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Developing competencies of infection control for new graduates: a comparison between Australia and Taiwan.

Globalisation is not just an economic phenomenon. It has important implications across a range of other fields including health care.

The emergence of infectious diseases such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and their ability to easily cross national boundaries has focused increasing international attention on the control of such diseases.

Nurses hold a major responsibility for infection control as part of their daily health care activities with their patients. They play a major role in ensuring that appropriate practices are in place to meet the required standard of infection control.

It is self evident that nurses need to be well prepared and competent in infection control. Competency in infection control is a crucial component for the implementation of best practice for nurses in order to ensure patient safety as well as in providing high quality care. Little research has been undertaken to identify the essential infection control competencies that novice registered nurses require. In order to ensure that safe practice is provided in the care of patients, it is imperative to develop competencies of infection control during the pre-registration training of nurses.

Our study draws on the experiences of infection control experts and nurse educators in Australia and Taiwan. It aims to establish the essential competencies required for newly graduating nurses in both countries (and in other countries) by using a Delphi survey based on a consensus of expert opinion in Australia and Taiwan.

The results of this study are expected to make a contribution to the further development in international health care and the education for nursing graduates as well as other health care practitioners.

LESLEY LI-MEI LIU IS A PHD CANDIDATE AT THE SCHOOL OF NURSING, MIDWIFERY AND INDIGENOUS HEALTH AND LECTURER AT THE SCHOOL OF NURSING, CHANG GUNG INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY IN TAIWAN.

PROFESSOR PATRICK CROOKES IS THE DEAN OF THE FACULTY OF HEALTH & BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCES AND HEAD OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING, MIDWIFERY AND INDIGENOUS HEALTH.

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR JANETTE CURTIS AN INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM ADVISOR OF THE HEALTH & BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCES AND DIRECTOR MENTAL HEALTH NURSING ALL AUTHORS ARE BASED AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WOLLONGONG.
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Title Annotation:focus: Infection Control
Author:Liu, Lesley Li-Mei; Crookes, Patrick; Curtis, Janette
Publication:Australian Nursing Journal
Geographic Code:8AUST
Date:Jun 1, 2008
Words:353
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