Printer Friendly

EMPLOYEE TURNOVER DECLINES FOR THIRD STRAIGHT YEAR; ABSENCE RATE AT RECORD LOW IN 1992, BNA SURVEY FINDS

 WASHINGTON, March 26 /PRNewswire/ -- Economic conditions again kept employees from changing jobs or taking time off in 1992, suggests the latest Quarterly Report on Job Absence and Turnover published by The Bureau of National Affairs, Inc. Rates of employee turnover fell for the third straight year, to their lowest level since the survey's inception in 1974. For a second consecutive year, employers reported record-low incidence of job absence. Both absence and turnover rates have declined fairly steadily since the onset of the 1990-91 recession. BNA is a leading publisher of information services covering employee relations, business and economics, law, taxation, the environment and other public policy issues.
 Turnover
 Median rates of permanent separation -- excluding departures of temporary staff and layoffs -- averaged 0.7 percent of employers' work forces per month (8.4 percent per year) in 1992. The year-end average is down from 0.8 percent per month (9.6 percent annually) in 1991, 0.9 percent (10.8 percent per year) in 1990, and 1.1 percent (13.2 percent annually) in 1989. Furthermore, in 1992:
 -- Turnover remained lowest among manufacturing firms (0.5 percent per month) and highest in the "non-business" sector (0.9 percent), which includes health care, education and government institutions. As in the past, turnover was particularly high among health care organizations (1.2 percent). Median rates of permanent separation averaged 0.8 percent of the work force per month in the non-manufacturing sector.
 -- By work force size, turnover was lowest among both the smallest (fewer than 250 employees) and largest (2,500 or more workers) employers in 1992, averaging 0.6 percent per month among both groups. Separation rates were highest in firms with 250 to 499 workers (averaging 0.9 percent per month), and companies with 500 to 2,499 employees lost an average of 0.7 percent of their work forces each month last year.
 -- The average of median turnover rates fell one-tenth of a point from 1991 among Southern (to 0.7 percent per month) and North Central (0.6 percent) employers. Following two years of substantial decline in separation rates, year-end averages in the Northeast (0.8 percent per month) and the West (0.9 percent) rose one-tenth of a point from a year ago.
 Seasonal patterns in employee separations during 1992 were similar to those observed in previous years. Turnover again was lowest in the fourth-quarter months, plummeting among non- manufacturing businesses. The highest rates of permanent separation were reported in mid-year -- between April and August.
 Median rates of absence averaged 1.6 percent of scheduled workdays during 1992, down from 1.7 percent in 1991 and 1.8 percent in each year from 1986 to 1990. The decline in unscheduled absenteeism in 1992 was generally broad-based, occurring in all but a few industry, size and region classifications:
 -- The major exception to the downward trend was in the non- business sector and its health care subgroup, where median absence rates averaged 2.0 percent and 1.8 percent of scheduled workdays, respectively, both up two-tenths of a point from 1991. Median absence rates among manufacturing firms and non-manufacturing businesses (1.5 percent each) were well below these levels.
 -- As in previous years, smaller firms reported the lowest rates of absenteeism. Employers with fewer than 500 workers lost an average of 1.4 percent of scheduled workdays during 1992, and companies with 500 to 999 employees experienced absence rates averaging 1.5 percent. Unscheduled absenteeism was substantially higher among organizations with 1,000 or more workers (1.9 percent) in 1992.
 -- Following two years of steady decline, the year-end average of median absence rates among Northeastern firms leveled off at 1.6 percent. Companies in the South reported sharp declines in worker absenteeism (from 1.9 percent to 1.6 percent), while rates were down one-tenth of a point from a year ago among both North Central (to 1.5 percent) and Western (1.6 percent) employers.
 The decline in the year-end average of median absence rates for 1992 is primarily attributable to lower rates in the first and fourth quarters of last year. Absenteeism typically is highest during the late fall and winter months, but this trend was less pronounced in 1992 than in previous years.
 The survey is conducted quarterly among a panel of human resources and employee relations executives representing a cross section of U.S. employers, both public and private. The 1992 figures are based on responses from more than 450 organizations nationwide.
 For further information, contact Mike Reidy at 202-452-4389.
 -0- 3/26/93
 /CONTACT: Mike Reidy of the Bureau of National Affairs, 202-452-4389/


CO: Bureau of National Affairs ST: District of Columbia IN: SU:

KD -- DC005 -- 9977 03/26/93 09:46 EST
COPYRIGHT 1993 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1993 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Mar 26, 1993
Words:789
Previous Article:MCI DONATES STATE-OF-THE-ART TELECOMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT TO CAPITOL COLLEGE
Next Article:MOST AND HONOR AGREE TO DISCUSS MERGER
Topics:


Related Articles
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES SHOW LITTLE IMPROVEMENT; PRODUCTION/SERVICE LAYOFFS CONTINUE TO RISE, BNA SURVEY FINDS
TURNOVER RATES DOWN FOR SECOND CONSECUTIVE YEAR; ABSENCES DECLINE IN 1991, BNA SURVEY FINDS
NEW YEAR UNLIKELY TO BRING DRAMATIC IMPROVEMENT IN JOB PROSPECTS, BNA SURVEY FINDS, REPORTS OF EMPLOYEES ON LAYOFF RISE FOLLOWING TURNDOWN
Labor agreements reported for first three quarters of '92.
WORKERS TOOK A LITTLE MORE TIME OFF IN 1993, BNA SURVEY FINDS
EMPLOYEE TURNOVER EDGED UP IN 1993, BNA SURVEY FINDS
EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK TO IMPROVE IN SUMMER MONTHS, BNA SURVEY FINDS
PURSE STRINGS TIGHTEN FOR MANY HUMAN RESOURCE DEPARTMENTS, SHRM-BNA SURVEY FINDS
JOB PROSPECTS FOR NON-CLERICAL EMPLOYEES MAY SHOW SLIGHT DECLINE, BNA SURVEY FINDS
GRADUAL RISE IN TURNOVER CONTINUED DURING 1994, BNA SURVEY FINDS

Terms of use | Copyright © 2017 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters