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EDITORIAL SMALLER SCHOOLS.

SUPERINTENDENT Roy Romer and fellow officials at the Los Angeles Unified School District bristle at the suggestion that they've been slow to break down massive, warehouse campuses into smaller, more personal high schools. They're firmly committed to ``small learning communities,'' they say, and don't you dare suggest otherwise.

But seldom is their lofty, highly defensive talk ever backed up by action.

It sure wasn't on Tuesday when Romer unveiled his ``plan'' for smaller campuses. It really wasn't a plan at all - no details, no specifics, just a generic vision to concentrate on a few underperforming schools in the next few years, then see what happens. Meanwhile, the LAUSD continues to build new warehouse campuses at breakneck speed.

It would be nice to see less of this kind of ``commitment'' to small- learning centers in the LAUSD - and more small learning centers, instead.

It would also be nice to see the concept expanded upon to its logical conclusion: If behemoth schools are inferior to smaller, more personal ones, couldn't the same be said for school districts?
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Title Annotation:Editorial
Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Article Type:Editorial
Date:Dec 8, 2005
Words:175
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