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Door sensor in fatal accident found to have large blind spot.

TOKYO, March 28 Kyodo

A sensor in a revolving door that caused a fatal accident Friday in Tokyo was apparently configured so that its blind spot was not the smallest size possible, sources close to the case said Sunday.

A 6-year-old boy died after getting his head stuck in the revolving door at the Roppongi Hills business and entertainment complex, prompting concerns about the safety of such doors. Ryo Mizokawa got trapped as he rushed into the door just ahead of his 38-year-old mother at the second-floor front entrance of the complex.

Since the boy from Suita, Osaka Prefecture, was 117 centimeters tall, police suspect a motion detector in the door's ceiling was not set at its maximum range of 80 cm from the floor, and the blind spot was not minimized.

The sources said the sensor range is adjustable.

Door manufacturer Sanwa Tajima Corp. and its parent company Sanwa Shutter Corp. earlier said the sensor system between the revolving door and the door frame has a blind spot measuring some 65 cm vertically.

The ceiling sensor's maximum range is 80 cm from the floor, and a sensor in the floor has a maximum range of 15 cm from the ground, they said. The 65 cm in between is thus a blind spot.

The sensor was functioning property at the time of the accident, the sources said.

The manufacturer said in a press conference Saturday that the ceiling sensor's range had a default setting of 80 cm because reducing it could lead to malfunctions.

It also said the door does not halt immediately when motion is detected but continues to move for about 25 cm before stopping.

A sensor in a revolving door that caused a fatal accident Friday in Tokyo was apparently configured so that its blind spot was not the smallest size possible, sources close to the case said Sunday.

A 6-year-old boy died after getting his head stuck in the revolving door at the Roppongi Hills business and entertainment complex, prompting concerns about the safety of such doors. Ryo Mizokawa got trapped as he rushed into the door just ahead of his 38-year-old mother at the second-floor front entrance of the complex.

Since the boy from Suita, Osaka Prefecture, was 117 centimeters tall, police suspect a motion detector in the door's ceiling was not set at its maximum range of 80 cm from the floor, and the blind spot was not minimized.

The sources said the sensor range is adjustable.

Door manufacturer Sanwa Tajima Corp. and its parent company Sanwa Shutter Corp. earlier said the sensor system between the revolving door and the door frame has a blind spot measuring some 65 cm vertically.

The ceiling sensor's maximum range is 80 cm from the floor, and a sensor in the floor has a maximum range of 15 cm from the ground, they said. The 65 cm in between is thus a blind spot.

The sensor was functioning property at the time of the accident, the sources said.

The manufacturer said in a press conference Saturday that the ceiling sensor's range had a default setting of 80 cm because reducing it could lead to malfunctions.

It also said the door does not halt immediately when motion is detected but continues to move for about 25 cm before stopping.
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Publication:Japan Transportation Scan
Date:Mar 29, 2004
Words:550
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