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ENVIRONMENTAL GROUP BUYS RIGHTS TO SULFUR DIOXIDE EMISSIONS IN BATTLE AGAINST POLLUTION

 CLEVELAND, March 25 /PRNewswire/ -- A private environmental group has set out to buy Clean Air Act rights to sulfur dioxide (S02) emissions to prevent their use by business to pollute.
 The group, INHALE, a non-profit organization set up for the purpose, says it is purchasing the rights (beginning March 29) when these permits are auctioned on the Chicago Board of Trade.
 "We are literally buying pollution," said David B. Webster, president of National Healthy Air License Exchange, which uses the acronym INHALE. "Never before have individuals had this much power to affect their environment."
 The Clean Air Act Amendment of 1990 allows fossil fuel burning industries to buy and sell permits to release sulfur dioxide into the atmosphere.
 The Environmental Protection Administration is allowing permits, worth one ton of S02, to be traded on the Chicago Board of Trade. Industries that have reduced emissions below their quotas can sell their permits to industries that exceed pollutant standards, giving them more
 The strategy of INHALE is a creative reply to a bold move by the EPA in making a free market in pollution. The permits are supposed to give financial incentives and flexibility to industry as they respond to stricter pollution quotas. Some industries, especially older factories in the Midwest, may find it cheaper to stockpile permits than to clean up.
 In buying the permits, INHALE can reduce the number of permits on the market, and also drive up the value of the remaining permits. Since INHALE is a non-profit corporation, industries will also have the opportunity to donate their excess permits instead of selling them to another polluter. Industries that do so will also reap substantial tax advantages.
 "We have a chance to stop pollution before it happens," said Webster, an attorney from Cleveland. INHALE is headquartered in Cleveland, and has a diverse and active membership, and donors from across the country. The organization is working to raise awareness levels about pollution standards as well as to raise the capital necessary to purchase pollution permits and retire them.
 "Short of changing our own consumption habits, INHALE is the most direct way to stop air pollution," Webster said.
 -0- 3/25/93 R
 /EDITOR'S NOTE: Webster will be available for interviews. He will also attend a Chicago Board of Trade news conference, board of trade boardroom, 10 a.m., March 30 and can be interviewed before or after that event./
 /CONTACT: Lauren Ogan of Logan & Company, for National Healthy Air License Exchange, 216-621-7522/


CO: National Healthy Air License Exchange ST: Ohio IN: SU:

LC -- CLFNS4R -- 9422 03/25/93 09:20 EST
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Date:Mar 25, 1993
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