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EXCLUSIVE AD AGE INTERNATIONAL/YANKELOVICH SURVEY REVEALS CONSUMERS WILL BUY OUTSIDE GOODS, BUT LIKE LOCAL ADS

 EXCLUSIVE AD AGE INTERNATIONAL/YANKELOVICH SURVEY REVEALS CONSUMERS
 WILL BUY OUTSIDE GOODS, BUT LIKE LOCAL ADS
 NEW YORK, April 27 /PRNewswire/ -- Coca-Cola is the most purchased soft drink in Europe's major markets, but its advertising is often not the most liked, according to a new Advertising Age International/ Yankelovich survey.
 The survey of consumers in France, Germany and the United Kingdom found that Europeans welcome brands from other countries but, when it comes to advertising, they prefer the home-grown variety.
 Thirty-two percent of the French respondents said Coca-Cola was the soft drink they bought most often, but the highest percentage (25 percent) named as their favorite commercial the award-winning spot for France's Perrier bottled water, in which a woman outroars a lion atop a mountain. Only 14 percent selected Coca-Cola advertising.
 In Germany, 14 percent said Coca-Cola was their primary non- alcoholic refreshment beverage. A slightly higher percentage (15 percent) said their favorite advertising was for a German brand, Binding Brewery's Clausthaler non-alcoholic beer.
 In the United Kingdom, however, Coca-Cola was the favorite soft drink (named by 26 percent) and so was its advertising (19 percent).
 The findings suggest that "good advertising" is a necessary but insufficient determinant of marketplace success.
 The survey, commissioned by Advertising Age International, was conducted by Yankelovich Clancy Shulman and its affiliates Euroresearch, London; Recherces & Strategies, Paris; and RMM, Hamburg. It is believed to be the first survey to examine brand equity and loyalty across countries.
 As the 12 members of the European Community prepare for a single market officially starting Jan. 1, it appears most consumers are more than ready to buy brands from other nations.
 When asked which of four statements was the single most important consideration in their purchasing decisions, 49 percent said "good value for the money" and 39 percent selected "a quality product/a brand I know and trust."
 The French were the most concerned about value, with 51 percent citing "value." But nearly half (48 percent each) in the United Kingdom and Germany also cited value as the most important consideration.
 "Quality" ranked highest in the United Kingdom, identified by 46 percent of respondents, and lowest in Germany, cited by 33 percent.
 Only 5 percent said it was important that "the product is made in my country." Availability also rated low: only 7 percent said it was important the product be easily located.
 The Ad Age International survey showed U.K. consumers stand out in their commitment to specific brands and in the openness to imported brand names, particularly U.S. products.
 U.K. consumers are the most loyal to a brand. Some 74 percent said that once they found a brand, it was difficult to get them to change to another.
 Even when the appeal of a competitor's advertising is strong, it doesn't necessarily get consumers to buy, the results indicated.
 Overall, 60 percent of respondents said they were reluctant to switch once they found a brand they liked.
 The least loyalty was shown in Germany, where consumers said a known and trusted brand name has little to no influence.
 In contrast, 78 percent of respondents in the United Kingdom said a known and trusted brand strongly or moderately influences their purchase decision.
 Although U.K. consumers are the most loyal once they've selected a brand, they're not likely to see much difference between competing brands. About 70 percent said brands are all about the same, compared with 59 percent in France and 50 percent in Germany.
 The Ad Age International/Yankelovich international brand survey, conducted between Feb. 23 and April 13, consisted of personal five- minute interviews with 605 respondents, all at least 18 years old. They had to have viewed commercial TV in the week before the interview. Survey guidelines ensured a distribution of age, income and geography within each country.
 The populations of the surveyed countries represent 51 percent of Western European consumers.
 -0- 4/27/92
 /CONTACT: Meryl Suben of Advertising Age International, 212-210-0716/ CO: Advertising Age International ST: New York IN: ADV SU: ECO


GK-OS -- NY050 -- 3106 04/27/92 11:45 EDT
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Date:Apr 27, 1992
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