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DOT SEEKS TO HAVE OTHER AIRLINES TAKE OVER PAN AM ROUTES

 DOT SEEKS TO HAVE OTHER AIRLINES TAKE OVER PAN AM ROUTES
 WASHINGTON, Dec. 4 /PRNewswire/ -- Shortly after Pan American World Airways ceased operations, the Department of Transportation moved quickly to ask U.S. carriers to take over Pan Am's international routes, Secretary of Transportation Samuel K. Skinner said today.
 The department issued a notice requesting applications from airlines interested in providing temporary replacement service on Pan Am's remaining international routes. The notice asks for replies later today.
 At the same time, the department was seeking to enlist other carriers to honor the tickets of Pan Am passengers.
 Skinner said: "We are saddened by the unexpected end of the 64- year-old airline that pioneered scheduled international flights across the oceans. The story of Pan Am parallels the history of U.S. aviation.
 "We are trying to minimize the impact of Pan Am's collapse on the traveling public, and on Pan Am employees and their families. Specifically, we are hoping to enlist U.S. carriers to provide service to those holding Pan Am tickets."
 The secretary has talked with several airlines to discuss the possibility of hiring Pan Am employees.
 Skinner said he expects United and Delta airlines will honor any passenger ticket guarantee commitments made in connection with the purchase of Pan Am assets.
 The department also is talking with other U.S. carriers in an effort to determine whether and to what extent they will honor Pan Am tickets.
 The notice asking interested carriers to propose service on at least 16 international routes operated by Pan Am, mainly to Central and South America, was issued at midday. Applications were requested by 4:30 p.m. today, and the department said it might grant temporary exemption authority for some routes as early as Thursday.
 The Federal Aviation Administration also is taking steps to assure that airlines taking over Pan Am routes will have the necessary slots at airports in New York, Chicago and Washington.
 Pan Am pioneered many aspects of modern aviation. In 1931, it developed four-engine giant seaplanes used on oceanic flights. In 1935, it launched the first scheduled service across the Pacific, and in 1939, it launched similar service across the Atlantic. In 1958, Pan Am became the first U.S. airline to fly a commercial jetliner, the Boeing 707.
 -0- 12/4/91
 /CONTACT: Ed O'Hara of the U.S. Department of Transportation, 202-366-5571/ CO: U.S. Department of Transportation; Pan American World Airways ST: District of Columbia IN: AIR SU: EXE


MH-DC -- DC022 -- 9369 12/04/91 16:35 EST
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Date:Dec 4, 1991
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