Printer Friendly

Detox your mind; THE PARTY SEASON MAY BE IN FULL SWING, BUT BY FRIDAY YOU'LL PROBABLY HAVE MADE NUMEROUS RESOLUTIONS NEVER TO INDULGE AGAIN. SO HERE'S A 30- DAY DETOX YOUR MIND PROGRAMME TO HELP YOU START THE NEW YEAR THE WAY YOU MEAN TO GO ON.

It's not just your body that will be feeling sluggish after all that over-indulging at Christmas. Your mind is no doubt as fuzzy as your TV's reception in a storm. But there is a way to "spring-clean" your thoughts. The Detox Your Mind programme uses games, exercises, nutrition, and complementary therapies to boost your confidence, concentration and creativity. In Part One this week, we show you the rules, what you need, and the first 15 days' "workout". Designed to slot effortlessly into your everyday routine, the tasks will help you discover your own feel good factor and leave you feeling relaxed. In fact, you'll feel so good after the 30 days, you'll be ready to take on the world.

DO YOU NEED TO DETOX YOUR MIND?

If you answer "yes" to ANY of these questions, your mind is in urgent need of detoxing.

lDo you daydream to get away from it all?

lHave you forgotten to think about yourself?

lDo you think the cup is half empty, rather than half-full?

lDo you have worries and niggles constantly on your mind?

lDo your days come and go without much difference between them?

lIs there something you'd like to do but never seem to have time?

lWould you like to wake up looking forward to the day ahead?

lCould you do with a giggle?

lWould you like to change your world?

THE RULES

When detoxing your mind, you MUST...

1 Do the tasks in the order given.

2 Do all the tasks.

3 Start the tasks on a day so Day 8/9 fall on a weekend or when you have two days off.

4 Keep a diary.

5 Actively participate in each task, analysing at every stage how you are "feeling".

6 Enlist a friend or colleague to do the programme with.

7 Read the Brain Food section (on Page 23) before you start.

8 NOT peep at the tasks too far in advance. The surprise element adds to the effectiveness.

SHOPPING LIST

You will need the following things prior to starting.

lNotebook, pen and diary. You should read all the diary entries every time you make a new one. Use it as a detailed account of how you feel or think every day. Do not describe your day, but how you are feeling in relation to any the tasks you have completed.

lLocal newspapers.

lA phone directory.

lLocal bus and train timetables.

lAn appliance that you don't get on with. Something you use on a frequent basis, but which has a number of functions which are a mystery to you - a video recorder, for example.

lRelaxation music, specially bought, or from your own collection - preferably without lyrics.

lAromatherapy oils, use some good quality essential oils.

DAY 1

Today, you will smile at everything that deserves a smile. Smiling is positive. It gets any conversation or encounter off to a positive start. Smile, and an everyday task can become a joy. Thoughts are uplifted and problems seem easier to deal with. Children smile an average of 400 times a day, whilst adults only manage a grin 15 times a day. Smiling needs to be genuine.

A real smile will light up your face, crinkle your eyes and wrinkle your nose, it will show your teeth and lift your cheeks; and it will make you feel great. Try saying something nice about the person in your head as you smile and this will ensure the smile is real. Write down how you felt about smiling all day.

DAY 2

If you're not happy, then it is hard to generate happiness for others. Grab at least 20 minutes of "me" time and watch your thoughts relax with you. This is something that we are not usually encouraged to do. It is frowned upon and considered self-centered. Start to include time every day during which you do something for yourself. It can be frivolous, or serious, but it must be entirely for you. It is chilling-out time. A time to gather your thoughts, to concentrate on yourself and your feelings. It is important that you do this every day. If you put it off, or try to take 2 hours every 4 days, then your "me" time will disappear. You could have a cup of tea and a biscuit; apply a face pack; visit a golfer's driving range; read a magazine; watch a programme you recorded; go for a walk; balance your cheque book or stroll around the garden.

DAY 3

Today you will draw a picture and write a poem about what's going on in your head to get your thoughts to come alive.

Your picture should use colours and shapes to communicate your innermost thoughts. Think about children's drawings - they use yellow to signify warmth and brightness and black for what is scary and bad. Your drawing should be private. It may develop into a series of drawings in your diary, or notebook, or on bigger sheets of paper. The other part of the task involves poetry. Keep the words simple. When you write about feeling happy or angry, use those words. Don't feel you have to be a literary genius. Your poems do not need to rhyme. Just get your thoughts down on paper at random. As with the drawings, you should keep a few of your poems and read them to yourself over a period of time. Read "good" poems when you feel bad, to remind you that you can feel better. Keep returning to the drawings and poems throughout the programme, if you find them helpful. You may only want to do one or two today; don't force the issue.

DAY 4

Nothing concentrates the mind like a small dose of abject terror! You can find out so much about yourself - how you feel and how you react. Doing an activity that you consider beyond you is a challenge that will boost your self-esteem and exercise your grey matter. Perceived risks can be taken by going to a place where there are professionals equipped to take you through an unusual experience while observing the safety rules. They will assess whether you are able to carry out the task without putting yourself in danger. The risk will all be in your head. You could do an assisted parachute jump; a bungee jump; go white-water rafting, rock climbing, or go-kart racing; take a balloon trip or a glider flight; hold a snake or a tarantula; make a public speech; or appear in a play. It doesn't have to put you in physical danger, but it does have to be something you find daunting. Work out your biggest challenge and, when you feel ready, make the arrangements. Use today to think about this and one of the "floating days" to carry out the task. Good luck!

DAY 5

Choose an appliance that baffles you - the video recorder, the oven timer, the memory on your telephone, the diary on your computer, checking the oil and water in your car. Now choose the function that you have always ignored and teach yourself how to do it. If at first you don't succeed, just breathe deeply and try again. Make sure you have all the relevant parts - if a vital piece is missing or broken, you will find it impossible to get results. And make sure you are solving a problem that you want to solve - there is little satisfaction if you never use the video. If you are one of the few who love to take apart your CD player and put it back together, spend your time going through the list of "perceived risks" from Day 4 and finalising your choice.

DAY 6

Use today to plan Day 4's Perceived Risk Taking in greater depth, or read your diary and assess the progress you have made. Are the clouds lifting from your mind? Are you discovering new interests and enthusiasms? Are you more receptive to ideas? Have you learnt anything new? Are you beginning to feel sharper? More sure of what you want? More confident? More positive?

DAY 7

Today you must get to know yourself. Every day you carry out tasks and jobs without question. Every day we do things that, if we took time to listen to our response, we would not do - or would do differently. Listening to yourself involves being honest about what you really want. One way of "listening" is to write yourself a letter that allows your "self" to say how you are really feeling, what's causing you concern and what is good about your life - anything that is currently in your head. You will need a quiet, warm room for an hour or so, a notebook and pen. Take your pen and write a letter to your self. Be very honest. Don't try and analyse or censor how you are feeling, just tell it like it is, now, today. No one but you will ever see this letter. When it is finished, sit back, breathe deeply and read it to yourself, slowly. It deserves a response; you have put a lot of emotion into your letter. So write back and say how you feel.

DAYS 8 AND 9

For the next two days you will detox your mind of all the short-cuts to happiness. Give some thought as to how to spend your time without spending your money. Your local papers, bus and train timetables, plus your local library, shop windows, council offices, community and sports centres will be helpful. The following things are out of bounds as they are either expensive or do not encourage you to use your imagination or brain power: Renting a video; going to the cinema; theatre; zoo; shopping; going out for dinner; to the pub; or for a drive. The following cost nothing and are permitted: Using store cupboard ingredients to make a cake or to cook a meal for friends; weeding the garden; exploring your local area; decorating a room; tidying a cupboard; reading about a new topic at your local library. Try to do only minimal preparation, to make your two days more spontaneous. Encourage your friends to join your challenge.

DAY 10

Today you will find out how other people see you and how it compares to how you see yourself. If you give out a positive "vibe", then your thoughts are on their way to getting thoroughly detoxed; if you give out a negative "vibe", then some more work on clearing out your negative thoughts is required. If it turns out that people see you in a negative light, don't despair - you have recognised the fact, and now you can work on rectifying your image. Select three or four friends who are prepared to be honest. Ask people who know you well. Simply asking them what they think of you will never give you the results you want. So use the questions below. Ask yourself the questions first. Ask your friends the questions without any prior warning and don't discuss their original answers. Take a look at what they have said, compare it with what you have written, and then decide if it is an accurate image of the real you.

Q: If I was a car, what make of car would I be? (Let them answer and then use the answer to ask the next question.) A: Mini Metro.

Q: What type of person is a Mini Metro-type of person?

Q: If I was a country, what country would I be? A: Italy.

Q: What type of person is an Italy-type of person?

Q: If I was a season, what season would I be? A: Summer.

Q What type of person is a summer-type of person?

DAY 11

Today you are going to create some space in your head. Eliminate the negative and allow the positive in. It will not be an easy day - but it is worth the pain and effort. We all have ghosts and skeletons in our minds. People who have done us wrong, people who helped us but we never showed our gratitude, or people who died without us telling them we loved them. Often, it takes more courage or emotion than we are comfortable using to rectify a situation. Sometimes it is too late to change a situation. But we still dwell on what might have been. Note down all the situations, with their attendant emotions. Take them one at a time and write a letter to them. Discuss every issue that concerns you and describe how you feel then and now. Read your letter, put it in an envelope and seal it. Address it to the person or situation it concerns - even if they are dead. Put your letters in a safe place, under lock and key, or destroy them. Rest happy that the negativity they produced has been cleared from your mind.

DAY 12

Inject some creativity into your life! When was the last time you changed your routine, either socially or at work? Every day we spend about 15 hours awake, yet every day we do the same thing. If you changed your routine, your mind would act positively rather than operating on autopilot. Choose a normal day and turn it upside down:

lSet the alarm earlier, or later. Get out of the other side of the bed.

lHave your shower/bath before breakfast, or after breakfast, whichever is not the norm.

lGet dressed in a completely different outfit to normal. If you wear make-up, don't. If you don't wear scent, put some on.

lGet the bus instead of the car, or take the car instead of the train. Use a carrier bag and not a briefcase.

lIf you normally buy a sandwich, take a packed lunch.

lLeave later than normal, or earlier. Catch a different train home. Cook something completely new to you.

DAY 13

Do something you have never done before and see how you like it and what you learn. There are many things that we don't try, either because we are scared, because we consider them unsuitable, or because we are stuck in a rut. Today you must arrange, book or actually do FIVE things that you have never experienced - there are floating days on which you can do some of these activities. You could go to a play; watch a rugby match; eat frog's legs; eat shark steaks; go to an aquarium; go to a safari park; make a cake; cook an exotic meal; read a play; go for a jog. Think about how your "new" things made you feel.

DAY 14

Book a treatment of your choice, anything so long as it will clear your mind and help you relax both physically and mentally. Here are some of the more mentally stimulating treatments that you could try to lift your mind and energise your spirits. lAcupuncture lAromatherapy lBach flower remedies lColonic irrigation lIndian head massage, lFloatation lLight therapy lYoga.

DAY 15

Today you must pay a compliment to a friend and a stranger. As with the smiling, this will only work if the compliment is genuine. You will need to be very observant and give careful thought to everyone you see or speak to on the telephone. Focus on positive things about them. Try to think about one good thing to say about everyone. You will find that this lifts your spirits and makes the world a much nicer place.

lAdapted from Detox Your Mind by Jane Scrivner, published by Piatkus Books, paperback pounds 6.99. To order a copy please call 01476 541 080.

THE FOOD RULES

1. Eat five or six regular, small meals. It will keep you more mentally alert than two or three big meals. Equal portions for breakfast, lunch and the evening meal will help keep your brain working efficiently.

2. Don't skip breakfast. If you have breakfast then you will satisfy any needs.

3. Eat a mid-morning snack. This will stave off any hunger pangs and keep energy at a constant level.

4. Eat lunch as normal. Make it light and refreshing include lots of fresh, raw vegetables.

5. Eat a mid-afternoon snack to prevent the "snooze" syndrome.

6. Supper in the evening should not necessarily be the largest meal of the day.

7. If your day starts at 8am then you should be thinking about taking your meals as follows: 8.30am breakfast; 11.30am mid-morning snack; 1.30pm lunch; 3.00pm mid-afternoon snack; 6.30pm supper; 9.30pm Light snack. Make sure the timings are split equally so that your body is not left without food for long periods of time.

8. Try to keep your diet as natural as possible and try to cook the foods as little as possible. Vegetables should be raw, lightly stir-fried or quickly grilled to keep all the nutrients in them.

It's not just your body that will be feeling sluggish after all that over-indulging at Christmas. Your mind is no doubt as fuzzy as your TV's reception in a storm. But there is a way to "spring-clean" your thoughts. The Detox Your Mind programme uses games, exercises, nutrition, and complementary therapies to boost your confidence, concentration and creativity. In Part One this week, we show you the rules, what you need, and the first 15 days' "workout". Designed to slot effortlessly into your everyday routine, the tasks will help you discover your own feel good factor and leave you feeling relaxed. In fact, you'll feel so good after the 30 days, you'll be ready to take on the world.

