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DUTIES ON MEXICAN CEMENT IMPORTS REMAIN INTACT AS MEXICAN PRODUCERS' APPEAL IS REJECTED BY COURT

 DUTIES ON MEXICAN CEMENT IMPORTS REMAIN INTACT
 AS MEXICAN PRODUCERS' APPEAL IS REJECTED BY COURT
 HOUSTON, April 9 /PRNewswire/ -- The U.S. Court of International Trade today issued a ruling upholding the U.S. International Trade Commission's (ITC) August 1990 decision that U.S. cement producers were injured by Mexican cement imports that were dumped at unfair prices in the southern tier of the United States. The result of this ruling is that the antidumping order on U.S. imports of Mexican cement will remain in effect, and importers of cement from Mexico will continue to be required to pay estimated duties of up to 60 percent on all imports of Mexican cement.
 "The court's ruling upholding the ITC's injury finding is a welcome, but not unexpected, development for the U.S. cement industry," stated Clarence C. Comer, president and chief executive officer of Southdown, Inc. (NYSE: SDW) and chairman of the committee of U.S. cement producers that brought the case before the ITC and the Commerce Department.
 Joe Dorn, a partner with Kilpatrick & Cody, counsel for the U.S. petitioners, stated, "The court's ruling affirms the ITC's finding that high volumes of dumped imports from Mexico adversely affected U.S. cement prices and harmed U.S. producers' profitability and ability to invest. As a result of the court's decision, the duties imposed on Mexican cement imports to remedy dumping will stay in place and prevent a recurrence of unfair pricing in the U.S. market."
 The ITC decision upheld by the court is based on a petition filed in September 1989 alleging that dumped imports of cement and clinker from Mexico were materially injuring or threatening to materially injure U.S. producers of gray portland cement and clinker located in certain states in the southernmost portion of the United States. The Commerce Department found that Mexican producers were selling cement to the United States at substantially lower prices than to their customers in Mexico. The average dumping margin was 58 percent of the customs value of the cement. The Commerce Department recently reconsidered its ruling with respect to Cemex, S.A., the largest Mexican producer and exporter of cement, and increased the dumping margin on imports of cement from Cemex to 60 percent.
 In May of 1991, the U.S. also imposed antidumping duties on all imported cement from Japan. In addition, antidumping and countervailing duty cases against cement imports from Venezuela were concluded earlier this year with agreements by Venezuelan exporters not to dump cement in the United States and by the Venezuelan Government not to subsidize exports of cement to the United States.
 The petitioning U.S. cement producers in the case against dumped Mexican cement imports are represented by Kilpatrick & Cody, an Atlanta- based law firm with offices in Washington and London. Kilpatrick & Cody represented the petitioners in the antidumping case against cement imports from Japan and the antidumping and countervailing duty cases against cement imports from Venezuela.
 Southdown is one of the leading U.S. cement and ready-mixed concrete companies. The company manufactures cement in eight plant locations around the country and markets ready-mixed concrete in Florida and southern California. In addition, the company has entered the environmental services business and is engaged in waste processing, recycling and resource recovery.
 -0- 4/9/92
 /CONTACT: James L. Persky or Karen A. Twitchell of Southdown, 713-650-6200; or Joseph W. Dorn or Martin M. McNerney of Kilpatrick & Cody, 202-508-5800/
 (SDW) CO: Southdown Inc. ST: Texas IN: CST SU:


TS -- NY059 -- 6785 04/09/92 12:34 EDT
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Apr 9, 1992
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