Printer Friendly

Eat what you can and can what you can't.

EAT WHAT YOU CAN AND CAN WHAT YOU CAN'T

When harvest time comes around, most people have a squirrel-like instinct to take advantage of the oversupply in garden, orchard, or market and store up for winter. Memories of day-long sessions in hot, steaming kitchens like those our mothers and grandmothers used to contend with--when pecks of apples and pears, and bushels of tomatoes and corn were brought to the kitchen door to be put up--make most people feel that canning must be done wholesale or not at all. Not so. It is possible and also enjoyable to can or freeze in small batches.

There are many advantages to canning and freezing your own fruits and vegetables. Besides the inevitable feeling of satisfaction, you have the distinct advantage of knowing the source of these foods and being able to regulate the amount of sugar and salt added to them. You can be certain the food contains no harmful preservatives. Because evidence increasingly suggests that highly refined sugar, used in large quantities, is injurious to health, we will suggest ways to avoid using it.

Canning in small quantities is easy and pleasant. In the first place, you are doing it because you want to, not because you have to. In the second place, canning or freezing two to four pints at a time is never tiring and can usually be done along with other kitchen chores. The possibility of error is thus greatly reduced.

Home canning requires little more equipment than that found in an everyday kitchen, so when the spirit moves or when a neighbor drops by with garden extras, you can easily pop such produce into can or freezer.

Certain vegetables and fruits are more successfully canned than frozen, and others are better frozen than canned.

The secret of success is to never overwhelm yourself with large quantities of anything--containers, kettles, or produce. Too much will only cause confusion. Buy half-pint and pint jars by the dozen so that you are always prepared. If you have a small cleared area on either side of the sink and another near the stove, you may can or freeze with ease. If you lack these, a small table on wheels will provide extra work space.

Prepare just two to four half-pint or pint containers at a time, and before you know it you will have a wonderful array of fruits and vegetables that will add interest to winter menus.

Italian Tomato Wedges

(Makes 5 pints)

5 pounds tomatoes 1/2 pound Vidalia onions, sliced thin 2 sweet green peppers, sliced into 1/4" strips 5 teaspoons Italian seasoning 1-1/4 teaspoons parsley

Prepare home canning jars and lids according to manufacturer's instructions.

Peel, core, and quarter tomatoes. In large saucepot combine tomatoes, sliced onions, and pepper strips. Bring to boil and boil 5 minutes. Pack into hot jars; leave 1" head space. Add 1 teaspoon Italian seasoning and 1/4 teaspoon parsley to each jar. Cover with boiling water; leave 1" head space. Remove air bubbles. Adjust caps. Process 30 minutes at 10 pounds pressure in pressure canner.

Tomato Wedge and Zucchini

(Makes about 6 quart jars)

6 quarts cored, peeled, and quartered tomatoes, about 14 pounds 2 quarts sliced zucchini, about 2-1/2 pounds 2 quarts onion rings, about 1 pound 2 cups water 2 teaspoons basil 2 teaspoons oregano 1/2 teaspoon thyme

Prepare home canning jars and lids according to manufacturer's instructions.

Combine all ingredients in large pot. Bring mixture to boil. Reduce heat and simmer 5 minutes. Pack vegetables into hot jars; leave 1" head space. Carefully ladle hot liquid over vegetables; leave 1" head space. Remove air bubbles. Adjust caps. Process 40 minutes at 10 pounds pressure in pressure canner.

Hot Pickle Mix

(Makes 7 1-1/2-pint jars)

2-1/2 cups peeled pickling onions, about 1 pound 2 cups 1/2" carrot slices, about 4 large 2 cups 1/2" celery slices 2 cups 1/2" sweet yellow pepper squares, about 2 medium 2 cups 1/2" sweet red pepper squares, about 2 medium 1 cup 1/2" sweet green pepper squares, about 1 medium 6 pounds zucchini, cut into 1/2" chunks 7 jalapeno peppers 1-1/2 cups canning salt 4 quarts water 10 cups vinegar 2 cups water 1/4 cup sugar 2 tablespoons prepared horseradish 2 cloves garlic

Prepare home canning jars and lids according to manufacturer's instructions.

Place first 8 ingredients in large container. Dissolve salt in 4 quarts water. Pour over vegetables and let stand 1 hour. Combine vinegar, 2 cups water, sugar, horseradish, and garlic. Simmer 15 minutes. Remove garlic. Drain vegetables. While wearing rubber gloves, place 3-4 slits in each jalapeno pepper.

Pack vegetables into hot jars; leave 1/4" head space. Add 1 jalapeno pepper to each jar. Carefully ladle hot liquid over vegetables; leave 1/4" head space. Remove air bubbles. Adjust caps. Process 10 minutes in boiling water bath canner.

Peas and Carrots with Chives

Fresh peas, about 1 pound per pint jar Carrots, about 1 pound per pint jar Salt Fresh chives

Prepare home canning jars and lids according to manufacturer's instructions.

Wash, drain, and shell fresh peas. Wash and drain shelled peas. Wash and scrape carrots, then wash again. Cut carrots into 1/2" coins. Combine peas and carrots in saucepan, cover with boiling water, and boil 5 minutes. Pack vegetables in hot jars; leave 1" head space. Add 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1 tablespoon snipped chives to each pint jar. Carefully add boiling water or cooking liquid to vegetables; leave 1" head space. Remove air bubbles with nonmetallic spatula. Adjust caps. Process pints 40 minutes at 10 pounds pressure in pressure canner.

