Printer Friendly

Demand for Junk food increases after recreational marijuana legalization.

Summary: Washington [US], Mar 1 (ANI): A recent study has found a between state recreational marijuana legalization and increased consumption of certain high-calorie foods.

Washington [US], Mar 1 ( ANI): A recent study has found a between state recreational marijuana legalization and increased consumption of certain high-calorie foods.

It's an infamous pop culture portrayal. After smoking marijuana, the main characters in the movie go on an epic junk-food binge, consuming mass quantities of chips, cookies, and whatever other high-calorie, salt-or-sugar-laden snacks they can get.

A study released this month from a UConn economist found a link between state recreational marijuana legalization and increased consumption of certain high-calorie foods, suggesting there may be something more substantial to the urban myth of "the munchies."

Published by theSocial Science Research Network, the study looked at data on monthly purchases of cookies, chips, and ice cream from grocery, convenience, drug, and mass distribution stores in more than 2,000 counties in the United States over a 10-year period. The data, largely taken from the Nielsen Retail Scanner database, covers 52 designated market areas in the 48 contiguous states.

The researchers compared purchasing trends to the implementation dates for recreational marijuana laws in states including Colorado, Oregon, and Washington. Their analysis showed that legalizing recreational marijuana led to a 3.1 per cent increase in ice cream purchases, a 4.1 per cent increase in cookie purchases, and a 5.3 per cent increase in chip purchases immediately after recreational marijuana sales began. While increases in ice cream and chip purchases reduced slightly in the months following legalization, the increase for cookie purchases remains high.

"These might seem like small numbers. But they're statistically significant and economically significant as well," said Michele Baggio.

The trend was consistent across the three legalizing states included in the study. Additional states that have also legalized recreational marijuana were not included in the study because 18 months of purchasing data were not yet available for those states.

While Baggio initially set out to see whether ties existed between marijuana legalization and increased obesity rates, this study did not delve into an analysis of obesity rates, instead focusing strictly on trends in sales data. Further analysis of health trends may come at a later date, but he says that both the growing marijuana industry and policymakers may find the developing research around varying aspects of marijuana legalization of interest when considering future policies.

"I'm not an advocate for legalization or not. I'm just interested in whether there are unintended consequences to the policy," said Baggio. ( ANI)

Copyright [c] 2019 aninews.in All rights reserved. Provided by SyndiGate Media Inc. ( Syndigate.info ).

COPYRIGHT 2019 SyndiGate Media Inc.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2019 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:Asian News International
Date:Mar 3, 2019
Words:440
Previous Article:MHA surveillance notification doesn't infringe upon Right to Privacy: Centre to SC.
Next Article:Srinagar: Police arrest terror suspect involved in weapon snatching case.
Topics:

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2020 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters