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DOE'S LOS ALAMOS LAB, CRAY RESEARCH SIGN FIRST R&D AGREEMENTS BASED ON MODEL FOR COMPUTER INDUSTRY

 DOE'S LOS ALAMOS LAB, CRAY RESEARCH SIGN FIRST R&D AGREEMENTS
 BASED ON MODEL FOR COMPUTER INDUSTRY
 WASHINGTON, March 27 /PRNewswire/ -- Secretary of Energy James D. Watkins today presided over the signing of the first cooperative research and development agreements (CRADAs) based on a model agreement for cost-shared ventures between Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories and the computer industry.
 Just last Friday, President Bush, as part of his economic and domestic agenda of initiatives to promote sustained economic growth and new jobs, announced agreement between government and industry on the model CRADA.
 "The agreements signed today are further proof that we can combine the extraordinary research capabilities of our national laboratories with the commercial capabilities of U.S. business to address the most challenging technological problems," Admiral Watkins said.
 "These are important steps forward for two Bush administration initiatives -- the High Performance Computing and Communications Program and the National Technology Initiative. It is gratifying to see the model agreement for joint activities by our laboratories and computer firms announced by President Bush only a week ago bear fruit so quickly."
 The computing and communications program is designed to extend U.S. leadership in all areas of computing and networking by developing next generation hardware, networks, and software. The National Technology Initiative (NTI) has been undertaken to encourage U.S. businesses to take advantage of research sponsored by the federal government to develop commercial products and services that are competitive in global markets.
 The three CRADAs signed today launch joint computer research ventures by DOE's Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Cray Research Inc. The goals of the three CRADAs are:
 -- To develop a more accurate oceanic-atmospheric model for studying global climate change.
 -- To reduce the cost of designing and developing advanced computer chips by developing advanced software to simulate electromagnetic wave effects in ultrahigh speed electronic devices.
 -- To improve computational chemistry capabilities required to meet industrial needs to model large protein molecules containing more than 1,000 atoms. Today's modeling systems limit studies of molecular dynamics to molecules of a few hundred atoms.
 A CRADA is one of a number of mechanisms used to facilitate joint, government-business research and development ventures. DOE laboratories now have entered into 95 CRADAs, but few have been with companies in the computer industry. The model CRADA announced last week addressed special issues affecting the industry and is expected to accelerate the number of CRADAs with computer companies and reduce the time it takes to negotiate them.
 Emphasizing the importance of joint research agreements with the computer industry, Watkins said: "American economic growth and especially employment growth depend on our ability to compete worldwide. As we move forward into the 21st century, America's economic competitiveness and strength will turn on our ability to maintain our technological edge. Nowhere is this more true than in the computer industry. Cooperative research with this industry, represented by the agreements being signed today, marks a new era in global competition."
 The terms of the LANL-Cray CRADAs provide for approximately $1 million in support of the three projects by Cray and about $650,000 by DOE over a two-year period.
 Today's agreements were signed by John A. Rollwagen, chairman and chief executive officer of Cray Research, and Dr. Sig Hecker, director of LANL. Cray, headquartered in Eagan, Minn., manufactures, markets and supports large-scale, high-performance computer systems. LANL is a multidisciplinary research organization that applies science and technology to problems of national security ranging from defense to energy research. It is operated for DOE by the University of California.
 -0- 3/27/92
 /CONTACT: Steve Conway for Cray Research, 612-683-7100; Jim Danneskiold for the DOE's Los Alamos National Laboratory, 505-667-7000; or Phil Keif of the Department of Energy, 202-586-5806/ CO: Department of Energy; Cray Research; Los Alamos National
 Laboratory ST: District of Columbia IN: CPR SU:


SB -- DC016 -- 2454 03/27/92 15:28 EST
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Date:Mar 27, 1992
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