Printer Friendly

Drink up! ANTIQUES.

Byline: BARGAIN HUNTER DON RODGERS

Both of these drinking vessels hail from Russia and oer a fairly modern take on a traditional Russian craft: creating items out of silver and then decorating them with coloured enamels.

e charming goblet, or vodka cup, is made of silver gilt and decorated with stylised leaves and cherries using the cloisonne technique.

In this method, ne silver wires are soldered onto the body of the vessel to form cells which are then ooded with coloured enamels.

We can tell from the hallmark that this piece was made by the Leningrad Jewellery and Watch Factory. is soviet enterprise was founded in Leningrad, now St Petersburg, in 1953 and produced goods until the late 1970s.

e neness of silver used was 916 parts per thousand, just under the sterling standard of 925.

is might seem like an odd silver standard but it actually harks back to the old Russian hallmarking system, corresponding to 88 zolotnik.

an odd silver standard but it actually harks back to the old Russian hallmarking system, corresponding to 88 zolotnik. e other drinking cup shown here is often referred to as a shot glass, although it too is made of silver and might be better described as a vodka cup.

e other drinking cup shown here is often referred to as a shot glass, although it too is made of silver and might be better described as a vodka cup.

is is one of a pair, its twin being similarly decorated but with white enamel on blue instead of red.

e brilliant blue translu cent enamel covers an engine-turned ground in a e brilliant blue translu cent enamel covers an engine-turned ground in a technique known as guilloche. e most famous name associated with this technique in Russia is of course Faberge.

e modern Faberge company, which isn't owned by the family but by a mining investment group, has recently brought out a range of enamelled silver shot glasses similar in shape to this one but of much higher quality and at a considerably higher price - over $3,000 each, to be precise.

e slight naivety of my pair, which is a million miles away from Faberge, rather appeals to me, as does the eye-catching shade of blue.

e price of Russian artefacts is inuenced by a number of factors. For example, Russian cloisonne enamels temporarily boomed in value in the 1970s because of interest from Iranian buyers due to similarities between Russian and Iranian/Persian enamels.

Today's Market uctuates according to the state of the Russian economy but is generally fairly buoyant. While the shot glasses have suered some damage to the enamels, the goblet is in excellent condition.

I paid PS75 for all three pieces, which represents good value for money, as they're worth around PS100-PS150.

CAPTION(S):

Above, silver <Bgilt and enamel goblet. Left, blue and red enamel shot glass
COPYRIGHT 2014 MGN Ltd.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2014 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:Features
Publication:Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales)
Geographic Code:4EXRU
Date:Jun 14, 2014
Words:481
Previous Article:Last chance to buy at new Caerphilly site; Move with 5% deposit thanks to Help to Buy Wales.
Next Article:A value-added property.
Topics:

Terms of use | Copyright © 2018 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters