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EPA COMPLETES CLEANUP OF HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS IN ABANDONED STOVE FACTORY IN WILLIAMSBURGH SECTION OF BROOKLYN, N.Y.

 EPA COMPLETES CLEANUP OF HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS IN ABANDONED STOVE
 FACTORY IN WILLIAMSBURGH SECTION OF BROOKLYN, N.Y.
 NEW YORK, July 27 /PRNewswire/ -- The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has completed an emergency cleanup of hazardous chemicals improperly stored in a building on Wallabout Street in Williamsburgh, Brooklyn that were left behind when the Slattery Brothers Stove Co. became defunct in 1990. EPA's action, which ended last month, was performed under its Superfund authority in response to requests from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) and the New York City Department of Environmental Protection (NYCDEP). Superfund is the federal program to address inactive or abandoned hazardous waste sites across the country.
 EPA Regional Administrator Constantine Sidamon-Eristoff said "The chemicals and conditions inside the building had created a high potential for a release of dangerous substances into the environment." Eristoff further stated "There are three public schools within 1/4 mile of the site, and thousands of residents in nearby apartments and private homes. Had a major fire occurred in the building and involved the chemicals that were abandoned there, all of these citizens would have been at risk from exposure to smoke and toxic fumes. Our thanks go to the City Fire and Police Departments for their assistance and cooperation during the course of this removal action."
 The Slattery Stove site consists of two buildings, one of which contained large volumes of hazardous substances. This building was used by squatters and drug users and was subjected to a number of arson fires. The building was also in a state of advanced disrepair since being abandoned, and many floors, walls and ceilings were on the verge of collapse when EPA began its action last December.
 During the course of its action, EPA provided 24-hour security guards and secured doors to prevent unauthorized access. EPA then began the removal of more than 2,000 gallons of acid and 2,000 gallons of caustics, plus hundreds of gallons of flammable liquids. In addition to the liquid chemicals, EPA removed thousands of pounds of metallic paint pigments, oxidizers, paint chemicals and bagged asbestos.
 The removal action was financed through Superfund, and cost in excess of $300,000 to complete.
 -0- 7/27/92
 /CONTACT: Rich Cahill of the EPA, 212-264-2515/ CO: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ST: New York IN: SU:


SH -- NY083 -- 3566 07/27/92 13:42 EDT
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Jul 27, 1992
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