Apple Relish

(Makes about 4 pint jars)

2 pounds tart red apples 2 pounds Granny Smith apples 1-1/2 cups cider vinegar 1 cup brown sugar 1 cup raisins 3/4 cup chopped onion 3/4 cup chopped celery

Prepare home canning jars and lids according to manufacturer's instructions.

Pare, core, and chop apples. Measure 4 cups chopped apples for each variety. Combine all ingredients in large saucepot. Bring mixture to boil. Reduce heat and simmer 45 minutes. Pack into hot jars; leave 1/4" head space. Adjust caps. Process 15 minutes in boiling water bath canner.

Summer Delight

(Makes 7 1-1/2-pint jars)

7 pounds peaches 1-1/2 pounds cherries 1 cantaloupe 2 fresh pineapples 4-1/2 cups cranberry juice 7 cinnamon sticks

Prepare home canning jars and lids according to manufacturer's instructions.

Peel and pit peaches; slice into quarters. Place into soaking solution to prevent darkening. Pit cherries; set aside. Halve cantaloupe and remove seeds. Cut cantaloupe into balls with melon baller or cut into 1" cubes; set aside. Pare pineapple, remove eyes, and core. Cut into 1" wedges.

Place cranberry juice in saucepot and bring to boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat. Keep juice hot. Fill large saucepot half full with water. Bring to boil over high heat. Drain peaches. Add small amount of each fruit to water and simmer 3-5 minutes or until hot through. Drain fruit and pack variety into hot jars; leave 1/2" head space. Add 1 cinnamon stick to each jar. Carefully ladle hot juice over fruit; leave 1/2" head space. Remove air bubbles. Adjust caps. Process 20 minutes in boiling water bath canner.

Peppered Corn

Fresh corn on the cob 1 sweet green pepper, chopped 1 sweet red pepper, chopped

Prepare home canning jars and lids according to manufacturer's instructions.

Husk corn; remove silk. Wash. Cut corn from cob. Do not scrape. Add 1 tablespoon green pepper, 1 tablespoon red pepper, and 1 cup boiling water to each pint of corn--or 2 tablespoons green pepper, 2 tablespoons red pepper, and 2 cups boiling water to each quart of corn. Pack into hot jars; leave 1" head space. Remove air bubbles with nonmetallic spatula. Adjust caps.

Process pints 55 minutes, quarts 1 hour and 25 minutes, at 10 pounds pressure in pressure canner.

Cinnamon Spiced Pineapple

in Pineapple Juice

1 fresh pineapple per pint Cinnamon sticks Unsweetened pineapple juice

Prepare home canning jars and lids according to manufacturer's instructions.

Pare pineapple; remove eyes and core. Cut into 1" chunks. Cook pineapple chunks in water until heated through. Drain and pack into hot jars; leave 1/2" head space. Add 1 cinnamon stick per jar. Heat pineapple juice just to boiling. Carefully pour over pineapple; leave 1/2" head space. Remove air bubbles with nonmetallic spatula. Adjust caps. Process 15 minutes in boiling water bath canner.

Green Beans Oregano

(Makes about 6 pint jars)

6 pounds green beans 1 medium onion, sliced and separated into rings White pepper Oregano

Prepare home canning jars and lids according to manufacturer's instructions.

Wash and drain beans. Remove strings and cut or break into pieces. Combine green beans and onion rings; cover with boiling water. Boil 5 minutes. Pack into hot jars; leave 1" head space. Carefully cover with boiling water; leave 1" head space. Add 1/8 teaspoon white pepper and 1/4 teaspoon oregano. Remove air bubbles with nonmetallic spatula. Adjust caps. Process pints 20 minutes at 10 pounds pressure in pressure canner.

Honey Almond Carrots

(Makes about 6 quart jars)

8 pounds carrots 6 cups water 3 cups orange juice 3/4 cup honey 1/2 cup orange peel 1/3 cup sliced almonds 1 tablespoon crystallized ginger

Prepare canning jars and lids according to manufacturer's instructions.

Peel and slice carrots. Prepare syrup by combining water, orange juice, and honey in saucepan. Cook over medium heat until hot through. Keep syrup hot. Pack carrots into hot jars; leave 1" head space. Divide orange peel, sliced almonds, and crystallized ginger evenly among jars. Pour hot syrup over carrots; leave 1" head space. Remove air bubbles. Adjust caps. Process 30 minutes at 10 pounds pressure in pressure canner.
COPYRIGHT 1990 Saturday Evening Post Society
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1990 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:includes recipes; home canning
Author:Turgeon, Charlotte
Publication:Saturday Evening Post
Date:Oct 1, 1990
Words:1641
Previous Article:The Presbyterians' dynamic new leader.
Next Article:Warming up to Alaska.
Topics:


Related Articles
Poor man's salmon: there's nothing wrong with suckers - if you know how to can them.
Puttin' up pawpaws.
Culture clash confuses canners; who are you going to believe, Grandma, or the USDA?
Advice on safe canning.
Cautious canning counsel.
Canning 101.
Bring Nutrition Back to Your Table by Mixing Up Your Recipes.
Canning is fun--and easy. Invite some friends over and follow our beginner's guide to capturing your summer in a jar.
Canning ABCs: invest in a few tools and learn the basic techniques, and you're on your way.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2017 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters