Printer Friendly

Does implied volatility contain information about future volatility? Evidence from the Petrobras options market/A volatilidade implicita contem informacoes sobre a volatilidade futura? Evidencias do mercado de opcoes de acoes da petrobras.

1. INTRODUCTION

Implied volatility is a measure of the expectations of market participants plus a risk premium. If this premium is small or at least constant over time, implied volatility will be a good forward-looking estimator of future volatility. Thus, some economists believe that the use of implied volatility as a forecast of future volatility shows more promising results than that offered by models based on historical data. The aim of this paper is to examine whether implied volatility contains information about future volatility. For this purpose, we examine the relationship between the implied volatility of Petrobras options (calls) and the realized volatility in a subsequent period.

If the rational expectations hypothesis is correct and markets are efficient, then implied volatility should contain significant information about future volatility. Various studies have tried to determine the best estimator of future volatility. Different results have been obtained, with arguments in favor of both the use of implied volatility and historical volatility.

Day & Lewis (1992) and Lamoureux & Lastrapes (1993) concluded that implied volatility is a biased and inefficient forecast of future volatility and that historical volatility contains more information about future volatility than does implied volatility.

Day & Lewis (1992) studied the S&P 100 index between 1985 and 1989, with an option maturity period of 36 business days. Lamoureux & Lastrapes (1993) focused on the options of the ten most liquid stocks of the S&P 100, between 1982 and 1984, with a time to maturity of 119 business days. Canina & Figlewski (1993) also utilized data on the S&P 100 index before 1987. They observed a more radical result, indicating that the implied volatility has no predictive power regarding future volatility.

Christensen & Prabhala (CP) (1998) studied at-the-money (ATM) call options with one-month maturity on the S&P 100 index using data between 1983 and 1995. Their conclusion is contrary to the results of the above authors. They found that the implied volatility is a better estimator of future volatility than historical volatility, being efficient and less biased in relation to the previous studies, particularly in the period after the 1987 New York Stock Exchange crash.

This event represented a structural break in the stock market and can explain why implied volatility was a biased estimator in the previous studies. CP also indicated some failings in the works of Day & Lewis (1992) and Lamoureux & Lastrapes (1993). Among them is the use of small and overlapping samples of options with maturities longer than one month.

They also argued that the earlier works contained a problem of maturity miss-match, namely the forecasting power of implied volatility was tested only one day ahead by Lamoureux & Lastrapes (1993) and one week ahead by Day & Lewis (1992). In line with CP, Gwilym & Buckle (1999), analyzing data on ATM options on the main United Kingdom stock index, the UK FTSE 100, concluded that implied volatility contains more information on future volatility than the historical volatility.

For the Brazilian market, Gabe & Portugal (2004) used overlapping data from Telemar options in the period from October 2, 2000 to October 10, 2002. They found that the volatility estimated by the GARCH and EGARCH models was an efficient and unbiased estimator, better than implied volatility. On the other hand, Tabak & Chang (2006) showed that the implied volatility of foreign exchange options is a better estimator of future volatility than that obtained via GARCH models.

In this study we revisit this question, based on the Petrobras options market. Since these options did not have good liquidity before 2006, the study examines, besides ATM options, the series corresponding to ITM (in-the-money) and OTM (out-of-the-money) options, in order to increase the database. Additionally, this allows testing separately the information contained in ITM, ATM and OTM options.

Unlike other studies of the Brazilian market, our goal is not to determine the best future volatility forecast, but rather to assess the explanatory power of implied and historical volatilities with respect to future volatility (i).

While the works of Gabe & Portugal (2004) and Tabak & Chang (2006) compared implied volatility with volatility predicted via traditional econometric models, we analyze the relationship between implied and realized volatilities. Therefore, while a bias in implied volatility represents a negative point for these authors, in our approach this is interpreted as a risk premium.

For ITM options, we found no relation between their implied volatility and future volatility, both in level and in log. The implied volatility of ATM options was only significant in the equation in level, but was strongly biased.

The implied volatility of OTM options contained information about realized volatility, both in level and in log, and was efficient and less biased than the implied volatility of ATM options. In the case of the log of the implied volatility of OTM options, the result obtained was similar to those of Christensen & Prabhala (1998) and Gwilym & Buckle (1999), indicating that a forward-looking approach in Brazil can be successfully employed.

The rest of this paper is organized as follows. In Section 2 we present the concepts of implied and realized volatilities. In Section 3 we present the database. In Section 4 we discuss the empirical results. In Section 5 we compare our results with those of other studies. Section 6 concludes.

2. IMPLIED AND REALIZED VOLATILITIES

In finance, volatility corresponds to the standard deviation of an asset's returns. While it is impossible today to know the exact prices of securities in the future, statistical methods and regressions can be utilized to estimate the future volatility of the respective underlying asset. These volatility estimates shed light on the expected future price movements of the asset in question.

An alternative to econometric methods to obtain information about an asset's volatility consists of analyzing the options market. The option price is a direct function of the volatility of its underlying asset. Since this price is observable, one can extract the volatility from it. This requires the use of some pricing model. The most famous of them is undoubtedly the Black & Scholes (BS) (1973) model.

The BS option pricing model consists of an equation that provides the fair price of options through no-arbitrage arguments. The price at t for a European option maturing at T is calculated according to the following expression:

[MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]

Where [c.sub.t] is the theoretical value of a call option, [S.sub.t] is the price of the underlying asset, K is the strike price of the option, [tau] = T - t is the time to maturity, [sigma] is the volatility, [r.sub.f] is the risk-free rate and N is the standard normal cumulative function (ii).

The implied volatility (IV) at t is simply the value of the constant [sigma] which makes the theoretical price of the call option equal to the market price. Although the calls traded on the Sao Paulo Stock Exchange (Bovespa) are American options (they can be exercised at any time before the expiry date), they are protected against dividends (the amounts received as dividends are deducted from the strike price).

Hence, there is no advantage to early exercise and they can be characterized as European options (see Hull, 1997) (iii). However, although the pricing model has an analytic form, there is no closed solution expressing the volatility as a function of the asset price. To solve this problem we used Newton's method.

The realized volatility (RV) between dates t and T is defined as:

[RV.sub.t] = [square root of 1/[tau] [n.summation (i=1)][([r.sub.t+1] - [[bar.r].sub.tT]).sup.2]],

Where n is the number of days between t and T, [r.sub.t+i] is the daily return on day t i and [[bar.r].sub.tT] is the average of the daily returns between t and T. The historical volatility is defined analogously as in the previous equation, but only considering one period before t (in the empirical exercise presented in Section 4, this period, as well as the maturity of the options, is one month).

3. DATABASE

Our empirical study is based on data on the preferred shares of Petrobras (PETR4) and their call options, for the period covering January 2006 to December 2008. The data were obtained from the Bovespa site.

Since this period includes a two-for-one stock split on April 28, 2008, we divided all the stock and strike prices before this date by two. The use of Petrobras shares is due to their high liquidity and substantial participation (around 14%) in the main Brazilian stock index (Ibovespa), allowing their use as a proxy for this index.

Figure 1 presents the monthly returns of preferred Petrobras shares and the Ibovespa (IBOV) between January 2006 and December 2008. Note the high volatility for both series in the period. In October 2008 the American economy suffered the worst of the subprime crisis, causing the failure of large banks and triggering a credit crunch. Thus the global economy was severely affected, leading to a strong capital outflow from emerging markets, negatively influencing the main stock indexes and increasing the risk of investments, primarily in equities.

[FIGURE 1 OMITTED]

In Brazil, there is only liquidity in the market for call options. The options expire monthly on the third Monday of each month.

This market was dominated by Telemar calls until the middle of 2006, after which the shares of Petrobras held by the public (the company is controlled by the Brazilian government) became the most frequently traded shares on the Bovespa and those with the greatest weight in the Ibovespa. Since then the market for Petrobras calls has been the largest in Brazil.

We divided the database into 35 sub-periods (monthly data from January 2006 through December 2008), each one starting on the maturity of the previous series and ending on the last business day before the maturity of the next series, with no overlap. In other words, the options have a term of one month, or approximately 21 business days.

We used the closing prices. To expand the scope of this work, besides ATM options, we also studied OTM and ITM options. In each sub-period we also calculated the realized volatility.

Options can be classified according to their moneyness into three types: in-themoney (ITM), at-the-money (ATM) and out-of-the-money (OTM). There is no fixed definition of these three categories of options. In this study, we defined an ATM option as one whose strike price is nearest the price of the underlying asset, and the ITM and OTM options, respectively, as the options whose strike prices are below and above the ATM.

For example, on January 2, 2007, Petrobras preferred shares closed at R$ 46.74. The option with a strike price nearest this was series PETRA48, with strike equal to R$ 46.77. We thus considered this as ATM.

The first option with a strike price below R$ 46.77 was series PETRA46, with a strike price of R$ 44.77, so we defined this as the ITM option. Likewise, the first option with strike price above R$ 46.77 was PETRA50, with strike equal to R$ 48.19, so we defined it as the OTM option (iv).

In each sub-period we calculated the historical volatility of Petrobras shares and the implied volatility of the ITM, ATM and OTM options on the first day of each sub-period. The realized volatility (RV) was calculated as the standard deviation of the daily returns of the asset over the periods corresponding to the life of each option.

Figure 2 shows the evolution of the implied and realized volatilities in the period studied. Both these are expressed in annual terms. Note that the only period in which the realized volatility was higher than the implied was after July 2008, when the rumors about the financial crisis in the United States started, leading to increased nervousness in global markets.

This fact provides evidence that the options market was not able to anticipate the crisis. According to Hull (1997), after 1987 (after the NYSE crash), the graph of the implied volatilities of a series of equity options tended to form a volatility skew. That is, the higher the strike price of an option, the lower its implied volatility tends to be. One of the reasons given for this phenomenon is leverage.

When the prices of a company's shares decline, its leverage increases as the stock price decreases, and for this reason ITM options tend to have greater implied volatility than ATM and OTM options.

The implied volatilities of the options in our sample behaved with volatility skew until April 2008, when Brazil received an investment grade rating from Standard & Poor's. After this period, the Petrobras options started to have very similar implied volatility.

Table 1 contains the descriptive statistics of the volatility series. The means of the implied volatility series are higher than those of the realized volatility, both in level and in log (indicated by the letter L). Besides this, the difference between the series in level (implied volatility minus realized volatility) is lower than for the series in log.

[FIGURE 2 OMITTED]

The maximum and minimum values of the ITM series are much higher than those of the other options, particularly the minimum value of the ITM IV, which is over four times the minimum of the RV. Note also that the standard deviation of the series in level is higher for the IV series, while in the series in log the realized volatilities have a larger standard deviation.

The series also show problems of asymmetry and kurtosis. All of them have positive asymmetry except the ITM LIV, which is negative, indicating all the series except the ITM LIV series have a long right-hand tail. With respect to kurtosis, the ATM IV, OTM IV, RV and OTM LIV series are leptokurtic (elongated in relation to the normal distribution).

The other series present platykurtic characteristics (flattened in relation to the normal distribution), meaning they are less affected by large oscillations. Also note that the values of the asymmetry and kurtosis statistics are similar in the ATM IV, OTM IV and RV series and very different in the ITM IV series.

We will show later that this fact is in line with the greater explanatory power found in the OTM options. All the volatility series are stationary, according to the results of the augmented Dickey-Fuller test (Dickey & Fuller, 1979), at 1% significance.

To analyze the dynamic properties of the series, we estimated ARFMA (p,d,q) models, in the following form:

[PHI](B)([[DELTA].sup.d][X.sub.t] - [mu]) = [THETA](B)[[epsilon].sub.t],

Where [x.sub.t] represents a series in log of the volatilities (LRV, ITM LIV, ATM LIV and OTM LIV), the parameter [mu] is the mean, [[upsilon].sub.t] is a white noise term, [PHI] and [THETA] are polynomials of order p and q in B, the lag operator, defined by B[x.sub.t] = [x.sub.t-1], and [DELTA] = 1 - B is the first difference operator.

Table 2 presents the results of fitting the ARIMA model. Note that the nonintegrated series fit the volatilities better than the integrated series. With the exception of the LRV series, the coefficients of the ARIMA (1,1,1) model are all non-significant at 5%.

Analysis of the Box-Pierce statistic (Box & Pierce, 1970) with 12 lags (<212) and the Akaike (AIC) and Bayesian (BIC) information criteria (v) showed that the implied volatility series are better adjusted by an AR(2) process, while the realized volatility is better adjusted by an ARMA(1,1) process.

4. EMPIRICAL RESULTS

In this section we first examine whether implied volatility provides information about future volatility. Then we test whether the lagged variables, both for HV and IV, have explanatory power about RV. We should point out that other variables can also influence RV. However, the scope of this paper is to verify whether there is any correlation between IV and RV.

The information content of implied volatility is typically assessed in the literature by estimating a regression of the form:

[RV.sub.t] = a + [beta][IV.sub.t] + [[epsilon].sub.t] (1)

Where RV is the realized volatility and IV is the implied volatility.

From this equation, we can draw some conclusions. First of all, if implied volatility has some predictive power about the realized volatility, then [beta] must be statistically different from zero. Second, if implied volatility is an unbiased forecast of realized volatility, we should find that a = 0 and [beta] = 1. Finally, if implied volatility is efficient, then the residuals must be white noise and not correlated with any variable in the market's information set.

Table 3 presents the results of Equation 1. The implied volatility of the ITM options, both in level and in log, are not relevant to explain the realized volatility. The p-values of the coefficients of IV are very high (0.7650 in level and 0.9728 in log), so the null hypothesis that they are statistically different from zero is rejected.

Regarding the IV of the ATM options, in the regression in level, the intercept is not statistically significant at 5% and [beta] is 0.2380. This value of [beta] shows that the implied volatility was nearly four times greater than the realized volatility in the period observed. Hence, the implied volatility of the ATM options contains information about the future volatility, although this is highly biased ([beta] much smaller than 1). This large difference between implied and realized volatilities can be explained by the high risk premium demanded by investors, showing that in risky environments, options tend to have a high extrinsic value (vi). With the equation in log, the implied volatility coefficient of the ATM options is no longer statistically significant (p-value of 0.1157). In other words, according to the equation, we cannot guarantee that variations in the implied volatility of ATM options have any explanatory power over their realized volatility.

In the regression in level for the OTM options, the value of [beta] is 0.3460, which is statistically significant at 5%. This indicates that the implied volatility represents, on average for the study period, around one-third of the realized volatility. It is noteworthy that the constant, a, is statistically zero. The OTM regressions in log show that a variation of one percentage point in implied volatility on average causes an increase of 0.6121% in realized volatility. Furthermore, the intercept is statistically significant and negative, showing a possible bias in the estimation.

To sum up, the results indicate that the implied volatility of both ATM and OTM options contains information about future volatility. However, the estimators are biased, because a = 0 and [beta] = 1 do not hold in any situation. These conclusions are confirmed by analyzing the adjusted [R.sup.2] coefficient. Adjusted [R.sup.2] denotes the relation between the variation explained by the multiple regression equation and the total variation of the dependent variable considering the number of variables. It is higher for the OTM options and lower for the ITM ones, both in level and in log. The estimators generated by the implied volatilities of the OTM and ATM options (the latter only in level) are efficient, given that their Durbin-Watson statistics are not statistically different from two (vii).

To ascertain whether implied or historical volatility has more explanatory power of future volatility, we first estimated the following regression:

[RV.sub.t] = a + [beta][RV.sub.t-1] + [[epsilon].sub.t] (2)

Table 4 shows the results of Equation 2. It can be seen that the past volatility appears not to contain information about future volatility. The coefficients of the variables RV(-1) and LRV(-1) are not statistically significant at 5%, indicating that past volatility does not help in predicting future volatility.

This result is plausible. Even if today's volatility is strongly influenced by yesterday's, in a highly volatile market like Brazil's, the monthly volatilities are not good predictors of future volatility.

By adding the IV series in Equation 2, we have:

[RV.sub.t] = a + [[beta].sub.1][IV.sub.t] + [[beta].sub.2][RV.sub.t-1] + [[epsilon].sub.t] (3)

Table 5 shows the results of Equation 3. It can be seen that none of the past volatility equations contain any type of information about future volatility, because the coefficients are statistically nil in all of them.

Just as in the article by CP, the use of lagged HV increased the coefficients of the implied volatility series. In the case of the OTM series, the coefficients continued being significant and the adjusted [R.sup.2] increased, indicating greater predictive power of that equation.

Finally, it is important to verify whether the lagged variables of IV help explain future volatility. To do this, we estimated the following regression:

[RV.sub.t] = a + [beta][IV.sub.t-1] + [[epsilon].sub.t] (4)

Table 6 shows the results of Equation 4. It can be seen that only OTM IV series in level lagged by one period has explanatory power about the realized volatility. In the other cases, the coefficients are not statistically significant at 5%.

5. COMPARISON WITH PREVIOUS WORKS

Previous articles have expressed various opinions about the information content of implied volatility in relation to future volatility. Day & Lewis (1992), studying options on the S&P 100 index, and Lamoureux & Lastrapes (1993), working with the ten most liquid stocks in the S&P 100, obtained different results than those found here.

They concluded that historical volatility is a better forecast of future volatility than is implied volatility, which was highly biased and inefficient. Canina & Figlewski (1993), studying options on the S&P 100 index before 1987, also obtained an opposite result to that found in this work: only historical volatility contained information on future volatility.

In contrast, in the Brazilian case historical, volatility appears to have no predictive power about future volatility when dealing with non-overlapping monthly data.

More recently, Christensen & Prabhala (1998) repeated the study of options on the S&P 100 index, utilizing ATM options with monthly maturities, without overlapping data and based on a much larger sample (139 observations). The results found for the period after the 1987 NYSE crash are very similar to those reported here in Equation 1 in relation to the estimator of the IV of OTM options.

In our case, implied volatility outperformed past volatility in forecasting future volatility, being, however, more biased than found by CP. There are other differences with respect to historical volatility and the intercept. CP showed that historical volatility has predictive power, but the intercept was not statistically significant, results opposite to those found in this study. Our results agree with those of Gwilym & Buckle (1999), according to which implied volatility contains more information about the realized volatility than does historical volatility when using call options with onemonth maturity.

The main difference between our study and the others cited above is that the IV series of the options with highest predictive power were the OTM instead of ATM options, as in the previous works.

In Brazil, Gabe & Portugal (2004) concluded that the volatility estimated by different statistical models of the GARCH family produce better forecast of future volatility than implied volatility. It should be noted, however, that GARCH models specify a different regression relation than those studied here.

For the comparison between IV and HV to be more balanced, it is necessary to analyze the information content of volatility through identical models. However, GARCH models consider not only the past volatility, but also other information, such as past returns.

Moreover, the database of Gabe & Portugal (2004) was smaller than ours and contained overlapping data. The reason is that their focus was different than ours. While they aimed to forecast (so that balance mattered little), we focus on analysis of the information content.

6. CONCLUSION

In this paper we compared the explanatory power of implied and historical volatilities in relation to future volatility, using data from the Petrobras call options market. Our results indicate that the implied volatility of OTM options has a higher correlation with future volatility than does historical volatility.

The weak explanatory power of ATM and ITM options reveals either that the volatility risk premium of these options is high or the market has inefficiencies. We found no evidence in the period studied (January 2006 to December 2008) that past volatility has any correlation with future volatility in monthly terms. Therefore, the use of a forward-looking approach, as is the case of the implied volatilities of options, appears to be an alternative to the use of past data.

