURCE: Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages
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No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
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Article Details
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Title Annotation:Kansas City Area Employment Growth
Author:Michael-Midkiff, Jacqueline; Nickisch, Linda; Yocum, Cassandra
Publication:Monthly Labor Review
Geographic Code:1U4MO
Date:Sep 1, 2009
Words:11218
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