Printer Friendly

ELECTRIC CARS APPROACHING REALITY

 ELECTRIC CARS APPROACHING REALITY
 DETROIT, Feb. 27 /PRNewswire/ -- Imagine if every time you hit the


brakes while driving your car some gasoline squirted into the fuel tank. Not very realistic for the cars of today, but for the electrically powered cars of tomorrow, the electric equivalent just may be happening.
 Speaking before the 1992 SAE International Congress and Exposition, Feb. 24-28, in Detroit, researchers from private industry described their designs of regenerative brakes for electric cars. These brakes make the motors on electric vehicles function as generators when the brakes are applied, thus partially recharging the vehicle's batteries.
 Major efforts are under way to develop electric vehicles for the commercial market, partially as a result of California legislation. By 1998, 2 percent of an automaker's sales must be zero emission vehicles, a figure which rises to 10 percent by 2003.
 One of the main problems with electric vehicles is their limited operating range. Currently available batteries don't provide enough storage capacity to power the vehicle for very long, thus the range of an electric vehicle can be extended by recovering energy during braking.
 Current prototype electric vehicles have both regenerative brakes and conventional hydraulic brakes because the regenerative brakes alone don't provide an adequate safety margin. The braking systems have independent controls, thus requiring the driver to choose which system to use.
 In one of the papers presented today, the Italian company BREMBO Kelsey-Hayes described a braking system with a single brake pedal. The two braking systems are activated and disabled in the correct sequence, thus maximizing energy recovery. The hydraulic braking system is activated only when the regenerative braking system is not producing the required deceleration.
 Regenerative braking systems are most beneficial in returning energy to the battery pack of an electric vehicle in driving schedules with frequent starts and stops. Researchers from F.W. Lilly, Inc. and T.C. Wang R & D Laboratory estimated that in low-speed urban driving with stops at one-half mile intervals and a cruising speed of 22 mph, about 20 percent of energy can be saved.
 If the driving intervals rise to 9 miles with a speed of 67 mph, only about 6 percent energy is saved because the brakes are not used as frequently.
 -0- 2/27/92
 /CONTACT: Debra Jacob, 313-393-4400, Ext. 3048, or 412-776-4841, Ext. 456, after Feb. 27, or Barbara Pontello, 412-776-4841, both of SAE/ CO: Society of Automotive Engineers ST: Michigan IN: AUT SU:


SB -- DE009 -- 3160 02/27/92 10:16 EST
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Feb 27, 1992
Words:414
Previous Article:REGENT BANCSHARES REPORTS RESULTS
Next Article:NEW CAR TRANSMISSION ... MORE FUN DRIVING?
Topics:


Related Articles
CHRYSLER SIGNS ELECTROSOURCE
FPL LAUNCHES GM ELECTRIC CAR TEST PROJECT; 60 FORT LAUDERDALE AREA DRIVERS TO PARTICIPATE
FOCUS: Firms vie to develop affordable, emissions-free electric cars.
pounds 30m bid launched for car industry of future; EXCLUSIVE North could be global centre.
GM implements smart charging feature in Volt, keeps release promise by 2010.
UK will become part of trials for electric Mini.
LEAF IT TO NISSAN.
Good engine - nice little blade runner; Engineers called in to make Nissan's new car noisier.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2017 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters