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DOE ISSUES CALL FOR PROPOSALS FOR CLEAN COAL ROUND V

 DOE ISSUES CALL FOR PROPOSALS FOR CLEAN COAL ROUND V
 WASHINGTON, July 2 /PRNewswire/ -- With the goal of demonstrating


technologies that can help meet the energy and environmental demands of the post-2000 era, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued the fifth and final of its originally scheduled solicitations in the multi-billion dollar Clean Coal Technology Demonstration (CCT) program.
 The solicitation was made through release of the Program Opportunity Notice (PON) for Clean Coal Round V. Proposals are due by Dec. 7, 1992, and DOE expects to announce its selections by May 6, 1993.
 In the PON, DOE is emphasizing projects that would demonstrate super-clean, high efficiency coal-based systems. Improved environmental performance is likely to become increasingly important as utilities and other energy companies seek ways to meet expected growth in energy demand while complying with the more stringent emission standards now going into effect. The 1990 Clean Air Act, for example, permanently caps electric utility sulfur dioxide emissions nationwide in the year 2000. Emission standards for other pollutants, including nitrogen oxides, are also likely to be tightened for new and modified units.
 Higher efficiency -- that is, producing more useful power from a given amount of coal -- also reduces emissions of carbon dioxide, one of several so-called "greenhouse gases."
 Approximately $568 million in federal matching funds will be made available by DOE for the projects selected in this round of the CCT program.
 According to James G. Randolph, assistant secretary for fossil energy, the focus on post-2000 energy and environmental needs represents a continuing shift in the CCT program. "In stressing these ultra-clean power systems, we are setting our sights more on the long-range future of coal. Earlier rounds of the program focused on technologies that addressed the more near-term emissions standards, which were dictated largely by concerns over acid rain," said Randolph. "By extending our sights, we are attempting to ensure that the CCT program yields a complete complement of technologies that can maintain coal's viability both in the near-term and beyond the year 2000."
 Presently, 42 projects are underway or have been completed in the previous four rounds of the CCT program which began in 1986. These projects, which involve joint government/industry funding totaling $4.6 billion, are located in 20 states.
 Unlike the previous rounds, Round V will allow government cost- sharing for certain activities outside the demonstration facility itself -- such as pilot plant tests to help verify design and select project materials. Under the provisions of the PON, DOE's share of the cost of these activities would be limited to 10 percent of its overall contribution to the project, and no government funds could be used to build new testing facilities. These provisions were added to attract newer, more innovative technologies for this round of competition.
 The PON describes the criteria under which the proposed projects will be evaluated. A panel of government reviewers will judge the proposed demonstration projects based upon the readiness of the technology, the adequacy and relevance of the demonstration, environmental, health and safety issues, the management of the project, cost/financial considerations and the technology's potential for commercialization. The PON also describes the mechanism for the repayment of the government's funding contribution to each project pending its successful commercialization. These repayment provisions are identical to the requirements used in the third and fourth rounds of the program.
 In drafting the solicitation, DOE received input from both industry and public sources as well as the Congress. Two public meetings were held last year to receive industry input, and a draft solicitation was distributed in April of this year for comments.
 DOE will hold a pre-proposal conference on Aug. 6, 1992, at the DOE Headquarters Auditorium in Washington to clarify any specific questions related to the solicitation.
 To receive a copy of the PON, contact: U.S. Department of Energy, P.O. Box 2500, Attn: Document Control Specialist, PR-33, Washington, D.C. 20013. Copies are also available in Room 1J-005, Forrestal Building, 1000 Independence Ave. S.W., Washington, between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. weekdays.
 -0- 7/2/92
 /CONTACT: Joey Lucas of the U.S. Department of Energy, 202-586-5810/ CO: U.S. Department of Energy ST: District of Columbia IN: OIL SU: EXE


DC -- DC008 -- 6216 07/02/92 13:43 EDT
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Date:Jul 2, 1992
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