DO YOU NEED TO DETOX YOUR MIND?

If you answer "yes" to ANY of these questions, your mind is in urgent need of detoxing.

lDo you daydream to get away from it all?

lHave you forgotten to think about yourself?

lDo you think the cup is half empty, rather than half-full?

lDo you have worries and niggles constantly on your mind?

lDo your days come and go without much difference between them?

lIs there something you'd like to do but never seem to have time?

lWould you like to wake up looking forward to the day ahead?

lCould you do with a giggle?

lWould you like to change your world?

THE RULES

When detoxing your mind, you MUST...

1 Do the tasks in the order given.

2 Do all the tasks.

3 Start the tasks on a day so Day 8/9 fall on a weekend or when you have two days off.

4 Keep a diary.

5 Actively participate in each task, analysing at every stage how you are "feeling".

6 Enlist a friend or colleague to do the programme with.

7 Read the Brain Food section (on Page 23) before you start.

8 NOT peep at the tasks too far in advance. The surprise element adds to the effectiveness.

SHOPPING LIST

You will need the following things prior to starting.

lNotebook, pen and diary. You should read all the diary entries every time you make a new one. Use it as a detailed account of how you feel or think every day. Do not describe your day, but how you are feeling in relation to any the tasks you have completed.

lLocal newspapers.

lA phone directory.

lLocal bus and train timetables.

lAn appliance that you don't get on with. Something you use on a frequent basis, but which has a number of functions which are a mystery to you - a video recorder, for example.

lRelaxation music, specially bought, or from your own collection - preferably without lyrics.

lAromatherapy oils, use some good quality essential oils.

DAY 1

Today, you will smile at everything that deserves a smile. Smiling is positive. It gets any conversation or encounter off to a positive start. Smile, and an everyday task can become a joy. Thoughts are uplifted and problems seem easier to deal with. Children smile an average of 400 times a day, whilst adults only manage a grin 15 times a day. Smiling needs to be genuine.

A real smile will light up your face, crinkle your eyes and wrinkle your nose, it will show your teeth and lift your cheeks; and it will make you feel great. Try saying something nice about the person in your head as you smile and this will ensure the smile is real. Write down how you felt about smiling all day.

DAY 2

If you're not happy, then it is hard to generate happiness for others. Grab at least 20 minutes of "me" time and watch your thoughts relax with you. This is something that we are not usually encouraged to do. It is frowned upon and considered self-centered. Start to include time every day during which you do something for yourself. It can be frivolous, or serious, but it must be entirely for you. It is chilling-out time. A time to gather your thoughts, to concentrate on yourself and your feelings. It is important that you do this every day. If you put it off, or try to take 2 hours every 4 days, then your "me" time will disappear. You could have a cup of tea and a biscuit; apply a face pack; visit a golfer's driving range; read a magazine; watch a programme you recorded; go for a walk; balance your cheque book or stroll around the garden.

DAY 3

Today you will draw a picture and write a poem about what's going on in your head to get your thoughts to come alive.

Your picture should use colours and shapes to communicate your innermost thoughts. Think about children's drawings - they use yellow to signify warmth and brightness and black for what is scary and bad. Your drawing should be private. It may develop into a series of drawings in your diary, or notebook, or on bigger sheets of paper. The other part of the task involves poetry. Keep the words simple. When you write about feeling happy or angry, use those words. Don't feel you have to be a literary genius. Your poems do not need to rhyme. Just get your thoughts down on paper at random. As with the drawings, you should keep a few of your poems and read them to yourself over a period of time. Read "good" poems when you feel bad, to remind you that you can feel better. Keep returning to the drawings and poems throughout the programme, if you find them helpful. You may only want to do one or two today; don't force the issue.

DAY 4

Nothing concentrates the mind like a small dose of abject terror! You can find out so much about yourself - how you feel and how you react. Doing an activity that you consider beyond you is a challenge that will boost your self-esteem and exercise your grey matter. Perceived risks can be taken by going to a place where there are professionals equipped to take you through an unusual experience while observing the safety rules. They will assess whether you are able to carry out the task without putting yourself in danger. The risk will all be in your head. You could do an assisted parachute jump; a bungee jump; go white-water rafting, rock climbing, or go-kart racing; take a balloon trip or a glider flight; hold a snake or a tarantula; make a public speech; or appear in a play. It doesn't have to put you in physical danger, but it does have to be something you find daunting. Work out your biggest challenge and, when you feel ready, make the arrangements. Use today to think about this and one of the "floating days" to carry out the task. Good luck!

