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EDISON, DWP CREATE NEW SPARE REFRIGERATOR RECYCLING BUSINESS

 COMPTON, Calif., Nov. 18 /PRNewswire/ -- Southern California Edison and the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (DWP) have joined forces to create a new business in Southern California -- Spare Refrigerator Recycling. The utilities will work with the Appliance Recycling Centers of America (ARCA), which will employ 115 local area residents as part of the utilities' community renewal and job creation efforts.
 At ARCA's new 45,000-square-foot Compton recycling facility, Edison and the DWP will combine to remove nearly 240,000 operating energy inefficient spare operating refrigerators from service, while also recycling tons of ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and destroying polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) through this one-of-a-kind program.
 J. Michael Mendez, Edison's vice president, regional leadership, said, "We're pleased to be the primary force behind creating a new business and more than 100 new jobs in an area that was severely impacted by last year's civil unrest. These jobs will promote energy efficiency and benefit the environment through proper disposal and recycling of spare operating refrigerators. Also, most of these employees will be trained at the Compton job training center Edison helped create as part of its community renewal efforts."
 Edison and the DWP will invest $33 million over the next three years to recover spare operating refrigerators, the ones typically placed in garages and/or patios for supplemental cold storage.
 Edison and DWP customers who recycle their spare operating refrigerators can expect to save an average of $144 a year on their electric bill, depending on the refrigerator's size and age. Customers who qualify to have their spare operating refrigerator picked up will be given a $50 (face value) U.S. Savings Bond.
 Charles W. Montoya, DWP director of marketing and energy services, said that refrigerators generally use about 25 percent of household energy. "This program gives customers a convenient means of getting rid of their spare operating refrigerators, and will help them reduce their electric bills. The program also benefits the environment through the safe removal of CFCs, and the economy through the creation of new jobs."
 Jack Cameron, president of ARCA, said that, "ARCA is proud to be helping support this innovative joint energy management program between Edison and the DWP that has the added benefits of creating jobs and protecting the environment."
 Through the use of its specialized equipment, ARCA is the only facility in the country with the capability to recover CFC-11, an expansion agent found in the polyurethane foam of refrigerator cabinets and doors. In most refrigerators built after 1975, the insulating foam contains CFC-11. At its recycling facility and its downtown Los Angeles customer telephone center, ARCA will employ route managers and assistant route managers, customer service operators, recycling processing operators and supervisory personnel.
 In addition to the energy conservation and environmental benefits, the two utilities expect to annually collect and recycle between 22,700 to 28,000 tons of steel, copper and aluminum.
 Spare operating refrigerators are older, less efficient and under- utilized for the amount of power required to run them. On average, spare operating refrigerators are about 14 years old. When these were built, there either were no federal or state energy efficiency standards or what standards did exist were less strict than today's. For example, 1993 model refrigerators use only about one-third the electricity of equivalent refrigerators built 14 years ago.
 Edison expects to recover 177,000 spare operating refrigerators from its 3.5 million residential customers. The DWP plans to recover 60,000 refrigerators from its 1.36 million residential customers. Edison expects to realize more than 503 million kilowatt hours of energy savings with a demand reduction of 34.4 megawatts. The DWP expects to realize more than 180 million kilowatt hours of energy savings with a demand reduction of 12 megawatts.
 Through this program, the utilities expect to recover between 52-77 tons of CFCs, a substance considered by the state of California to be a hazardous waste because of its stratospheric ozone depletion capability.
 As of January 1994, it will be illegal to dump a large appliance in California landfills without first recovering refrigerants and components. If the refrigerators contain certain substances (such as CFCs) these must first be removed.
 To request pickup of a refrigerator, or for more information, Edison and DWP customers may call toll free 800-234-9722, or 800-234-9710 for the hearing impaired.
 -0- 11/18/93
 /CONTACT: Paul Klein, 909-394-8874 or 818-302-2255, or Carolyn Murray, 909-394-8876 or 818-302-2255, both of Edison; or Darlene Battle, 213-367-1368, or Lucia Alvelais, 213-367-1259, both of DWP/


CO: Southern California Edison; Los Angeles Department of Water
 and Power ST: California IN: UTI ENV SU:


JB-EH -- LA026 -- 6076 11/18/93 13:33 EST
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Date:Nov 18, 1993
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