REFERENCES

BLACK, F.; SCHOLES, M. The Pricing of options and corporate liabilities. Journal of Political Economy, 1973.

BOX, G. P.; PIERCE, D. A. Distribution of residual autocorrelations in autoregressive integrated moving average time series models. Journal of the American Statistical Association, 65, p. 1509-1526, 1970.

CANINA, L.; FIGLEWSKI, S. The Informational content of implied volatility. Review of Financial Studies, v. 6, p. 659-681, 1993.

CHRISTENSEN, B. J.; PRABHALA, N. R. The Relation between implied and realized volatility. Journal of Financial Economics, v. 50, p. 125-150, 1998.

DAY, T.; LEWIS, C. Stock market volatility and the information content of stock index options. Journal of Econometrics, 52, 1992

DICKEY, D. A.; FULLER, W. A. Distribution of the estimators for autoregressive time series with a unit root. Journal of the American Statistical Association, 74, p. 427-431.

FRENCH, K.; SCHWERT, G.W.; STAMBAUGH, R. Expected stock returns and volatility. Journal of Financial Economics, 19, p. 3-30, 1987.

GABE, J.; PORTUGAL, M. S. Volatilidade implicita versus volatilidade estatistica: um exercicio utilizando opcoes e acoes da Telemar S.A. Revista Brasileira de Financas, v. 2, n. 1, p. 47-73, 2004.

GWILYM, O.A.; BUCKLE, M. Volatility forecasting in the framework of the option expiry circle. The European Journal of Finance, 5, 73-94, 1999.

HULL, John C. Options, futures and other derivatives. Upper Saddle River: Prentice-Hall Inc., 1997.

LAMOUREUX, C. G.; LASTRAPES, W. Forecasting stock return variance: towards understanding stochastic implied volatility. Review of Financial Studies, 6. 1993.

TABAK, B. M; CHANG, E. J. Are implied volatilities more informative? The Brazilian real exchange rate case. Applied Financial Economics, 17, 569-576, 2006.

Received in 07/09//2010; revised in 03/11/2010; accept in 08/04/2010

Jose Valentim Machado Vicente ([dagger])

Ibmec-RJ Business School

Tiago de Sousa Guedes ([OMEGA])

Ibmec-RJ Business School

Corresponding authors *:

([dagger]) Ph.D. in Mathematical Economics from the Institute of Pure and Applied Mathematics--IMPA. Professor at Ibmec Business School. Address: Av. Gastao Senges 55 ap. 803 Barra da Tijuca--Rio de Janeiro-RJ. CEP: 22631-280. E-mail: jvalent@terra.com.br Telephone: (21) 2572-0692.

([OMEGA]) Master's in Economics from Ibmec Business School Address: Rua Gomes Carneiro, no.80, 302, Ipanema Rio de Janeiro/RJ 22071-110. E-mail: tguedes84@hotmail.com Telephone: (21) 9801-0654

Editor 's note: This paper was accepted by Antonio Lopo Martinez

(i) Thus, we observed the precautions indicated by CP (no sample overlap, fixed-maturity options).

(ii) In this study we used the CDI (overnight) rate as the risk-free rate, expressed in a base year of 252 business days.

(iii) The options on the S&P 100 index used in CP are also American options, but are not protected for dividends. This introduces a bias into the calculation of the implied volatility via the BS model that does not happen in the case of Petrobras options. Therefore, correction of the errors of the variables used in the regressions, as presented in Section 4 of the CP article, is not necessary here.

(iv) Other more usual moneyness criteria, such as that defined by the option's Delta, require constructing a volatility surface for choosing the ITM, ATM and OTM options. Because of the low number of available options series in our database, the interpolation error on the volatility surface could impair the results.

(v) The information criteria are defined as: AIC = - 2(l/T) + 2(k/T) and BIC = 2(l/T) + klog(T)/T, where l is the value of the likelihood function, k is the number of parameters and T is the sample size.

(vi) An option's value can be divided into an intrinsic and an extrinsic value, or its value in time. The intrinsic value is the difference between the spot price of the underlying asset and the strike price of the call option. The extrinsic price reflects the opportunity cost and market expectations.

(vii) The Durbin-Watson statistic (DW) measures the serial correlation of the residuals. A result near two indicates there is no first-order serial correlation.
Table 1--Descriptive statistics of the volatilities series.

Statistics    IV ITM    IV ATM    IV OTM    RV

Mean          1.1412    0.8035    0.6054    0.3251
Median        1.1583    0.7470    0.5435    0.3042
Maximum       1.6120    1.3681    1.2230    1.0844
Minimum       0.8090    0.5366    0.4032    0.1620
SD            0.2316    0.2100    0.2116    0.1167
Asymmetry     0.2346    1.0516    1.6220    1.1874
Kurtosis      2.0580    3.5236    4.7752    4.2834

Statistics    LIV ITM    LIV ATM    LIV OTM    LRV

Mean          0.1122     -0.2485    -0.5488    -1.1792
Median        0.1469     -0.2917    -0.6097    -1.1899
Maximum       0.4775     0.3135     0.2013     -0.4094
Minimum       -0.2120    -0.6225    -0.9084    -1.8204
SD            0.2044     0.2434     0.2965     0.3345
Asymmetry     -0.0505    0.5728     1.1302     0.3169
Kurtosis      1.9218     2.6419     3.4345     2.8904

Nota: This table presents the descriptive statistics of the
volatility series. Abbreviations: IV: implied volatility;
ITM: in-the-money; ATM: at-the-money; OTM: out-of-the-
money; RV: realized volatility; LIV: log of the implied
volatility; LRV: log of the realized volatility; SD:
standard deviation. Source: elaborate by the authors

Table 2--ARIMA (p,dq) model for implied and realized
volatilities.

Model          [mu]     [[phi].sub.1]   [[phi].sub.1]

ITM LIV

ARMA(1,1)      -0.01    0.56#
AR(1)          -0.01    0.69#
AR(2)          -0.02    0.75#           -0.07
ARIMA(1,1,1)   -0.02    0.09

ATM LIV

ARMA(1,1)      -0.22#   0.22
AR(1)          -0.10    0.64#
AR(2)          -0.11#   0.80#           -0.17
ARIMA(1,1,1)   -0.01    0.04

OTM LIV

ARMA(1,1)      -0.19    0.59#
AR(1)          -0.13    0.72#
AR(2)          -0.12    0.83#           -0.08
ARIMA(1,1,1)   0.00     -0.05

LRV

ARMA(1,1)      0.17#    1.12#
AR(1)          -0.27    0.72#
AR(2)          -0.11    0.56#           0.29
ARIMA(1,1,1)   0.02#    0.45#

Model          [[theta].sub.1]   [Q.sub.12]   AIC     BIC

ITM LIV

ARMA(1,1)      0.23              6.47         0.35    0.48
AR(1)                            6.26         0.30    0.39
AR(2)                            8.59         0.28    0.42
ARIMA(1,1,1)   -0.23             11.21        0.44    0.57

ATM LIV

ARMA(1,1)      0.70#             11.56        -0.04   0.10
AR(1)                            10.22        0.00    0.09
AR(2)                            11.31        -0.08   0.05
ARIMA(1,1,1)   -0.06             9.99         0.13    0.27

OTM LIV

ARMA(1,1)      0.25              12.47        -0.11   0.03
AR(1)                            12.13        -0.14   -0.05
AR(2)                            15.86        -0.20   -0.07
ARIMA(1,1,1)   0.02              17.73        -0.08   0.05

LRV

ARMA(1,1)      -1.00#            14.72        0.60    0.73
AR(1)                            13.87        0.79    0.88
AR(2)                            7.65         0.82    0.95
ARIMA(1,1,1)   -0.97#            12.29        0.67    0.81

Nota: This table presents the estimates of the ARIMA model
for the logs of volatility series (LRV, ITM LIV, ATM LIV and
OTM LIV). Values in boldface indicate that the parameters
are significant at 5%. The AIC and BIC columns represent the
Akaike and Bayesian information criteria, while [Q.sub.12] is
the Box-Pierce statistic. Abbreviations: ITM: in-the-money;
ATM: at-the-money; OTM: out-of-the-money; LIV: log of the
implied volatility; LRV: log of the realized volatility.

Source: elaborate by the authors

Note: Parameters are significant at 5% are indicated with #.

Table 3--Results of Equation 1.

             Variable    Coefficient    Standard    P-value
                                        error

Level ITM    C           0.2889         0.1220      0.0267#
             ITM IV      0.0317         0.1048      0.7650
Level ATM    C           0.1338         0.0868      0.1370
             ATM IV      0.2380         0.1047      0.0327#
Level OTM    C           0.1156         0.0573      0.0554
             OTM IV      0.3460         0.0895      0.0008#
Log ITM      C           -1.1779        0.0783      0.0000
             ITM LIV     -0.0118        0.3412      0.9728
Log ATM      C           -1.0690        0.0934      0.0000#
             ATM LIV     0.4434         0.2713      0.1157
Log OTM      C           -0.8433        0.1227      0.0000#
             OTM LIV     0.6121         0.1976      0.0051

             Variable    Adjusted     DW
                         [R.sup.2]

Level ITM    C           -0.0393      1.2990
             ITM IV
Level ATM    C           0.1479       1.8065
             ATM IV
Level OTM    C           0.3674       2.1264
             OTM IV
Log ITM      C           -0.0344      1.2515
             ITM LIV
Log ATM      C           0.0651       1.6440
             ATM LIV
Log OTM      C           0.2637       1.9768
             OTM LIV

Nota: This table shows the results of Equation 1. The
coefficients in boldface are statistically significant at
5%. Abbreviations: IV: implied volatility; ITM: in-the-
money; ATM: at-the-money; OTM: out-of-the-money; RV:
realized volatility; LIV: log of the implied volatility; DW:
Durbin-Watson statistic. Source: elaborate by the authors

Note: Significant coefficients at 5% are indicated with #.

