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Don't neglect to check your transplants!

Gardeners should examine any cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower transplants for disease before they plant them in their garden.

"Although transplants may be certified by agencies in some growing states as being disease free, there is no real way for those agencies to make sure each and every plant is free of disease. Gardeners need to check for themselves," said John Hartman, University of Kentucky Extension plant pathologist.

If any transplants have symptoms of disease, don't plant them, Hartman said, because once disease is in the garden, it may spread to other plants.

Hartman offered this list of common diseases gardeners should be inspecting transplants for:

Clubroot: This disease usually shows up as galls or swelling on the side roots of the transplants.

Black leg: Symptoms include ash gray leaf spots or dark gray stem lesions with small black pimple-like fruiting bodies in the plant tissues.

Wire stem: Infected plants show dark colored diseased areas or cankers on the lower stem.

Even the most vigilant gardener may introduce one of these diseases into a garden. To help keep such diseases to a minimum, gardeners also should make sure that the garden is located where there is good drainage and air circulation.

In addition, Hartman suggested rotating crops on a four-year rotation and removing and destroying weeds in and around the garden that may harbor disease.
COPYRIGHT 1993 Countryside Publications Ltd.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1993 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

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Publication:Countryside & Small Stock Journal
Date:May 1, 1993
Words:224
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