DAY 5

Choose an appliance that baffles you - the video recorder, the oven timer, the memory on your telephone, the diary on your computer, checking the oil and water in your car. Now choose the function that you have always ignored and teach yourself how to do it. If at first you don't succeed, just breathe deeply and try again. Make sure you have all the relevant parts - if a vital piece is missing or broken, you will find it impossible to get results. And make sure you are solving a problem that you want to solve - there is little satisfaction if you never use the video. If you are one of the few who love to take apart your CD player and put it back together, spend your time going through the list of "perceived risks" from Day 4 and finalising your choice.

DAY 6

Use today to plan Day 4's Perceived Risk Taking in greater depth, or read your diary and assess the progress you have made. Are the clouds lifting from your mind? Are you discovering new interests and enthusiasms? Are you more receptive to ideas? Have you learnt anything new? Are you beginning to feel sharper? More sure of what you want? More confident? More positive?

DAY 7

Today you must get to know yourself. Every day you carry out tasks and jobs without question. Every day we do things that, if we took time to listen to our response, we would not do - or would do differently. Listening to yourself involves being honest about what you really want. One way of "listening" is to write yourself a letter that allows your "self" to say how you are really feeling, what's causing you concern and what is good about your life - anything that is currently in your head. You will need a quiet, warm room for an hour or so, a notebook and pen. Take your pen and write a letter to your self. Be very honest. Don't try and analyse or censor how you are feeling, just tell it like it is, now, today. No one but you will ever see this letter. When it is finished, sit back, breathe deeply and read it to yourself, slowly. It deserves a response; you have put a lot of emotion into your letter. So write back and say how you feel.

DAYS 8 AND 9

For the next two days you will detox your mind of all the short-cuts to happiness. Give some thought as to how to spend your time without spending your money. Your local papers, bus and train timetables, plus your local library, shop windows, council offices, community and sports centres will be helpful. The following things are out of bounds as they are either expensive or do not encourage you to use your imagination or brain power: Renting a video; going to the cinema; theatre; zoo; shopping; going out for dinner; to the pub; or for a drive. The following cost nothing and are permitted: Using store cupboard ingredients to make a cake or to cook a meal for friends; weeding the garden; exploring your local area; decorating a room; tidying a cupboard; reading about a new topic at your local library. Try to do only minimal preparation, to make your two days more spontaneous. Encourage your friends to join your challenge.

DAY 10

Today you will find out how other people see you and how it compares to how you see yourself. If you give out a positive "vibe", then your thoughts are on their way to getting thoroughly detoxed; if you give out a negative "vibe", then some more work on clearing out your negative thoughts is required. If it turns out that people see you in a negative light, don't despair - you have recognised the fact, and now you can work on rectifying your image. Select three or four friends who are prepared to be honest. Ask people who know you well. Simply asking them what they think of you will never give you the results you want. So use the questions below. Ask yourself the questions first. Ask your friends the questions without any prior warning and don't discuss their original answers. Take a look at what they have said, compare it with what you have written, and then decide if it is an accurate image of the real you.

Q: If I was a car, what make of car would I be? (Let them answer and then use the answer to ask the next question.) A: Mini Metro.

Q: What type of person is a Mini Metro-type of person?

Q: If I was a country, what country would I be? A: Italy.

Q: What type of person is an Italy-type of person?

Q: If I was a season, what season would I be? A: Summer.

Q What type of person is a summer-type of person?

DAY 11

Today you are going to create some space in your head. Eliminate the negative and allow the positive in. It will not be an easy day - but it is worth the pain and effort. We all have ghosts and skeletons in our minds. People who have done us wrong, people who helped us but we never showed our gratitude, or people who died without us telling them we loved them. Often, it takes more courage or emotion than we are comfortable using to rectify a situation. Sometimes it is too late to change a situation. But we still dwell on what might have been. Note down all the situations, with their attendant emotions. Take them one at a time and write a letter to them. Discuss every issue that concerns you and describe how you feel then and now. Read your letter, put it in an envelope and seal it. Address it to the person or situation it concerns - even if they are dead. Put your letters in a safe place, under lock and key, or destroy them. Rest happy that the negativity they produced has been cleared from your mind.

