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ENVIRONMENTALLY-SOUND MANUAL LAWN MOWERS INCREASE IN DEMAND 30 PERCENT

 ENVIRONMENTALLY-SOUND MANUAL LAWN MOWERS
 INCREASE IN DEMAND 30 PERCENT
 SHELBYVILLE, Ind., March 24 /PRNewswire/ -- The increasingly popular, environmentally-sound way to mow grass is with a "reel" lawn mower. The manual, push mower with no engine yields no emissions since it is human powered. There's no loud roar to disturb neighbors, just a soothing thwap, thwap, thwap. And horticulturists say the fine spray of clippings left by the reel mower are good for the lawn -- thus no need to fill landfills with bags of grass.
 In 1991 demand for reel mowers handcrafted by the American Lawn Mower Company/Great States Corporation increased 30 percent -- 135 percent since 1985. American has been manufacturing the mowers, its sole product, for nearly 100 years.
 No need to bag the clippings left by reel mowers. Reel mowers snip grass precisely, like a pair of scissors, and disperses the grass in a fine spray -- not a clump -- that decomposes quickly.
 According to Dick Crum, horticulturist with the Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service, "The reel mower cut is clean and even. With the reel mower you can leave the clippings on the lawn. Leaving the clippings on the grass adds up to one free application of fertilizer. We know from university research that grass clippings contain nitrogen, and nitrogen is the thing that fuels grass growth."
 Leaving the clippings on the yard is called "grasscycling."
 Environmentally-sound lawn care isn't a passing fad. In some area it's now law.
 In December of 1990, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) adopted emissions standards to reduce the emission levels of lawn and garden and utility engines by 46 percent by 1994 and an additional 55 percent by 1999. Sacramento and San Antonio noise pollution laws include eliminating power mower noise on Sunday mornings.
 Six states and Washington have enacted laws banning the disposal of yard waste in landfills: Florida, Illinois, Iowa, Massachusetts, Minnesota and Missouri. By 1995, Michigan, North Carolina, Ohio and Wisconsin will also have banned yard waste. Georgia and Washington have municipalities that ban yard waste from landfills, and several states promote leaving grass clippings on lawns.
 Yard waste, including grass clippings, now accounts for 20 percent of landfill tonnage. Since grass clippings are 90 percent water by weight, if clippings are sent to an incinerator, it takes more energy to burn them than can be recovered for power generation. It also takes truck space and fuel to haul them.
 Environmental sensitivity isn't the only reason demand for American's reel mowers has increased. Other factors: benefits to the lawn, practicality, economy and safety.
 According to Crum, "Reel lawn mowers yield greener grass because of the clean and even cut that seals in vital fluids.
 Rotary mower blades tend to turn lawns brown for a few day after mowing. Ragged cuts cause grass blades to dry and leave a larger area of tissue vulnerable to disease organisms."
 Golf course greenskeepers have long used reel lawn mowers for lush, smooth, greener greens.
 Reel mowers are recommended for yards of 1/2-acre or less and for trimming. They average under $100, and are much safer than power mowers.
 Today's reel mowers, weighing only 16 to 31 pounds, are also lighter and easier to push, lift and store than our grandfather's that weighed 40 to 60 pounds. They cut as fast as you walk and stop when you do. American's mowers are easy to maintain since they can be sharpened at home by even the most novice do-it-yourselfers.
 American's reel mowers cut every type of turf grass. One specific model, the deluxe/light mower, cleanly cuts even the thick-bladed St. Augustine grass. And the seven-blade bent-grass mower is designed for Bermuda and other low-creeping grasses. On rough, hilly lawns, five- bladed reel mowers with cast iron wheels are recommended. (American handcrafts nine different models.)
 Reel lawn mowers manufactured by American/Great States may be found at a variety of retailers coast to coast. For information call 317-392-3615, or send a self-addressed stamped envelope to American Lawn Mower Company, P.O. Box 369, Shelbyville, IN 46176.
 -0- 3/24/92
 /NOTE TO EDITORS: Media, TV or radio kit and photos available./
 /CONTACT: Ann Woolman or Karen Roberts of CRE Public Relations, 317-631-0260, or fax, 317-631-0272, ext. 66, for American Lawn Mower/ CO: American Lawn Mower Company ST: Indiana IN: SU: PDT


SM -- NYEFNS10 -- 0845 03/24/92 07:00 EST
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Date:Mar 24, 1992
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