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EXECUTIVES SEE 'PARENT TRACKING' AS WAVE OF FUTURE Survey Shows High Sensitivity to Balance of Work and Family

 EXECUTIVES SEE 'PARENT TRACKING' AS WAVE OF FUTURE
 Survey Shows High Sensitivity to Balance of Work and Family
 MENLO PARK, Calif., Dec. 11 /PRNewswire/ -- A recent survey of executives at major U.S. companies reveals that they feel employees want a greater balance between family and career -- a trend which has been widely referred to as "parent tracking" -- and believe organizations should accommodate these desires.
 The survey was developed by Robert Half International, the world's largest personnel firm in the accounting, finance and information systems fields. It was conducted by an independent research firm, which polled 200 executives from the nation's 1,000 largest companies.
 Among the survey highlights:
 -- A full 92 percent of executives feel employees in general are more concerned with balancing family duties and jobs today than they were five years ago.
 -- Nearly half (49 percent) said the number of ambitious executives willing to work long hours on a fast career track has decreased over the same time period, with the overwhelming reason (59 percent) being a desire for more time with family.
 -- More than two-thirds (68 percent) said companies should offer a "parent track," or slower career path, to allow a working parent more family time.
 -- Two-thirds (66 percent) think male executives will be more likely to take advantage of paternity leave options five years from now. (A 1990 Robert Half survey showed that while 31 percent of companies offered paternity leave, only 1 percent of eligible employees took advantage of it.)
 Max Messmer, chairman of Robert Half International, said the survey shows that corporate policy-makers are beginning to acknowledge the changing priorities of today's workforce.
 "A survey we conducted in June 1989, among a nationwide sample of 1000 men and women, showed that 78 percent would choose a slower career 'parent track' if given the opportunity," said Messmer. "Since then, the concept has received wide visibility and highlighted the fact that men want to shoulder greater responsibility in rearing their families.
 "Those companies that lead the way in instituting progressive new policies to accommodate 'parent tracking' will gain an advantage in attracting and keeping the highest quality employees."
 Messmer cautioned that new corporate policies will only be effective if they are based on a sincere belief that employees who select a slower career advancement can be as valuable a resource as those who choose a faster track.
 "The corporate culture must be based on recognition of a person's overall contributions to the organization -- not just on how many hours he or she is willing to work," Messmer said. "Many men and women can even increase the value of those contributions once they achieve the personal satisfaction and security that a balanced work and home life can provide."
 There are 150 Robert Half offices throughout the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom and Europe.
 NOTE TO EDITORS: Here are the detailed results of the Robert Half International "parent tracking" survey:
 1. Do you feel today's employees are more concerned or less concerned with balancing family duties and their jobs than they were five years ago?
 More concerned 92 percent
 Less concerned 2
 No change 6
 2. Do you feel the number of ambitious executives who prefer a fast track requiring long work hours has generally increased or decreased over the last five years?
 Decreased 49 percent
 Increased 25
 Stayed the same 26
 3. If decreased, what is the cause?
 Desire for more family time 59 percent
 Desire for more time to oneself 12
 Desire for more socializing 4
 Health concerns 1
 Other 24
 4. Do you believe the "parent track," or a slower career path to allow a working parent more family time, is something companies should offer their employees?
 Yes 68 percent
 No 25
 Don't know 7
 5. In general, do you think male executives will be more likely or less likely to take advantage of paternity leave options five years from now?
 More likely 66 percent
 Less likely 22
 No change/Don't know 12
 -0- 12/10/91
 /CONTACT: Lynn Taylor, 415-854-9700 or Marc Silbert, 516-767-3700 both of Robert Half International/ CO: Robert Half International ST: California IN: SU:


DG -- SF001 -- 1298 12/11/91 08:01 EST
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Copyright 1991 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

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Date:Dec 11, 1991
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