DAY 12

Inject some creativity into your life! When was the last time you changed your routine, either socially or at work? Every day we spend about 15 hours awake, yet every day we do the same thing. If you changed your routine, your mind would act positively rather than operating on autopilot. Choose a normal day and turn it upside down:

lSet the alarm earlier, or later. Get out of the other side of the bed.

lHave your shower/bath before breakfast, or after breakfast, whichever is not the norm.

lGet dressed in a completely different outfit to normal. If you wear make-up, don't. If you don't wear scent, put some on.

lGet the bus instead of the car, or take the car instead of the train. Use a carrier bag and not a briefcase.

lIf you normally buy a sandwich, take a packed lunch.

lLeave later than normal, or earlier. Catch a different train home. Cook something completely new to you.

DAY 13

Do something you have never done before and see how you like it and what you learn. There are many things that we don't try, either because we are scared, because we consider them unsuitable, or because we are stuck in a rut. Today you must arrange, book or actually do FIVE things that you have never experienced - there are floating days on which you can do some of these activities. You could go to a play; watch a rugby match; eat frog's legs; eat shark steaks; go to an aquarium; go to a safari park; make a cake; cook an exotic meal; read a play; go for a jog. Think about how your "new" things made you feel.

DAY 14

Book a treatment of your choice, anything so long as it will clear your mind and help you relax both physically and mentally. Here are some of the more mentally stimulating treatments that you could try to lift your mind and energise your spirits. lAcupuncture lAromatherapy lBach flower remedies lColonic irrigation lIndian head massage, lFloatation lLight therapy lYoga.

DAY 15

Today you must pay a compliment to a friend and a stranger. As with the smiling, this will only work if the compliment is genuine. You will need to be very observant and give careful thought to everyone you see or speak to on the telephone. Focus on positive things about them. Try to think about one good thing to say about everyone. You will find that this lifts your spirits and makes the world a much nicer place.

lAdapted from Detox Your Mind by Jane Scrivner, published by Piatkus Books, paperback pounds 6.99. To order a copy please call 01476 541 080.

BRAIN FOOD

Following a balanced diet provides the necessary nutrients to keep the mind alert and fit for the Detox Your Mind programme.

Fruit and vegetables should form one-third of your daily intake and starchy carbohydrates another third. The remaining third should be meat/fish/protein with very small amounts of dairy and sugary/ high-fat-content carbohydrates.

Some foods have a nourishing effect on the brain.

Choline: Boosts memory (vegetables, egg yolks).

DMAE (dimethy-laminoethanol): Elevates mood, improves memory and increases intelligence (fish, especially anchovies and sardines).

Inositol: Nourishes brain cells (grapefruit, cabbage).

Niacin: Healthy nervous system and brain function. (liver, kidney, fish, eggs, poultry, avocado, peaches).

Sulphur: Oxygen balance for brain function (fish, eggs, cabbage).

Zinc: Brain function and mental alertness (wheatgerm, pumpkin seeds, eggs, ground mustard).

Tryptophan: Essential amino acids for brain to produce serotonin (milk, fish, turkey, bananas, dried dates, peanuts).

Phenalalanine: Improves memory and alertness (protein-rich foods, soy, almonds, pumpkins, sesame seeds).

Carbohydrates: Provide essential energy for brain and nervous system (bread, pasta, pulses, rice, oats, potatoes, sweet potatoes).

Iodine: Improves readiness and pace of brain (kelp, onions, sea-food).

Reduce or eliminate these: caffeine, alcohol, cakes, biscuits, crisps, sweets, chocolate, meat and dairy fats, smoking. They can inhibit absorption or release of essential substances.

NEXT WEEK: PART TWO SWEET SMELL OF SUCCESS
COPYRIGHT 1998 MGN LTD
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1998 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:Features
Publication:Sunday Mirror (London, England)
Date:Dec 27, 1998
Words:5612
Previous Article:It's goodbye from him: Another Christmas turkey - stuff it!; COLIN WILLS PICKS OVER THE LEFT-OVERS OF A NOT-SO-MERRY HOLIDAY AND WISHES YOU ALL A...
Next Article:Party time: Can a single pill realy cure a hangover?

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2021 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters |