Printer Friendly

Depredacion de Caracara cheriway sobre las aves acuaticas migratorias, Egretta thula y Podiceps nigricollis, en el Sur de la Peninsula de Baja California.

CARACARA CHERIWAY PREDATION ON MIGRATORY WATERBIRDS, EGRETTA THULA AND PODICEPS NIGRICOLLIS, IN SOUTHERN BAJA CALIFORNIA PENINSULA

The crested caracara Caracara cheriway (Falconidae) is a medium-sized raptor (1050-1300 g), with a range from the southernmost United States, central and southern Florida, southern Texas, southern Arizona, Baja California Peninsula through Mexico and Central and South America (Morrison & Dwyer 2012). The crested caracara is a very common raptor throughout the Baja California Peninsula, but far more abundant south of 28[degrees]N (Wilbur 1987, Rodriguez-Estrella et al. unpubl. data). In spite of its wide range, little is known of its feeding habits. This caracara was previously considered a primary carrion feeder (Bailey 1925, Bent 1938). It is now considered a generalist and opportunistic forager, taking a wide variety of live vertebrate and invertebrate prey, as well as carrion, from a variety of habitats, but primarily open habitats (Rodriguez-Estrella & Rivera 1997, Travaini et al. 2001, Martinelly 2010, Morrison & Dwyer 2012). In this note, we present two observations of the crested Caracara preying on the snowy egret and eared grebe during winter in the southern part of the Baja California Peninsula.

The snowy egret Egretta thula (Pelecaniformes, Fam. Ardeidae) and the eared grebe Podiceps nigricollis (Podicipediformes, Fam. Podicipedidae) are two migratory waterbirds entering the Baja California Peninsula. E. thula overwinters throughout Mexico and Central America southward to Panama (Ridgely & Gwynne 1989, Stiles & Skutch 1989, Howell & Webb 1995). This species nests in the Baja California Peninsula at Laguna Ojo de Liebre, San Ignacio, and Isla San Jose (Wilbur 1987). P. nigricollis has a winter range that is fairly restricted. Both species migrate to the Peninsula to overwinter. The vast majority of the eared grebe, hundreds of thousands of birds, overwinters on islands in the north and central Gulf of California (Cullen et al. 1999); several thousand spend the winter on salt flats at Guerrero Negro in the State of Baja California Sur (Carmona & Danemann 1998).

Both waterbird species feed on a wide variety of aquatic prey. Eared grebe (ca. 500 g) prey mainly on invertebrates, including small crustaceans (Cullen et al. 1999) and snowy egret (370 g; Palmer 1962) prey upon earthworms and annelid worms, aquatic and terrestrial insects and crabs, marine fish, and even frogs, snakes, and lizards (Kushlan 1978a, 1978b, Parsons & Master 2000). However, there is no information on predators of either species and certainly nothing on predation in their wintering grounds (Cullen et al. 1999, Parsons & Master 2000). In this note, we present two observations of the crested Caracara preying on the snowy egret and eared grebe during winter in the southern part of the Baja California Peninsula.

On January 4, 2015 between 11:35 to 12:00 H we observed an aggregation of migratory waterbirds feeding near the shore at a beach named CIBNOR El Comitan (24[degrees]08'12.3"N, 110[degrees]25'31.50"W), 15 km North of La Paz city. This beach is shallow frequently having an accumulation of algae near the coast, where abundant invertebrates and small fishes feed on and rest. Thus, migratory and resident waterbirds usually are observed feeding over there. We observed during high tide eared grebes (juveniles, adults), snowy egrets (juveniles), brant goose (Branta bernicla, adults), marbled godwit (Limosa fedoa, adults) and snowy plovers (Charadrius alexandrines, adults) foraging in the wetland. No carcass of any waterbird was observed in the area at the beginning of observations at 11:44. At 15:53 with low tide we observed that eared grebes and snowy egrets were not longer in the area, they flew away, and two individuals of crested caracara, a juvenile and an adult, were feeding on recently killed snowy egret juvenile and eared grebe adult, respectively (Fig. 1a, b). We suggest caracaras killed these waterbirds. When the caracara adult became aware of our presence (at 15:59), it took and carried the grebe with its beak (Fig. 1c); suddenly, the caracara drop the rest of the carcass and flew directly where the juvenile was feeding on the snowy egret (approximate distance, 32 meters). At 16:00 both the adult and juvenile continued feeding on the remains of the egret body (Fig. 1d). At 16:03 the juvenile flew away from the site and the adult caracara continued feeding on until 16:09, when it left the area.

The crested caracara is a carrion eater and frequently performs kleptoparasitim and hunts live prey, mostly small items (Glazener 1964, Yosef & Yosef 1992, Rodriguez-Estrella & Rivera 1992, 1997). Crested caracaras may prey on live small birds, lizards, snakes, rabbits (Sylvilagus spp.) and rodents (Bent 1938, Whitacre etal. 1982, Rodriguez-Estrella & Rivera 1997, Travaini et al. 2001). There are only few reports of crested caracara hunting waterbirds white ibis (Eudocimus albus; weight 750-1050 g; Bent 1938), cattle egrets (Bubulcus ibis; weight 270512 g; Layne et al. 1977, Whitacre et al. 1982) a prey-size bigger than its common medium prey size (Rodriguez-Estrella & Rivera 1997) but likely within the range of birds that can be preyed upon by caracaras. None report existed about predation on waterbirds in wintering grounds and it is certainly important to determine the potential causes of death for wintering birds. Of special relevance in our report is that apparent predation was observed on two different waterbird species at the same time in the same area by one adult and one juvenil crested caracara. It has been noted that pairs of caracara adults can coordinate attacks on cattle egrets (Whitacre et al. 1982) and white ibis (Barbour 1923). However, adults can teach juveniles to hunt preys and lead juveniles to predictable food sources (Ro driguez-Estrella & Rivera 1997). We do not know if the successful capture of two waterbird species in our study area could be the result of coordinated hunting, but a concentration of migratory birds might increase their risk of predation. Our observations increase the knowledge of the predatory life history of crested caracara on live prey, particularly in coastal wintering grounds.

[FIGURE 1 OMITTED]

Acknowledgements. We appreciate the comments of three anonymous reviewers that improved a first draft. Ira Fogel of CIBNOR provided editorial services. Funding was provided by SEP-CONAYT (155956) and CIBNOR grants.

LITERATURE CITED

Barbour, T. 1923. The birds of Cuba. Memoirs of the Nuttall Ornithological Club, no. 6, Cambridge, MA, 141 pp.

Bailey, H. H. 1925. The birds of Florida. Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore, MD, 146 pp.

Bent, A. C. 1938. Life histories of North American birds of prey (Part 2). U.S. Natural Museum Bulletin, 170 pp.

Carmona, R. & Danemann, G. D. 1998. Distribucion espacio temporal de aves en la salina de Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Ciencias Marinas, 24: 389-408.

Cullen, S. A., Jehl, Jr. J. R. & Nuechterlein, G. L. 1999. Eared grebe (Podiceps nigricollis). In: A. Poole (Ed.), The Birds of North America Online. Ithaca, NY: Cornell Lab of Ornithology; Retrieved 26 August 2015 from the Birds of North America Online: http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/bna/species/433.

Glazener, W.C. 1964. Note on the feeding habits of the caracara in South Texas. Condor, 66: 162-163.

Howell, S. N. G. & Webb, S. 1995. A guide to the birds of Mexico and northern Central America. New York: Oxford University Press, 868 pp.

Kushlan, J. A. 1978a. Feeding ecology of wading birds. In: A. Sprunt IV, J. C. Ogden and S. Winckler (Eds.), Wading birds (pp. 249-297). National Audubon Society Research: New York.

Kushlan, J. A. 1978b. Nonrigorous foraging by robbing egrets. Ecology, 59: 649-653.

Layne, J. N., Loher, F. E. & Winegarner, C. E. 1977. Bird and mammal predators on the cattle egret in Florida. Field Naturalist, 5: l-4.

Martinelli, M. M. 2010. Record of opportunist predation of marine catfish Genidens genidens Valenciennes, 1839 (Siluriformes, Ariidae) by the crested-caracara Caracara plancus Miller, 1777 (Falconiformes, Falconidae) in estuary of Jucu River, Espirito Santo, Brazil. Pan-American Journal of Aquatic Sciences, 5: 162-165.

Morrison, J. L. & Dwyer, J. F. 2012. Crested caracara (Caracara cheriway). In: A. Poole (Ed.), The Birds of North America Online. Ithaca, NY: Cornell Lab of Ornithology; Retrieved 26 August 2015 from the Birds of North America Online: http://bna.birds. cornell.edu.bnaproxy.birds.cornell.edu/bna/species/249.

Palmer, R. G. 1962. Handbook of North American birds, Vol. 1: Loons through flamingos. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 567 pp.

Parsons, K. C. & Master, T. L. 2000. Snowy egret (Egretta thula). In: A. Poole (Ed.), The Birds of North America Online. Ithaca, NY: Cornell Lab of Ornithology; Retrieved 26 August 2015 from the Birds of North America Online: http://bna.birds.cornell.edu. bnaproxy.birds.cornell.edu/bna/species/489.

Ridgely, R. S. & Gwynne, J. A. Jr. 1989. A guide to the birds of Panama. 2nd ed. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 519 pp.

Rodriguez-Estrella, R. & Rivera, L. B. R. 1992. Kleptoparasitism and other interactions of crested caracara in the Cape Region, Baja California, Mexico. Journal of Field Ornithology, 63: 177-180.

Rodriguez-Estrella, R. & Rivera, L. B. R. 1997. Crested caracara food habits in the Cape region of Baja California, Mexico. Journal of Raptor Research, 31: 228-233.

Travaini, A., Donazar, J. A., Ceballos, O. & Hiraldo, F. 2001. Food habits of the crested caracara (Caracara plancus) in the Andean Patagonia: the role of breeding constraints. Journal of Arid Environments, 48: 211-219.

Stiles, F. G. & Skutch, A. F. 1989. A guide to the birds of Costa Rica. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 440 pp.

Wilbur, S. R. 1987. Birds of Baja California. Berkeley: University California Press, 253 pp.

Whitacre, D., Ukrain, D. & Falxa, G. 1982. Notes on the hunting behavior and diet of the crested caracara in northeastern Chiapas and Tabasco, Mexico. The Wilson Bulletin, 94: 565-566.

Yosef, R. & Yosef, D. 1992. Hunting behavior of Audubons crested caracara. Journal of Raptor Research, 26: 100-101.

CLAUDIA J. PEREZ-ESTRADA & RICARDO RODRIGUEZ-ESTRELLA *

Centro de Investigaciones Biologicas del Noroeste, S.C. (CIBNOR), Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 195, Colonia Playa Palo de Santa Rita, C.P.23096, La Paz, Baja California Sur, Mexico. claudiap@cibnor.mx, * estrella@cibnor.mx

Recibido: 13/10/2015; aceptado: 17/02/2016
COPYRIGHT 2016 Instituto de Ecologia, A.C.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2016 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:Nota Cientifica (Short Communication)
Author:Perez-Estrada, Claudia J.; Rodriguez-Estrella, Ricardo
Publication:Acta Zoologica Mexicana (nueva serie)
Date:Jan 1, 2016
Words:1677
Previous Article:Herbivoria en cicadas (Cycadophyta) por adultos de Janbechynea elongata Jacoby, 1888 (Coleoptera: Orsodacnidae) en el ANP Sierra de Otontepec,...
Next Article:Anfibios y reptiles asociados a cinco coberturas de la tierra, municipio de Dibulla, La Guajira, Colombia.
Topics:

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2019 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters