Printer Friendly

Editors' acknowledgments.

In fact, the whole of Japan is a pure invention.--Oscar Wilde, "The Decay of Dying"

This special issue of the Review of Contemporary Fiction could not have been assembled without the assistance of many different people, Americans and Japanese, translators, transcribers, advisors, and so forth. A big domo arigato first of all to all the authors included here for their willingness to meet with us and talk about their lives and writing seriously. Also indispensable to this project were our Japanese colleagues and pomo enthusiasts, Yoshiaki Koshikawa, Yoshiaki Sato, and Toshifumi Miyawaki who--with the assistance of their wives, Kazuko, Jinko, and Hisami--helped us arrange to meet with several of these authors and who also accompanied us during the interviews themselves, serving as both intermediaries and translators during the q & a sessions, and in some instances, as transcribers and translators of the interviews. Takayuki Tatsumi's wife and co-spirator, Mari Kotani, not only attended and contributed to most of the interviews included here, but was always the perfect hostess during several later visits by McCaffery and Gregory to Japan; her warmth, good humor, and keen knowledge of recent developments in Japanese literature were absolutely essential to the completion of this project.

We'd also like to acknowledge the ongoing encouragement and insights provided by numerous Japanese and American academic specialists in contemporary literature, including Jerry Griswold, Dan McLeod, William T. Vollmann, and Tateo Imamura. Assisting with the translations and transcriptions were Takafumi Akimoto, Reiko Tochigi, Pam Hasman, and Hisayo Ogushi; Hisayo Ogushi also wrote several of the individual author introductions. A special word of thanks also goes out to Takashi Yamaguchi, chauffeur extraordinaire and good buddy, who also took us to several of Tokyo's hippest nightspots, pipe bars, and Mexican restaurants. National Endowments for the Humanities funding in the form of a summer fellowship allowed Sinda Gregory and Larry McCaffery to spend several months in Tokyo in 1992, during which this project began. The San Diego State University Foundation and the College of Arts and Letters also provided minigrants which funded the transcription of several of these interviews, while the College of Arts and Letters granted Gregory a sabbatical leave and McCaffery a leave of absence which permitted them to spend the fall of 1998 in Tokyo, where they completed work on this project.

We would also like to thank the Japan Foundation for its generous support of this issue.

Our thanks, too, to all the authors and translators included here for granting us permission--without any payment at all--for use of the English translations of the following works:

"Soft Clocks," by Yoshio Aramaki was originally published in Japanese as "Yawarakai Tokei," and first appeared in the Japanese SF fanzine Uchujin (The Cosmic Dust, April 1968), reappeared in a revised form in the Japanese monthly, Hayakawa's SF Magazine (February 1972), and was later reprinted in his collection called Shirakabe no Moji wa Yuhi ni Haeru (The Writing on the White Wall Shines in the Setting Sun, Tokyo: Hayakawa, 1972); the stylized English version by Lewis Shiner (translated by Kazuko Behrens) originally was published in the British bimonthly SF magazine Interzone 27 (January/February 1989).

"Oedipus City," by Kiyoshi Kasai, translated by Kazuko Behrens and stylized by Larry McCaffery and Sinda Gregory, was originally published in Japanese as "Edipusu no Machi" in Hayakawa's SF Magazine (August 1984) and then reprinted in his collection by the same name, Edipusu no Machi (Tokyo: Kodansha, 1987).

"The Human Factor," by Goro Masaki and translated by K. Odani and Steven Ayres, is an excerpt from his novella Evil Eyes, which was originally published in Japanese in Hayakawa's SF Magazine (January 1988) and then later included in his collection by the same name, Evil Eyes (Tokyo: Hayakawa, 1988).

"Murder in Balloon Town," by Yumi Matsuo was originally published in Japanese as "Baruun Taun no Satsujin" in Hayakawa's SF Magazine (March 1992) and later reprinted in her collection by the same name, Baruun Taun no Satsujin (Tokyo: Hayakawa, 1994). Translated by Amanda Seaman, [c] 1998.

"Mental Female," by Mariko O'Hara, translated by Kazuko Behrens and Gene van Troyer and stylized by Michael Keezing, originally was published in Japanese as "Mentaru Fiimeeru" in Hayakawa's SF Magazine (December 1985) and later reprinted in her collection by the same name, Mentaru Fiimeeru (Tokyo: Hayakawa, 1988).

"Stalled at a Kiss," by Masahiko Shimada and translated by Kenneth Richard, is an excerpt from his novel, Master and Discipline, which was originally published in Japanese as Higan Sensei (Tokyo: Fukutake, 1992).

"Time Warp Complex," by Yoriko Shono, was originally published in Japanese as "Taimu Surippu Kombinaato" in Bungei-Shunju's literary monthly Bungaku-kai (June 1994) and later included in her collection by the same name, Taimu Surippu Kombinaato (Tokyo: Bungei-Shunju, 1994); the English translation by Adam Fuller, with assistance from Takahashi Yuriko and Ito Nobuji, first appeared in the Japan PEN Club's Japanese Literature Today (1995).

"The Rumors about Me," by Yasutaka Tsutsui, was originally published in Japanese as "Ore ni Kansuru Uwasa" in Shosetsu Shincho (August 1972) and later reprinted in his collection by the same name Ore ni Kansuru Uwasa (Tokyo: Shinchosha, 1974); the English translation by David Lewis originally appeared in The African Time Bomb and Other Stories (Tokyo: Kodansha, 1986).

Dedication

For Ken Akiyama, Masao Shimura, and Shigeru Koike--for their many personal and professional contributions to Japanese-American understanding and friendship
COPYRIGHT 2002 Review of Contemporary Fiction
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2002 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:The Review of Contemporary Fiction
Date:Jun 22, 2002
Words:886
Previous Article:Books received.
Next Article:The Japanoid Manifesto: Toward a New Poetics of Invisible Culture.


Related Articles
Documenting charitable deductions.
Jesus dropped.
The saddhu responds.
19th North American Mushroom conference sponsorship levels & benefits.
19th North American Mushroom Conference sponsorship levels & benefits.
19th North American mushroom conference sponsorship levels & benefits.
19th North American Mushroom conference sponsorship levels & benefits.
Dear editor--acknowledgment: re: STTI comments August 2007.

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2020 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters