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Early treatment of growth hormone safe for infants with chronic kidney failure--study.

Infants with chronic renal failure (CRF) grow slowly, a problem that usually improves with aggressive nutritional therapy. When it doesn't, growth hormone is a safe and effective treatment to promote growth, according to a new study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN).

The Spanish-Portuguese multicenter collaborative study included 16 infants with CRF who had continued growth retardation despite nutritional therapy. All the infants were receiving dialysis or other conservative treatments for their chronic kidney disease (CKD). One group of infants received growth hormone while the other did not. During the yearlong study, infants treated with growth hormone grew an average of 5.7 inches, compared to 3.7 inches in those who did not receive growth hormone.

Equally, important, growth hormone caused no harmful effects such as early bone maturation, progression of kidney disease, or metabolic abnormalities. The researchers also reported several key indictors of nutrition and bone growth were similar between groups.

"Early treatment with growth hormone improves growth retardation and bone mineral density without short-term desirable effects," observed the lead author Fernando Santos, MD, PhD, of the Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Oviedo, Spain. "Growth hormone is an additional tool to avoid aggravation impairment with this group of patients."
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Publication:Transplant News
Date:Jul 1, 2010
Words:211
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