Table 4--Results of Equation 2

                Variable    Coefficient    Standard    P-value
                                           error

Level RV(-1)    C           -0.7669        0.2668      0.0088
                RV(-1)      0.3485         0.2147      0.1187
Log RV(-1)      C           0.2155         0.0733      0.0076
                LRV(-1)     0.3419         0.2199      0.1343

                Variable    Adjusted     DW
                            [R.sup.2]

Level RV(-1)    C           0.1070       2.0059
                RV(-1)
Log RV(-1)      C           0.0989       2.0337
                LRV(-1)

Nota: This table shows the results of Equation 2. The
coefficients in boldface are statistically significant.
Abbreviations: RV (-1): lag of the realized volatility;
LRV(-1): log of the lag of the realized volatility

DW: Durbin-Watson statistic.

Source: elaborate by the authors

Table 5--Results of Equation 3

             Variable    Coefficient    Standard    P-value
                                        error

             C           0.2227         0.1312      0.1043
Level ITM    ITM IV      -0.0076        0.1133      0.9471
             RV(-l)      0.3468         0.2366      0.1576
             C           0.1064         0.0939      0.2696
Level ATM    ATM IV      0.2446         0.1400      0.0951
             RV(-1)      0.0569         0.2661      0.8328
             C           0.1240         0.0634      0.0640
Level OTM    OTM IV      0.4488         0.1214      0.0013
             RV(-1)      -0.2402        0.2355      0.3193
             C           -0.7036        0.3056      0.0317
Log ITM      ITM LIV     -0.1672        0.3690      0.6550
             LRV(-1)     0.3840         0.2322      0.1131
             C           -0.8791        0.2844      0.0055
Log ATM      ATM LIV     0.3876         0.3520      0.2833
             LRV(-1)     0.1797         0.2629      0.5017
             C           -0.9023        0.2383      0.0011
Log OTM      OTM LIV     0.7418         0.2661      0.0110
             LRV(-1)     -0.0938        0.2458      0.7065

             Variable    Adjusted     DW
                         [R.sup.2]

             C
Level ITM    ITM IV      0.0991       2.0374
             RV(-l)
             C
Level ATM    ATM IV      0.2134       1.9274
             RV(-1)
             C
Level OTM    OTM IV      0.4543       1.7908
             RV(-1)
             C
Log ITM      ITM LIV     0.1156       2.0261
             LRV(-1)
             C
Log ATM      ATM LIV     0.1557       1.9844
             LRV(-1)
             C
Log OTM      OTM LIV     0.3481       1.9400
             LRV(-1)

Nota: This table shows the results of Equation 3. The
statistically significant coefficients are in boldface.
Abbreviations: IV: implied volatility; ITM: in-the-money;
ATM: at-the-money; OTM: out-of-the-money; RV: realized
volatility; LIV: log of the implied volatility RV(-1): lag
of the realized volatility; LRV(-1): log of the lag of the
realized volatility; DW: Durbin-Watson statistic.

Source: elaborate by the authors

Table 6--Results of Equation 4

             Variable       Coefficient    Standard    P-value
                                           error

Level ITM    C              0.3984         0.1340      0.0070
             ITM_IV(-1)     -0.0668        0.1174      0.5753
Level ATM    C              0.1821         0.1098      0.1113
             ATM IV(-1)     0.1812         0.1374      0.2006
Level OTM    C              0.1472         0.0801      0.0797
             OTM_IV(-1)     0.3041         0.1327      0.0319
Log ITM      C              -1.1642        0.0790      0.0000
             ITM_LIV(-1)    -0.2275        0.3707      0.5457
Log ATM      C              -1.0929        0.1121      0.0000
             ATM_LIV(-1)    0.3434         0.3242      0.3010
Log OTM      C              -0.8796        0.1631      0.0000
             OTM_LIV(-1)    0.5287         0.2579      0.0525

             Variable       Adjusted     DW
                            [R.sup.2]

Level ITM    C              0.0144       1.2654
             ITM_IV(-1)
Level ATM    C              0.0733       1.5753
             ATM IV(-1)
Level OTM    C              0.1926       2.0419
             OTM_IV(-1)
Log ITM      C              0.0168       1.2713
             ITM_LIV(-1)
Log ATM      C              0.0485       1.4845
             ATM_LIV(-1)
Log OTM      C              0.1603       1.9268
             OTM_LIV(-1)

Nota:This table shows the results of Equation 4. The
statistically significant coefficients are in boldface.
Abbreviations: IV: implied volatility; ITM: in-the-money;
ATM: at-the-money; OTM: out-the-money; RV: realized
volatility; (-1): lag; LIV: log of the implied volatility;
RV(-1): lag of the realized volatility; LRV(-1): log of the
lag of the realized volatility; DW: Durbin-Watson statistic.

Source: elaborate by the authors


1. INTRODUCAO

volatilidade implicita congrega as expectativas dos Aparticipantes do mercado acrescidas de um premio de risco. Se esse premio for pequeno, ou ao menos constante no tempo, ela sera um bom estimador foward looking da volatilidade realizada no futuro. Dado isso, alguns economistas acreditam que o uso da volatilidade implicita como previsora da volatilidade futura apresenta resultados mais promissores do que o oferecido por modelos baseados em dados historicos.

O objetivo deste trabalho e examinar se a volatilidade implicita possui algum conteudo informacional sobre a volatilidade futura. Para tal, examinamos a relacao entre a volatilidade implicita das opcoes de compra (calls) de Petrobras com a volatilidade realizada em um periodo subsequente.

Se a hipotese das expectativas racionais e verdadeira e os mercados sao eficientes, entao a volatilidade implicita das opcoes deve conter informacoes significantes sobre a volatilidade futura. Diversos estudos tentaram determinar qual o melhor estimador para a volatilidade futura. Diferentes resultados foram alcancados, com argumentos favoraveis tanto a utilizacao da volatilidade implicita, quanto para o uso da volatilidade historica.

Day & Lewis (1992) e Lamoureux & Lastrapes (1993) concluem que a volatilidade implicita e um preditor viesado e ineficiente da volatilidade futura e que a volatilidade historica contem mais informacoes sobre ela (volatilidade futura) do que a volatilidade implicita. Day & Lewis (1992) fizeram o estudo sobre o indice S&P 100, entre 1985-1989, com prazo de maturidade das opcoes de 36 dias uteis.

Ja Lamoureux & Lastrapes (1993) focaram o estudo nas opcoes das dez acoes mais liquidas do indice S&P 100, individualmente, entre 1982-1984, com prazo de 119 dias uteis. Canina & Figlewski (1993) tambem utilizaram dados sobre o indice S&P 100 anteriores a 1987. Eles observaram um resultado mais radical, indicando que a volatilidade implicita nao possui nenhum poder preditivo em relacao a volatilidade futura.

Christensen & Prabhala (CP) (1998) estudaram as opcoes de compra at-themoney (ATM) com maturidade de um mes sobre o indice S&P 100 usando dados entre 1983 e 1995. A conclusao aponta resultados contrarios aos dos autores acima, evidenciando que a volatilidade implicita e um estimador de volatilidade futura melhor que a volatilidade historica, sendo eficiente e menos viesado em relacao a estudos anteriores no periodo pos crash da bolsa de Nova Iorque em 1987. A quebra da Bolsa de Nova Iorque em 1987 pode explicar porque a volatilidade implicita era um estimador mais viesado nos estudos anteriores, pois houve uma quebra estrutural no mercado acionario nessa data. CP apontaram tambem algumas falhas nos trabalhos de Day & Lewis (1992) e Lamoureux & Lastrapes (1993).

Dentre elas, incluem a utilizacao de amostras pequenas e sobrepostas de opcoes com prazos maiores que um mes. Tambem evidenciaram um problema de maturity miss-match, onde o poder de previsao da volatilidade implicita era testado um dia a frente por Lamoureux & Lastrapes (1993) e uma semana a frente no trabalho de Day & Lewis (1992). Em consonancia com CP, Gwilym & Buckle (1999), cujo estudo foi baseado em dados de opcoes ATM sobre o principal indice de acoes ingles, o UK FTSE 100, concluiram que a volatilidade implicita contem mais informacoes sobre a volatilidade futura do que a volatilidade historica.

Na literatura nacional, temos o trabalho de Gabe & Portugal (2004) que usaram dados sobrepostos do mercado de opcoes de Telemar no periodo de 02/10/2000 a 15/10/2002. Eles encontraram que a volatilidade estimada atraves de modelos GARCH e EGARCH e um estimador eficiente, nao viesado e melhor do que a volatilidade implicita. Por outro lado, Tabak & Chang (2006) mostram que a volatilidade implicita das opcoes cambiais e um melhor previsor da volatilidade futura que aquela obtida via modelos GARCH.

Neste estudo retomamos essa questao, tomando como base o mercado de opcoes de Petrobras. Como as opcoes da Petrobras nao possuiam boa liquidez antes de 2006, o estudo analisa, alem das opcoes ATM, as series correspondentes a ITM (in-the-money) e a OTM (out-of-the-money), visando incrementar a base de dados. Adicionalmente, isso permite testar separadamente as informacoes contidas em opcoes ITM, ATM e OTM. Ao contrario dos outros estudos feitos no Brasil, o nosso objetivo nao e determinar o melhor previsor da volatilidade futura, mas sim, avaliar o poder explicativo das volatilidades implicita e historica em relacao a volatilidade futura (i).

Enquanto os trabalhos de Gabe & Portugal (2004) e Tabak & Chang (2006) comparam a volatilidade implicita com a prevista via modelos econometricos tradicionais, nos analisamos a relacao entre a volatilidade implicita e a realizada no futuro. Portanto, enquanto um vies na volatilidade implicita representaria um ponto negativo para esses autores, na nossa abordagem interpreta-lo-iamos como um premio de risco.

No que tange as opcoes ITM, nao encontramos relacao entre a volatilidade implicita delas com a volatilidade futura, tanto no nivel, quanto em log. Ja a volatilidade implicita das opcoes ATM, apenas se mostrou significativa na equacao em nivel, mas sendo bem viesada. A volatilidade implicita das opcoes OTM mostrou possuir informacoes sobre a volatilidade realizada, tanto em nivel, quanto em log, sendo eficiente, e menos viesada do que a volatilidade implicita das opcoes ATM.

No caso do log da volatilidade implicita das opcoes OTM, o resultado obtido foi parecido com os dos estudos de Christensen & Prabhala (1998) e Gwilym & Buckle (1999), indicando que a utilizacao de uma abordagem foward looking no Brasil pode ser empregada com sucesso.

O restante deste estudo esta organizado da seguinte forma. Na Secao 2 apresentamos os conceitos de volatilidades implicita e realizada. Na Secao 3 discutimos a base de dados. A Secao 4 contem a exposicao dos resultados empiricos. Na Secao 5 fazemos uma comparacao dos nossos resultados com outros estudos. A Secao 6 conclui o estudo.

2. VOLATILIDADE IMPLICITA E REALIZADA

Volatilidade, em financas, corresponde ao desvio-padrao de uma amostra de retornos de um ativo. Como e praticamente impossivel conhecer hoje os precos exatos dos titulos mobiliarios no futuro, busca-se, atraves de metodos estatisticos e regressoes, estimar a volatilidade futura do respectivo ativo subjacente.

As estimativas da volatilidade possibilitam vislumbrar a expectativa dos movimentos futuros dos precos do seu ativo.

Uma forma alternativa aos metodos econometricos para se obter informacoes sobre a volatilidade de um ativo consiste em analisar o mercado de opcoes. O premio de uma opcao e funcao direta da volatilidade do ativo. Como o premio e observavel, podemos, a partir deste, extrair a volatilidade.

Para tal e necessario o uso de algum modelo de aprecamento. O mais famoso deles e sem duvida o modelo de Black & Scholes (BS) (1973). O modelo de aprecamento de opcoes de BS consiste em equacoes que visam obter o preco justo das opcoes via argumentos de nao-arbitragem. O premio em t para uma opcao europeia vencendo em T, e calculado de acordo com a seguinte expressao:

[MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII],

Onde [c.sub.t] e valor teorico de uma opcao de compra, [S.sub.t] e preco do ativo-objeto, K e preco de exercicio da opcao, [tau] = T- t e o tempo ate o vencimento, [sigma] e a volatilidade, [r.sub.f] e a taxa livre de risco e N e a funcao cumulativa normal padrao (ii). A volatilidade implicita (VI) em t e simplesmente o valor da constante [sigma] que faz o preco teorico da call igual ao preco de mercado.

Embora as calls negociadas na Bolsa de Valores de Sao Paulo (Bovespa) sejam americanas (podem ser exercidas a qualquer momento entre a abertura da posicao e o vencimento), elas sao protegidas contra proventos (os valores recebidos como proventos sao descontados dos precos de exercicio das opcoes). Portanto nao ha vantagens no exercicio antecipado.

Assim, elas se caracterizam como opcoes europeias (veja Hull, 1997) (iii). Entretanto, embora o modelo de aprecamento tenha uma forma analitica, nao temos uma solucao fechada expressando a volatilidade em funcao do preco do ativo. Para solucionar este problema, foi utilizado o metodo numerico de Newton.

Ja a volatilidade realizada (VR) entre as datas t e T e definida como:

[VR.sub.t] = [square root of 1/[tau] [n.summation over (i=1)] [([r.sub.t+i] - [[bar.r].sub.tT]).sup.2]]

Onde n e o numero de dias entre t e T, [r.sub.t+i] e o retorno diario no dia t + i e [[bar.r].sub.tT] e a media dos retornos diarios entre e T.

A volatilidade historica e definida de forma analoga a equacao anterior, apenas considerando um periodo anterior a t (no exercicio empirico apresentado na Secao 4, esse periodo, assim como o prazo das opcoes, e de um mes).

3. BASE DE DADOS

A analise empirica desse estudo e baseada em dados sobre as acoes preferenciais da Petrobras (PETR4) e de suas opcoes de compra. O periodo observado se estende de janeiro de 2006 ate dezembro de 2008 e os dados foram retirados do site da Bovespa.

Como em 28/04/2008 as acoes da Petrobras sofreram um split (o valor de suas acoes foram divididos por dois e duplicada a quantidade das mesmas), todos os precos e strikes (precos de exercicio) antes desta data foram divididos por dois.

A utilizacao dos ativos da Petrobras se deve a sua elevada liquidez e alta participacao (em torno de 14%) no principal indice de acoes brasileiro (Ibovespa), servindo assim, como uma proxy para o mesmo.

[GRAPHIC 1 OMITTED]

O Grafico 1 apresenta os retornos mensais da Petrobras e do Ibovespa (IBOV) entre janeiro/2006 e dezembro/2008. Note a elevada volatilidade tanto do retorno de Petrobras como do retorno do Ibovespa no periodo.

Em outubro de 2008 a economia norte-americana observou o apice da crise do subprime (titulos imobiliarios de alto risco), levando bancos a falencia e provocando escassez no credito.

Com isso, a economia global se viu debilitada, causando uma forte saida de capital dos paises emergentes, influenciando negativamente o desempenho dos principais indices de acoes e aumentando o risco dos investimentos, principalmente em renda variavel.

No Brasil, somente ha liquidez no mercado de opcoes de compra, que expiram mensalmente na terceira segunda-feira de cada mes.

Vale acentuar que o mercado era dominado pelos ativos da Telemar ate meados de 2006, periodo a partir do qual as acoes em poder do publico correspondentes a participacao acionaria no capital da Petrobras passaram a ser as mais negociadas e com maior peso no Ibovespa. Com isso, o mercado de opcoes de compra de acoes da Petrobras tornou-se o maior do Brasil.

A base de dados foi dividida em 35 sub-periodos (dados mensais entre Janeiro/2006 e Dezembro/2008), cada um comecando no vencimento da serie anterior e terminando no ultimo dia util antes do vencimento da serie seguinte, sem sobreposicao. Ou seja, as opcoes possuem prazo de cerca de um mes ou 21 dias uteis.

Foram utilizados os precos de fechamento. Visando ampliar o escopo do trabalho, alem de opcoes ATM, estudaram-se tambem as OTM e ITM.

Em cada sub-periodo, calculamos tambem a volatilidade realizada. As opcoes podem ser classificadas conforme sua proximidade do dinheiro (moneyness) em tres tipos: in-the-money (ITM), at-the-money (ATM) e out-of-the-money (OTM). Nao existe um conceito fixo para definir em qual das tres modalidades uma opcao se encaixa.

Neste estudo, a opcao ATM foi definida como aquela cujo preco de exercicio esta mais proximo do preco do ativo subjacente.

As opcoes ITM e OTM foram definidas como sendo a primeira nao impar logo abaixo da ATM e a primeira nao impar acima da ATM, respectivamente. Por exemplo, no dia 02/01/2007 a acao de Petrobras fechou cotada em R$ 46,74.

A opcao com preco de exercicio mais proximo de R$ 46,74 e a serie PETRA48, cujo preco de exercicio e igual a R$ 46,77. Esta opcao foi considerada como ATM. A primeira opcao com preco de exercicio nao impar abaixo de R$ 46,77 e a de preco de exercicio igual a R$ 44,77 (serie PETRA46), sendo definida como ITM.

A primeira opcao com preco de exercicio nao impar acima de R$ 46,77 e a de preco de exercicio igual a R$ 48,19 (serie PETRA50), sendo definida como OTM (iv). Em cada sub-periodo foi calculado a volatilidade historica de Petrobras e a volatilidade implicita das opcoes ITM, ATM e OTM no primeiro dia de cada sub-periodo.

A volatilidade realizada (VR) foi calculada como o desvio-padrao dos retornos diarios do ativo ao longo dos periodos correspondentes a vida das opcoes.O Grafico 2 apresenta a evolucao das volatilidades implicitas e da volatilidade realizada no periodo estudado.

Tanto as volatilidades implicitas quanto as realizadas sao expressas em termos anuais Observe que o unico periodo em que a volatilidade realizada e maior que a implicita e apos o mes de julho de 2008, quando comecaram os rumores sobre a crise financeira nos EUA, acarretando um aumento do nervosismo nos mercados mundiais.

Esse fato apresenta evidencias de que o mercado de opcoes nao foi capaz de antecipar a crise. Segundo Hull (1997), a partir de 1987 (apos o crash da bolsa de Nova York), o grafico das volatilidades implicitas de uma serie de opcoes de acoes tendem a formar uma volatility skew.

Isto e, quanto maior o preco de exercicio de uma opcao, menor tende a ser sua volatilidade implicita. Um dos motivos para esse fenomeno seria a alavancagem.

Quando os precos das acoes de uma empresa declinam, sua alavancagem aumenta, ocorrendo o inverso quando os precos sobem. Assim, o risco aumenta conforme o preco das acoes diminui, por isso as opcoes ITM tendem a possuir uma maior volatilidade implicita que as ATM e OTM.

Note que as volatilidades implicitas das opcoes se comportaram com volatility skew ate abril de 2008, quando o Brasil recebeu o titulo de grau de investimento pela agencia de rating Standard & Poor s.

Apos esse periodo, as opcoes passaram a ter uma volatilidade implicita muito parecida. Esse fato pode ser explicado pela diminuicao da percepcao de risco nos investimentos em renda variavel no Brasil.

[GRAPHIC 2 OMITTED]

A Tabela 1 contem as estatisticas descritivas das series de volatilidade. Observamos que as medias das series da volatilidade implicita sao maiores que as da realizada, tanto em nivel, quanto em log (indicadas pela letra L). Alem disso, a diferenca entre as series em nivel (volatilidade implicita menos volatilidade realizada) e menor do que a das series em log.

Os valores maximos e minimos da serie das opcoes ITM sao muito maiores que das outras, merecendo destaque o valor minimo da VI ITM que e mais de quatro vezes o minimo da VR.

Note tambem que o desvio-padrao das series em nivel e maior nas series de volatilidade implicita, enquanto nas series em log as volatilidades realizadas apresentam um maior desvio-padrao.

As series evidenciam problemas de assimetria e curtose. Todas apresentaram assimetria positiva, exceto a LVI ITM, que e negativa, indicando que possuem uma longa cauda a direita, caso oposto ao da serie LVI ITM.

No que tange a curtose, as series VI ATM, VI OTM, VR e LVI OTM sao leptocurticas (alongadas em relacao a distribuicao normal).

As outras series apresentaram caracteristicas platicurticas (achatadas em relacao a distribuicao normal), sendo menos afetadas por grandes oscilacoes. Observa-se tambem que os valores das estatisticas de assimetria e curtose sao parecidos nas series VI ATM, VI OTM e VR e bem diferentes nas series VI ITM. Mais a frente, iremos observar que este fato esta em consonancia com o maior poder explicativo encontrado nas opcoes OTM. Todas as series de volatilidade sao estacionarias, segundo resultados do teste aumentado de Dickey & Fuller (1979), a um nivel de significancia de 1%.

Para analisar as propriedades dinamicas das series de opcoes, nos estimamos modelos ARIMA (p, d, q) da seguinte forma:

[PHI](B)([[delta].sup.d][x.sub.t] - [mu]) = [THETA](B)[[epsilon].sub.t]

Onde [x.sub.t] representa uma serie de log das volatilidades (LVR, LVI ITM, LVI ATM e LVI OTM). O parametro [mu] e a media, [[epsilon].sub.t] e um ruido branco, [PHI] e [THETA] sao polinomios de ordem p e q em B, o operador defasagem, definido por B[x.sub.t] = [x.sub.t-1], e [DELTA] = 1 - B e operador primeira diferenca. A Tabela 2 apresenta os resultados dos ajustes do modelo ARIMA. Observe que as series nao integradas se ajustam melhor as volatilidades do que as series integradas. Com excecao da serie LVR, os coeficientes do modelo ARIMA (1, 1, 1) sao todos insignificantes a 5%. Analisando a estatistica de Box e Pierce (1970) com 12 defasagens ([Q.sub.12]) e os criterios de informacao de Akaike (AIC) e

Bayesiano (BIC) (v) podemos concluir que as series de volatilidade implicita sao melhor ajustadas por um processo AR(2), enquanto que a volatilidade realizada e melhor ajustada por um processo ARMA(1,1).

4. RESULTADOS EMPIRICOS

Nesta secao iremos verificar, primeiramente, se a volatilidade implicita possui informacao sobre a volatilidade futura. Em seguida, iremos testar se variaveis defasadas, tanto da VH, quanto da VI tem algum poder explanatorio em relacao a VR. Vale ressaltar que outras variaveis podem influenciar a VR. No entanto, o escopo do trabalho e verificar se ha correlacao entre VI e VR.A informacao contida na volatilidade implicita em relacao a realizada e, na literatura, tipicamente expressa pela seguinte equacao:

[VR.sub.t] = a + [beta][VI.sub.t] + [[epsilon].sub.t], (1)

Onde VR e a volatilidade realizada e VI a volatilidade implicita.

A partir desta equacao, podemos tirar algumas conclusoes. Primeiramente, se a volatilidade implicita tem algum poder preditivo sobre a realizada, entao [beta] tem que ser estatisticamente diferente de zero. Em segundo lugar, se a volatilidade implicita e um estimador nao viesado da realizada, entao, deve valer: a = 0 e [beta] = 1. Por fim, se a volatilidade implicita e eficiente, entao os residuos devem ser ruidos brancos e nao correlacionados com qualquer variavel da equacao.A Tabela 3 apresenta os resultados da Equacao 1. Observa-se que a volatilidade implicita das opcoes ITM, tanto no nivel, quanto em log, nao sao relevantes para explicar a volatilidade realizada. Os p-valores dos coeficientes da VI sao muito altos (0,7650 em nivel e 0,9728 em log), rejeitando a hipotese nula de que sao estatisticamente diferentes de zero.

Quanto a VI das opcoes ATM, na regressao em nivel, observamos que o intercepto e estatisticamente zero e o [beta] e de 0,2380, sendo significativo a um nivel de significancia de 5%. Esse [beta] mostra que, na media, a volatilidade implicita tende a ser quase quatro vezes maior que a realizada no periodo observado. Logo, a volatilidade implicita das opcoes ATM contem informacoes sobre a volatilidade futura, embora seja bastante viesada ([beta] bem menor que 1).

Essa grande diferenca entre a volatilidade implicita e a realizada, pode ser explicada pelo alto premio de risco exigido pelos investidores, mostrando que em ambientes arriscados as opcoes tendem a possuir alto valor extrinseco (vi).

Com a equacao na forma log, o coeficiente da volatilidade implicita das opcoes ATM passa a nao possuir significancia estatistica (p-valor de 0,1157). Isto e, segundo a equacao, nao podemos garantir que variacoes na volatilidade implicita das opcoes ATM possuam poder explicativo sobre a volatilidade realizada. Utilizando a regressao em nivel com opcoes OTM, notamos um [beta] de 0,3460, sendo estatisticamente significante e indicando que a volatilidade implicita representa, na media do periodo observado, cerca de um terco da realizada. Vale ressaltar que a constante, a, e estatisticamente nula. Ja as regressoes OTM em log, denotam que uma variacao de um ponto percentual na volatilidade implicita, provoca, na media, um aumento de 0,6121% na volatilidade realizada. Alem disso, o intercepto e estatisticamente significativo e negativo, mostrando um possivel vies na estimacao.

Em suma, podemos observar que a VI, tanto das opcoes ATM, quanto das OTM, contem informacoes sobre a volatilidade futura. No entanto, os estimadores sao viesados, pois em nenhuma situacao temos a = 0 e [beta] = 1. Essas conclusoes sao confirmadas quando a analise e feita via coeficiente [R.sup.2] ajustado. O [R.sup.2] ajustado denota a relacao entre a variacao explicada pela equacao de regressao multipla e a variacao total da variavel dependente levando em conta o numero de variaveis.

Observa-se que ele e maior para as OTM e menor para as ITM, tanto em nivel quanto em log. Os estimadores gerados pelas VI's das opcoes OTM e ATM (este somente em nivel) sao eficientes, dado que suas estatisticas Durbin-Watson nao sao estatisticamente diferente de dois (vii). Para comparar quem tem maior poder explicativo sobre a volatilidade futura, entre volatilidade implicita e volatilidade historica, primeiramente estimamos a seguinte regressao:

[VR.sub.t] = a + [beta][VR.sub.t-1] + [[epsilon].sub.t] (2)

A Tabela 4 mostra os resultados da Equacao 2. Nela observamos que a volatilidade passada parece nao possuir informacoes sobre a volatilidade futura. Os coeficientes das variaveis VR(-1) e LVR(-1), a um nivel de 5%, sao estatisticamente nao significantes, indicando que a volatilidade passada nao ajuda a prever a volatilidade futura. Esse resultado se mostra plausivel. Mesmo a volatilidade de hoje sendo fortemente influenciada pela de ontem, num mercado de alta variabilidade como o brasileiro, as volatilidades mensais nao se mostraram boas previsoras de volatilidade futura. Acrescentando as series de VI na Equacao 2, temos:

[VR.sub.t] = a + [[beta].sub.1][VI.sub.t] + [[beta].sub.2][VR.sub.t-1] + [[epsilon].sub.t] (3)

Na Tabela 5, que contem os resultados para a Equacao 3, observa-se que em nenhuma das equacoes a volatilidade passada possui algum tipo de informacao sobre a volatilidade futura, pois seu coeficiente e estatisticamente nulo em todas.

Por fim, convem verificar se lags (variaveis defasadas) da VI ajudam a explicar a volatilidade futura. Para tal foi estimada a seguinte regressao:

[VR.sub.t] = a + [beta][VI.sub.t-1] + [[epsilon]e.sub.t] (4)

Na Tabela 6 estao expostos os resultados da Equacao 4, onde vemos que o lag so contem poder explicativo sobre a volatilidade realizada quando utilizamos a serie de VI das opcoes OTM em nivel. Nos outros casos, a um nivel de significancia de 5%, os coeficientes sao estatisticamente nulos.

5. COMPARACAO COM TRABALHOS ANTERIORES

Os trabalhos anteriores possuem opinioes distintas sobre o conteudo informacional da volatilidade implicita em relacao a volatilidade futura. Day & Lewis (1992), que utilizaram opcoes sobre o indice S&P 100, e Lamoureux & Lastrapes (1993) que trabalharam com as 10 acoes mais liquidas do indice de acoes S&P 100, chegaram a resultados diferentes dos encontrados nesse estudo. Eles constataram que a volatilidade historica e melhor previsor da volatilidade futura do que a VI, a qual demonstrou ser muito viesada e ineficiente.

Canina & Figlewski (1993), utilizando como de opcoes sobre o indice S&P 100 antes de 1987, tambem chegaram a um resultado oposto ao encontrado neste trabalho: apenas a volatilidade historica possui informacoes sobre a volatilidade futura. No caso brasileiro, a volatilidade historica parece nao ter nenhum poder preditivo sobre a volatilidade futura quando se lida com dados mensais nao sobrepostos.

Mais recentemente, Christensen & Prabhala (1998) refizeram o estudo com opcoes sobre indice S&P 100, utilizando opcoes ATM com vencimentos mensais, sem sobreposicao dos dados e com uma base maior (139 observacoes). Os resultados apurados no periodo pos-crash da bolsa de Nova York foram muito parecidos com os encontrados na Equacao 1 em relacao ao estimador da VI das opcoes OTM. No nosso caso, a VI se mostrou um melhor previsor da volatilidade futura do que a volatilidade historica sendo, no entanto, mais viesada do que no estudo de CP. Outros pontos distintos foram observados em relacao a volatilidade historica e ao intercepto.

A volatilidade historica mostrou possuir poder preditivo no estudo de CP, enquanto o intercepto era estatisticamente nao significativo, culminando em resultados opostos ao deste trabalho. Nos tambem reiteramos as conclusoes do estudo de Gwilym & Buckle (1999), que assegura que a volatilidade implicita contem mais informacoes sobre a volatilidade realizada do que a volatilidade historica quando se utiliza opcoes de compra com um mes de maturidade. A grande diferenca entre nosso estudo e os dois citados acima e que as series de VI das opcoes que se mostraram com maior poder preditivo foram as OTM e nao as ATM, como nos trabalhos anteriores.

No Brasil, o estudo de Gabe & Portugal (2004) conclui que a volatilidade estimada atraves de diferentes modelos estatisticos da familia GARCH produz uma melhor previsao da volatilidade futura do que a implicita. Note, entretanto, que modelos GARCH especificam uma relacao regressiva diferente daquelas aqui estudadas.

Para que a comparacao entre VI e VH seja mais equilibrada e necessario que analise do conteudo informacional da volatilidade seja feita atraves de modelos identicos. Porem, os modelos GARCH, levam em conta nao so a volatilidade passada, mas tambem outras informacoes como os retornos passados. Mais ainda, a base de dados de Gabe & Portugal (2004) e menor que a nossa e contem dados sobrepostos. Os trabalhos possuem focos diferentes. Enquanto Gabe & Portugal (2004), se concentram em previsao (portanto, pouco importa um equilibrio na comparacao entre modelos), nos nos concentramos na analise do conteudo informacional.

6. CONCLUSAO

Neste estudo comparamos o poder explicativo da volatilidade implicita e historica em relacao a volatilidade futura usando dados do mercado de opcoes de Petrobras. A conclusao do estudo indica que o uso da volatilidade implicita das opcoes OTM mostrou possuir maior correlacao com a volatilidade futura do que a volatilidade historica.

O fraco poder explanatorio das opcoes ATM e ITM revela que ou o premio de risco de volatilidade dessas opcoes e alto ou o mercado apresenta ineficiencias. Nao foram encontradas evidencias, no periodo estudado (janeiro 2006 - dezembro 2008), de que a volatilidade historica possua qualquer correlacao com a volatilidade futura em termos mensais. Portanto, o emprego de uma abordagem foward looking, como e o caso das volatilidades implicitas das opcoes, parece ser uma alternativa a utilizacao de dados passados.

REFERENCIAS

BLACK, F.; SCHOLES, M. The Pricing of options and corporate liabilities. Journal of Political Economy, 1973.

BOX, G. P.; PIERCE, D. A. Distribution of residual autocorrelations in autoregressiveintegrated moving average time series models. Journal of the American Statistical Association, 65, p. 1509-1526, 1970.

CANINA, L.; FIGLEWSKI, S. The Informational content of implied volatility. Review of Financial Studies, v. 6, p. 659-681, 1993.

CHRISTENSEN, B. J.; PRABHALA, N. R. The Relation between implied and realized volatility. Journal of Financial Economics, v. 50, p. 125-150, 1998.

DAY, T.; LEWIS, C. Stock market volatility and the information content of stock index options. Journal of Econometrics, 52, 1992

DICKEY, D. A.; FULLER, W. A. Distribution of the estimators for autoregressive time series with a unit root. Journal of the American Statistical Association, 74, p. 427-431.

FRENCH, K.; SCHWERT, G.W.; STAMBAUGH, R. Expected stock returns and volatility. Journal of Financial Economics, 19, p. 3 - 30, 1987.

GABE, J.; PORTUGAL, M. S. Volatilidade implicita versus volatilidade estatistica: um exercicio utilizando opcoes e acoes da Telemar S.A. Revista Brasileira de Financas, v. 2, n. 1, p. 47-73, 2004.

GWILYM, O.A.; BUCKLE, M. Volatility forecasting in the framework of the option expiry circle. The European Journal of Finance, 5, 73-94, 1999.

HULL, John C. Options, futures and other derivatives. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall Inc., 1997.

LAMOUREUX, C. G.; LASTRAPES, W. Forecasting stock return variance: towards understanding stochastic implied volatility. Review of Financial Studies, 6. 1993.

TABAK, B. M; CHANG, E. J. Are implied volatilities more informative? The Brazilian real exchange rate case. Applied Financial Economics, 17, 569-576, 2006.

Recebido em 09/07/2009; revisado em 11/03/2010; aceito em 08/04/2010

Jose Valentim Machado Vicente ([dagger])

IBMEC-RJ

Tiago de Sousa Guedes ([OMEGA])

IBMEC-RJ

Correspondencia autores *:

([dagger]) Doutor em Economia Matematica pelo Instituto de Matematica Pura e Aplicada (IMPA). Professor das Faculdades Ibmec. Endereco: Av. Gastao Senges 55 ap. 803 Barra da Tijuca Rio de Janeiro-RJ. CEP: 22631-280. E-mail: jvalent@terra.com.br Telefone: (21) 2572-0692.

([OMEGA]) Mestre em Economia pelo IBMEC Endereco: Rua Gomes Carneiro, no.80, 302, Ipanema Rio de Janeiro/RJ 22071-110. E-mail: tguedes84@hotmail.com Telefone: (21) 9801-0654

Nota do Editor: Esse artigo foi aceito por Antonio Lopo Martinez

(i) Desta forma, os cuidados apontados por CP (nao sobreposicao amostral, opcoes com maturidade fixa) foram observados.

(ii) Neste estudo, tomamos como taxa sem risco a taxa CDI expressa em ano-base 252 dias uteis.

(iii) As opcoes sobre o indice S&P 100 usadas no estudo de CP sao tambem americanas, porem nao sao protegidas para dividendos. Isso introduz um vies no calculo da volatilidade implicita via o modelo de BS que nao ocorre no caso das opcoes de Petrobras. Portanto, correcoes nos erros nas variaveis das regressoes apresentadas na Secao 4 no artigo de CP nao sao necessarias neste trabalho.

(iv) Outros criterios mais usuais de moneyness, tais como aquele definido pelo Delta da opcao, exigiriam a construcao de uma superficie de volatilidade para selecao das opcoes ITM, ATM e OTM. Devido a pouca quantidade de series de opcoes disponiveis, o erro de interpolacao na superficie de volatilidade poderia comprometer os resultados.

(v) Os criterios de informacao sao definidos como: AIC = - 2(l/T) + 2(k/T) e BIC = -2(l/T) + klog(T)/T, onde l e o valor da funcao de verossimilhanca, k e o numero de parametros e T e o tamanho da amostra.

(vi) O valor de uma opcao pode ser dividido em valor intrinseco e valor extrinseco, ou seu valor no tempo. O valor intrinseco e a diferenca do preco a vista do ativo-objeto e o preco de exercicio da opcao de compra. O valor extrinseco reflete o custo de oportunidade e as expectativas do mercado.

(vii) A estatistica Durbin-Watson (DW) mensura a correlacao serial dos residuos. Um resultado proximo de dois indica que nao ha correlacao serial de primeira ordem.
Tabela 1--Estatisticas descritivas das series de volatilidade.

Estatisticas    VI ITM    VI ATM    VI OTM      VR

Media           1,1412    0,8035    0,6054    0,3251
Mediana         1,1583    0,7470    0,5435    0,3042
Maximo          1,6120    1,3681    1,2230    1,0844
Minimo          0,8090    0,5366    0,4032    0,1620
DP              0,2316    0,2100    0,2116    0,1167
Assimetria      0,2346    1,0516    1,6220    1,1874
Curtose         2,0580    3,5236    4,7752    4,2834

Estatisticas    LVI ITM    LVI ATM    LVI OTM      LVR

Media            0,1122    -0,2485    -0,5488    -1,1792
Mediana          0,1469    -0,2917    -0,6097    -1,1899
Maximo           0,4775     0,3135     0,2013    -0,4094
Minimo          -0,2120    -0,6225    -0,9084    -1,8204
DP               0,2044     0,2434     0,2965     0,3345
Assimetria      -0,0505     0,5728     1,1302     0,3169
Curtose          1,9218     2,6419     3,4345     2,8904

Nota: Esta tabela apresenta as principais estatisticas
descritivas das series de volatilidade. Abreviacoes: VI:
volatilidade implicita; ITM: in-the-money; ATM: at-the-
money; OTM: out-the-money; VR: volatilidade realizada; LVI:
log da volatilidade implicita; LVR: log da volatilidade
realizada; DP: desvio-padrao.

Fonte: Elaborado pelos autores

Tabela 2--ARIMA (p,d,q) para a volatilidade.

Modelo         [mu]     [[phi].sub.1]   [[phi].sub.1]

LVI ITM

ARMA(1,1)      -0,01    0,56#
AR(1)          -0,01    0,69#
AR(2)          -0,02    0,75#           -0,07
ARIMA(1,1,1)   -0,02    0,09#

LVI ATM

ARMA(1,1)      -0,22#   0,22
AR(1)          -0,10    0,64#
AR(2)          -0,11#   0,80#           -0,17
ARIMA(1,1,1)   -0,01    0,04

LVI OTM

ARMA(1,1)      -0,19    0,59#
AR(1)          -0,13    0,72#
AR(2)          -0,12    0,83#           -0,08
ARIMA(1,1,1)   0,00     -0,05

LVR

ARMA(1,1)      0,17#    1,12#
AR(1)          -0,27    0,72#
AR(2)          -0,11    0,56#           0,29
ARIMA(1,1,1)   0,02#    0,45#

Modelo         [[theta].sub.1]   [Q.sub.12]    AIC     BIC

LVI ITM

ARMA(1,1)      0,23              6,47         0,35    0,48
AR(1)                            6,26         0,30    0,39
AR(2)                            8,59         0,28    0,42
ARIMA(1,1,1)   -0,23             11,21        0,44    0,57

LVI ATM

ARMA(1,1)      0,70#             11,56        -0,04   0,10
AR(1)                            10,22        0,00    0,09
AR(2)                            11,31        -0,08   0,05
ARIMA(1,1,1)   -0,06             9,99         0,13    0,27

LVI OTM

ARMA(1,1)      0,25              12,47        -0,11   0,03
AR(1)                            12,13        -0,14   -0,05
AR(2)                            15,86        -0,20   -0,07
ARIMA(1,1,1)   0,02              17,73        -0,08   0,05

LVR

ARMA(1,1)      -1,00#            14,72        0,60    0,73
AR(1)                            13,87        0,79    0,88
AR(2)                            7,65         0,82    0,95
ARIMA(1,1,1)   -0,97#            12,29        0,67    0,81

Nota: Esta tabela apresenta os resultados dos ajustes pelo
modelo ARIMA para as series de logs das volatilidades (LVR,
LVI ITM, LVI ATM e LVI OTM). Valores em negrito indicam que
os parametros sao significantes no nivel de 95%. As colunas
AIC e BIC representam os criterios de informacao de Akaike e
Bayesiano, enquanto que [Q.sub.12] e a estatistica de Box e
Pierce (1970). Abreviacoes: ITM: in-the-money; ATM: at-the-money;
OTM: out-the-money; LVI: log da volatilidade
implicita; LVR: log da volatilidade realizada.

Fonte: Elaborado pelos autores

Tabela 3--Resultados da Equacao 1.

             Variavel    Coeficiente    Erro padrao    p-valor

Nivel ITM    C              0,2889         0,1220       0,0267
             VI_ITM         0,0317         0,1048       0,7650
Nivel ATM    C              0,1338         0,0868       0,1370
             VI_ATM         0,2380         0,1047       0,0327
Nivel OTM    C              0,1156         0,0573       0,0554
             VI_OTM         0,3460         0,0895       0,0008
Log ITM      C             -1,1779         0,0783       0,0000
             LVI_ITM       -0,0118         0,3412       0,9728
Log ATM      C             -1,0690         0,0934       0,0000
             LVI_ATM        0,4434         0,2713       0,1157
Log OTM      C             -0,8433         0,1227       0,0000
             LVI_OTM        0,6121         0,1976       0,0051

             Variavel    [R.sup.2]      DW
                          ajustado

Nivel ITM    C            -0,0393     1,2990
             VI_ITM
Nivel ATM    C             0,1479     1,8065
             VI_ATM
Nivel OTM    C             0,3674     2,1264
             VI_OTM
Log ITM      C            -0,0344     1,2515
             LVI_ITM
Log ATM      C             0,0651     1,6440
             LVI_ATM
Log OTM      C             0,2637     1,9768
             LVI_OTM

Nota:Esta tabela mostra os resultados da Equacao 1. Em
negrito estao os coeficientes estatisticamente
significativos. Abreviacoes: VI: volatilidade implicita;
ITM: in-the-money; ATM: at-the-money; OTM: out-the-money;
VR: volatilidade realizada; LVI: log da volatilidade
implicita; DW: Durbin-Watson.

Fonte: Elaborado pelos autores

Tabela 4--Resultados da Equacao 2.

                Variavel    Coeficiente     Erro     p-valor
                                           padrao

Nivel VR(-1)    C             -0,7669      0,2668     0,0088
                VR(-1)         0,3485      0,2147     0,1187
Log VR(-1)      C              0,2155      0,0733     0,0076
                LVR(-1)        0,3419      0,2199     0,1343

                Variavel     [R.sup.2]      DW
                             ajustado

Nivel VR(-1)    C             0,1070      2,0059
                VR(-1)
Log VR(-1)      C             0,0989      2,0337
                LVR(-1)

Nota: Esta tabela mostra os resultados da Equacao 2. Em
negrito estao os coeficientes estatisticamente
significativos. Abreviacoes: VR (-1): lag da volatilidade
realizada; LVR(-1): log do lag da volatilidade realizada DW:
Durbin-Watson.

Fonte: Elaborado pelos autores

Tabela 5--Resultados da Equacao 3.

             Variavel    Coeficiente     Erro     P-valor
                                        padrao

Nivel ITM    C              0,2227      0,1312     0,1043
             VI_ITM        -0,0076      0,1133     0,9471
             VR(-1)         0,3468      0,2366     0,1576
Nivel ATM    C              0,1064      0,0939     0,2696
             VI_ATM         0,2446      0,1400     0,0951
             VR(-1)         0,0569      0,2661     0,8328
Nivel OTM    C              0,1240      0,0634     0,0640
             VI_OTM         0,4488      0,1214     0,0013
             VR(-1)        -0,2402      0,2355     0,3193
Log ITM      C             -0,7036      0,3056     0,0317
             LVI_ITM       -0,1672      0,3690     0,6550
             LVR(-1)        0,3840      0,2322     0,1131
Log ATM      C             -0,8791      0,2844     0,0055
             LVI_ATM        0,3876      0,3520     0,2833
             LVR(-1)        0,1797      0,2629     0,5017
Log OTM      C             -0,9023      0,2383     0,0011
             LVI_OTM        0,7418      0,2661     0,0110
             LVR(-1)       -0,0938      0,2458     0,7065

             Variavel    [R.sup.2]      DW
                          ajustado

Nivel ITM    C             0,0991     2,0374
             VI_ITM
             VR(-1)
Nivel ATM    C             0,2134     1,9274
             VI_ATM
             VR(-1)
Nivel OTM    C             0,4543     1,7908
             VI_OTM
             VR(-1)
Log ITM      C             0,1156     2,0261
             LVI_ITM
             LVR(-1)
Log ATM      C             0,1557     1,9844
             LVI_ATM
             LVR(-1)
Log OTM      C             0,3481     1,9400
             LVI_OTM
             LVR(-1)

Nota: Esta tabela mostra os resultados da Equacao 3. Em
negrito estao os coeficientes estatisticamente
significativos. Abreviacoes: VI: volatilidade implicita;
ITM: in-the-money; ATM: at-the-money; OTM: out-the-money;
VR: volatilidade realizada; LVI: log da volatilidade
implicita VR(-1): lag da volatilidade realizada; LVR(-1):
log do lag da volatilidade realizada; DW: Durbin-Watson.

Fonte: Elaborado pelos autores

Tabela 6--Resultados da Equacao 4.

             Variavel       Coeficiente     Erro     P-valor
                                           padrao

Nivel ITM    C                 0,3984      0,1340     0,0070
             VI ITM(-1)       -0,0668      0,1174     0,5753
Nivel ATM    C                 0,1821      0,1098     0,1113
             VI_ATM(-1)        0,1812      0,1374     0,2006
Nivel OTM    C                 0,1472      0,0801     0,0797
             VI_OTM(-1)        0,3041      0,1327     0,0319
Log ITM      C                -1,1642      0,0790     0,0000
             LVI_ITM(-1)      -0,2275      0,3707     0,5457
Log ATM      C                -1,0929      0,1121     0,0000
             LVI_ATM(-1)       0,3434      0,3242     0,3010
Log OTM      C                -0,8796      0,1631     0,0000
             LVI_OTM(-1)       0,5287      0,2579     0,0525

             Variavel       [R.sup.2]      DW
                             ajustado

Nivel ITM    C                0,0144     1,2654
             VI ITM(-1)
Nivel ATM    C                0,0733     1,5753
             VI_ATM(-1)
Nivel OTM    C                0,1926     2,0419
             VI_OTM(-1)
Log ITM      C                0,0168     1,2713
             LVI_ITM(-1)
Log ATM      C                0,0485     1,4845
             LVI_ATM(-1)
Log OTM      C                0,1603     1,9268
             LVI_OTM(-1)

Nota: Esta tabela mostra os resultados da Equacao 4. Em
negrito estao os coeficientes estatisticamente
significativos. Abreviacoes: VI: volatilidade implicita;
ITM: in-the-money; ATM: at-the-money; OTM: out-the-money;
VR: volatilidade realizada; (-1): lag; LVI: log da
volatilidade implicita VR(-1): lag da volatilidade
realizada; LVR(-1): log do lag da volatilidade realizada;
DW: Durbin-Watson.

Fonte: Elaborado pelos autores
COPYRIGHT 2010 Fucape Business School/ Brazilian Business Review
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2010 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Author:Vicente, Jose Valentim Machado; de Sousa Guedes, Tiago
Publication:Brazilian Business Review
Date:Jan 1, 2010
Words:12569
Previous Article:Stock repurchases and fundamental analysis: an empirical study of the Brazilian market in the period from 1994 to 2006/A Recompra de acoes e a...
Next Article:Emprestimo consignado para aposentados e pensionistas do INSS: um estudo exploratorio com a utilizacao de principios de matematica atuarial.
Topics:

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2022 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters |