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EPA SELECTS CLEAN-UP ACTION FOR GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATION AT ROCKAWAY TOWNSHIP; WELLFIELD SUPERFUND SITE IN MORRIS COUNTY, N.J.

 NEW YORK, Oct. 5 /PRNewswire/ -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has selected a clean-up action for groundwater contamination at the Rockaway Township Wellfield Superfund site in Morris County, N.J., that will extract, treat, and discharge the groundwater, and replace a deteriorated air stripper at the wellfield. The remedy will cost $9.8 million to construct and operate. It is the first of two clean-up actions planned for the Superfund site. The second action will involve an investigation of potential contaminant sources and a remedy that will limit the impact of these sources, if necessary. Superfund is the federal program to address hazardous waste sites.
 Acting EPA Regional Administrator William J. Muszynski said, "The remedy is aimed at protecting a town's water supply and is an important step to protect public health. The extracted groundwater will be treated to achieve stringent federal and New Jersey standards; then reinjected into the aquifer to the extent needed to promote groundwater restoration.
 "This remedy was developed cooperatively by EPA and the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and Energy," Mr. Muszynski added.
 NJDEPE held a public meeting on July 14, 1993, and a public comment period from June 30 to Aug. 30, 1993 on the clean-up plan.
 Site Description
 The Rockaway Township Wells site is a two-square-mile well field area containing a cluster of three municipal wells within 100 feet of each other. In 1979 and 1980, the wells were found to contain a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Two gasoline service stations, freight and transit facilities, and industrial properties are located near the well field. Groundwater contamination in the area appears to have resulted from several sources, including the gasoline stations and industrial facilities. Monitoring wells in the area indicated widespread contamination by chlorinated solvents and fuel components. In 1980, a treatment system for the combined pumping of the wells was installed and included an air stripping unit and an activated carbon system. Presently, only the air stripping unit is in operation. Only one of the three wells is currently in operation.
 -0- 10/5/93
 /CONTACT: Rich Cahill of the EPA, 212-264-2515/


CO: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ST: New York, New Jersey IN: ENV SU:

PS -- NY049 -- 8866 10/05/93 12:40 EDT
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Oct 5, 1993
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