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EVIDENCE SHOWS THAT PASSENGER ELECTRONICS DEVICES DO NOT INTERFERE WITH AIRCRAFT FUNCTIONS

 WASHINGTON, March 8 /PRNewswire/ -- According to the Electronic Industries Association's Consumer Electronics Group (EIA/CEG), consumer electronics products such as compact disc players or videogames, do not interfere with airline navigational and communication systems.
 In 1988, after several years of study, the Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics (RTCA) found no evidence that these products caused interference to airline navigational systems. The commission tested many products including a portable compact disc player.
 In addition, an analysis of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Aviation Reporting System (NASA ASRS) provides almost no evidence that use of electronics devices by passengers contributes to communication or navigational interference. The NASA ASRS is comprised of 43,394 full-form records on in-flight situations of concern submitted voluntarily by pilots. Only 40 of the records mention consumer electronics devices and only half of these concern speculation that the cause of interference might be a consumer electronics device. Even these incidents have decreased over the past few years to two in 1992, while the use of laptop computers and portable electronics devices have skyrocketed.
 "Given the overwhelming evidence and the facts on emissions from consumer electronics devices it is ludicrous to ban the use of these products during flight," said Gary J. Shapiro, EIA/CEG vice president. "Flying is not fun for most passengers. Laptop computers, portable cassette players and video games allow passengers to make the most out of their plane trips."
 The EIA/CEG accepts the current policy whereby electronics device use is not allowed while an aircraft is taking off or landing and looks forward to working with the RTCA to develop criteria for safe operation of portable electronics devices on board aircraft.
 According to USA Today, even the FAA is reassuring fliers that there is no problem. "We don't want people to think every time they use an electronic piece of equipment on planes that there's a risk. It is simply not the case," said the FAA's Tony Broderick.
 The Electronic Industries Association's Consumer Electronics Group is the 69-year-old Washington-based trade association representing most major U.S. manufacturers of audio, video, home office and mobile electronics products, as well as accessories, and assistive devices for people with disabilities.
 -0- 3/8/93
 /CONTACT: Cynthia S. Upson or Alan Haber of the Electronic Industries Association, 202-457-8728/


CO: Electronic Industries Association ST: District of Columbia IN: CPR AIR SU:

DC -- DC004 -- 3844 03/08/93 09:07 EST
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Date:Mar 8, 1993
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