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DNA and RNA Sample Preparation Markets: Market Developments, Growth Areas and Opportunities.

NEW YORK, Sept. 8, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue:

DNA and RNA Sample Preparation Markets: Market Developments, Growth Areas and Opportunities http://www.reportlinker.com/p02357969/DNA-and-RNA-Sample-Preparation-Markets-Market-Developments-Growth-Areas-and-Opportunities.html

Biopharm Reports has carried out a comprehensive global end-user study and market analysis relating to the use of DNA and RNA sample preparation techniques in the laboratory. Market findings from this study are based on 'real world' laboratory data, provided by research scientists and clinicians who routinely use nucleic acid isolation methods. This study investigated 45 market areas on current activities, recent developments and trends, anticipated future growth, shrinkage and opportunities. Its findings provide market information on the current and developing use of nucleic acid isolation methods and assist companies selling into these markets to respond to laboratory users' current needs and their future plans.

Biopharm Reports specialises in carrying out market studies of techniques and applications used in life science laboratories and clinics. All our studies involve the participation of scientists and clinicians and investigate in-depth, key areas of their current use of specialised laboratory techniques, and their plans for using these techniques over the next three years.

Background Extraction methods used to isolate DNA and RNA are fundamental to most studies carried out in the molecular biology field. These molecules are isolated prior to downstream processing for a wide range of applications, from fundamental research to routine diagnostic and therapeutic decision-making. In the past, methods used to extract nucleic acids were often complex, time-consuming, labour-intensive and limited in throughput. Today, many specialized methods are available to scientists, from conventional solution-based approaches, to solid-phase systems that are often used in commercial kits. Developments in this field are allowing scientists to evaluate new techniques in their own areas of application. Some of these are also amenable to automation, an increasing requirement in many of today's laboratories. Biopharm Reports has carried out a global market study of DNA and RNA isolation techniques involving the participation of 227 experienced end-users in this field. Participants mean 'years of experience' in the use of DNA and RNA isolation techniques was 14.4 years and the findings of this study provide a wealth of information relevant to suppliers in this field. In particular, these findings relate to end-users current and three-year plans, as well as their anticipated purchasing decisions from particular suppliers over the next three years (2013 - 2016).

This study was carried out to provide business information to developers, manufacturers and suppliers in the DNA/RNA extraction/isolation field. Its findings identify marketing and sales opportunities, end-user purchasing decisions, market growth and shrinkage and related information. It was conducted through specialist groups of experienced end-users in the DNA/RNA extraction/isolation field and its findings are therefore based on 'real world' market data.

Index Executive Summary Chapter 1. Background 1.1 Introduction 1.2 Background 1.3 Study Questions Chapter 2. Study Participants Summary 2.1 This Chapter 2.2 Market Questions 2.3 Countries 2.4 Regions 2.5 Participant Positions 2.6 Participant Experience 2.7 Participant Organisations 2.8 Participant Fields 2.9 Discussion and Opportunities

Chapter 3. DNA and RNA Forms Summary 3.1 This Chapter 3.2 Market Questions 3.3 Current DNA and RNA Forms 3.4 Other Forms 3.5 Future DNA and RNA Forms 3.6 Other Forms 3.7 Comparative Analysis 3.8 Discussion and Opportunities Chapter 4. Solutions-Phase vs. Solid-Phase Methods Summary 4.1 This Chapter 4.2 Market Questions 4.3 Current Solution-Phase vs. Solid-Phase 4.4 Other Techniques 4.5 Future Solution-Phase vs. Solid-Phase 4.6 Other Techniques 4.7 Discussion and Opportunities Chapter 5. Kit vs. Non-Kit Methods

Summary 5.1 This Chapter 5.2 Market Questions 5.3 Current Kit vs. Non-Kit Methods 5.4 Future Kit vs. Non-Kit Methods 5.5 Current use of Kits in all Nucleic Acid (NA) Forms 5.6 Future use of Kits in all Nucleic Acid Forms 5.7 Current use of Non-Kit Methods for all Nucleic Acid Forms 5.8 Future use of Non-Kit Methods for all Nucleic Acid Forms 5.9 Current Other Methods Overall 5.10 Future Other Methods Overall 5.11 Current Methods for Genomic DNA 5.12 Future Methods for Genomic DNA 5.13 Current Methods for MicroRNA 5.14 Future Methods for MicroRNA 5.15 Current Methods for mRNA 5.16 Future Methods for mRNA 5.17 Current Methods for Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) 5.18 Future Methods for Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) 5.19 Current Methods for SiRNA 5.20 Future Methods for SiRNA 5.21 Current Methods for snRNA 5.22 Future Methods for snRNA 5.23 Current Methods for tRNA 5.24 Future Methods for tRNA 5.25 Main Method 5.26 Discussion and Opportunities Chapter 6. Solution-Phase DNA/RNA Isolation (Non-Kits) Summary 6.1 This Chapter 6.2 Market Questions 6.3 Current Preferred Methods 6.4 Current Preferred Suppliers 6.5 Future Preferred Methods 6.6 Future Preferred Suppliers 6.7 Advantages and Disadvantages 6.8 Discussion and Opportunities

Chapter 7. Solid-Phase DNA/RNA Isolation (Non-Kits) 7.1 This Chapter 7.2 Market Questions 7.3 Current Preferred Methods 7.4 Current Preferred Suppliers 7.5 Future Preferred Methods 7.6 Future Preferred Suppliers 7.7 Advantages and Disadvantages 7.8 Discussion and Opportunities Chapter 8. Isolation Kits 8.1 This Chapter 8.2 Market Questions 8.3 DNA Kits - Current Preferred Suppliers 8.4 DNA - Current Preferred Kits 8.5 DNA Kits C Future Preferred Suppliers 8.6 DNA - Future Preferred Kits 8.7 RNA Kits - Current Preferred Suppliers 8.8 Current Preferred RNA Kits 8.9 RNA Kits C Future Preferred Suppliers 8.10 RNA - Future Preferred Kits 8.11 Advantages and Disadvantages 8.12 Discussion and Opportunities

Chapter 9. Automation 9.1 This Chapter 9.2 Market Questions 9.3 Use of Automated Methods 9.4 Current Automated Methods 9.5 Future Automated Methods 9.6 DNA Isolation - Preferred Companies 9.7 DNA Isolation - Methods 9.8 RNA isolation - Preferred Companies 9.9 RNA isolation - Methods 9.10 Discussion and Opportunities Chapter 10. Applications 10.1 This Chapter 10.2 Market Questions 10.3 Current Applications 10.4 Future Applications 10.5 Discussion and Opportunities Chapter 11. Therapeutic Areas 11.1 This Chapter 11.2 Market Questions 11.3 Therapeutic Areas 11.4 Discussion and Opportunities

Chapter 12. Purpose 12.1 This Chapter 12.2 Market Questions 12.3 Specialist Areas 12.4 Purpose 12.5 Discussion and Opportunities Chapter 13. Samples 13.1 This Chapter 13.2 Market Questions 13.3 Study Samples 13.4 Discussion and Opportunities Chapter 14. Disease Biomarkers 14.1 This Chapter 14.2 Market Questions 14.3 Study of Disease Biomarkers 14.4 Current Disease Biomarkers 14.5 Future Disease Biomarkers 14.6 Biomarker utility 14.7 Discussion and Opportunities

Chapter 15. Budgets and Expenditure 15.1 This Chapter 15.2 Market Questions 15.3 Cost per Sample (Non-Kit) 15.4 Cost per Sample (Kit) 15.5 Current Budget Breakdown 15.6 Future Budgets 15.7 Discussion and Opportunities Chapter 16. Consumables 16.1 This Chapter 16.2 Market Questions 16.3 Consumables 16.4 Discussion and Opportunities Chapter 17. Discussion and Opportunities 17.1 Discussion and Opportunities Appendices

Figures Figure 2.1 Top ten countries and the percentages of individuals who participated in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 2.2 Regions and associated percentages of individuals who participated in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 2.3 Professional positions (and %) of individuals who participated in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 2.4 Participants' 'years of experience' in the use of techniques to extract DNA and RNA (Study DNA RNA 2014) Figure 2.5 Organisation types indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 2.6 Field types indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 3.1 Current nucleic acid forms studied by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 3.2 Nucleic acid forms anticipated to be studied in three years from now, by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 4.1 Current techniques used for the isolation of DNA or RNA, indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 4.2 Future techniques used for the isolation of DNA or RNA, indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 5.1 Overall current use of kit and non-kit methods for the isolation of DNA and RNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 5.2 Overall anticipated use of kit and non-kit methods for the isolation of DNA and RNA in three years from now, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 5.3 Current use of kits for the isolation of all nucleic acid forms, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 5.4 Anticipated use of kits for the isolation of all nucleic acid forms in three years from now, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 5.5 Current use of non-kit methods or the isolation of all nucleic acid forms, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 5.6 Anticipated use of non-kit methods or the isolation of all nucleic acid forms in three years from now, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 5.7 Current use of other isolation methods for all NA forms, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 5.8 Use of other isolation methods for all NA forms in three years from now, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 5.9 Current isolation methods for genomic DNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 5.10 Anticipated use of isolation methods for genomic DNA in three years from now, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 5.11 Current isolation methods for microRNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 5.12 Isolation methods anticipated to be used for microRNA in three years from now, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 5.13 Current isolation methods for microRNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 5.14 Isolation methods anticipated to be used for microRNA in three years from now, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 5.15 Current isolation methods for ribosomal RNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 5.16 Isolation methods anticipated to be used for ribosomal RNA in three years from now, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 5.17 Current isolation methods for SiRNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 5.18 Isolation methods anticipated to be used for SiRNA in three years from now, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 5.19 Current isolation methods for snRNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 5.20 Isolation methods anticipated to be used for snRNA in three years from now, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 5.21 Current isolation methods for tRNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 5.22 Isolation methods anticipated to be used for tRNA in three years from now, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 5.23 Main methods used for the isolation of DNA and RNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 5.24 Changes in the use of Kit and Non-Kit methods over the next three years (2014 C 2016), reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 6.1 The top five current solution phase (non-kit) methods for the extraction of DNA/RNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 6.2 Top current preferred suppliers of solution phase (non-kit) products for the extraction of DNA/RNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 6.3 The top five preferred solution-phase (non-kit) methods for the isolation of DNA/RNA in three years from now, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 6.4 Top preferred suppliers of solution phase (non-kit) methods for the isolation of DNA/RNA in three years from now, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 6.5 Advantages of solution phase (non-kit) methods for the isolation of DNA/RNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 6.6 Disadvantages of solution phase (non-kit) methods for the isolation of DNA/RNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 7.1 Top current preferred solid-phase (non-kit) methods for the isolation of DNA/RNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 7.2 Top current preferred suppliers of solid-phase (non-kit) methods for the isolation of DNA/RNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 7.3 Top anticipated preferred solid-phase (non-kit) methods for the isolation of DNA/RNA in three years from now, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 7.4 Top anticipated preferred suppliers of solid-phase (non-kit) methods for the isolation of DNA/RNA in three years from now, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 7.5 Advantages of solid-phase (non-kit) methods for the isolation of DNA/RNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 7.6 Disadvantages of solid-phase (non-kit) methods for the isolation of DNA/RNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 8.1 Preferred current suppliers of kits for isolating DNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 8.2 Preferred anticipated future suppliers of kits for isolating DNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 8.3 Current preferred suppliers of kits for isolating RNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 8.4 Future preferred suppliers of kits for isolating RNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 8.5 The advantages of using DNA and RNA isolation kits, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 8.6 The disadvantages of using DNA and RNA isolation kits, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 9.1 The use of automated methods for the isolation of DNA and RNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 9.2 The current percentage of DNA and RNA isolation methods that are automated, indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 who use automated methods Figure 9.3 The percentage of DNA/RNA isolation methods anticipated to be automated in three years from now, indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 who use automated methods Figure 9.4 Top five preferred companies for the automation of DNA isolation, indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 who currently use automated methods Figure 9.5 Top three preferred companies for the automation of RNA isolation, indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 who currently use automated methods Figure 10.1 Top current applications associated with DNA and RNA isolation methods, used by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 10.2 Top applications associated with DNA and RNA isolation methods that are anticipated to be used in three years from now, by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 11.1 Top therapeutic areas associated with DNA and RNA isolation methods used by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 12.1 Top specialist areas associated with the use of DNA and RNA isolation methods, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 12.2 Top purposes or reasons associated with the use of DNA and RNA isolation methods, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 13.1 Top study samples processed using DNA and RNA isolation methods used by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 14.1 The study of disease biomarkers associated with the use of DNA and RNA isolation methods, indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 14.1 Top current disease biomarkers associated wit h the use of DNA and RNA isolation methods, indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 14.2 Top disease biomarkers associated with the use of DNA and RNA isolation methods anticipated to be studied three years from now, indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 14.3 Top disease biomarkers clinical utilities relating to their use of DNA and RNA isolation methods, indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 15.1 Per-sample non-kits costs and associated percentages of end-users, indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 15.2 Per-sample kits costs and associated percentages of end-users, indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 15.3 Budget costing areas relating to the isolation of DNA and RNA, indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Figure 16.1 Top three consumables (by cost) in the isolation of DNA or RNA, indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Appendix 1. Top three consumables (by cost) used in the isolation of DNA or RNA, indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014

Tables Table 2.1 Countries, percentages and numbers (No) of individuals who participated in DNA RNA 2014 Table 2.1 Countries, percentages and numbers (No) of individuals who participated in DNA RNA 2014 Table 2.2 Regions, associated percentages and numbers (No) of individuals who participated in DNA RNA 2014 Table 2.3 Professional positions (% and number, No) of individuals who participated in DNA RNA 2014 Table 2.4 Participants' 'years of experience' in the use of techniques to extract DNA and RNA (Study DNA RNA 2014) Table 2.4 Participants' 'years of experience' in the use of techniques to extract DNA and RNA (Study DNA RNA 2014) Table 2.5 Organisation types indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 2.6 Field types indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 2.7 Other field types indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 3.1 Current nucleic acid forms (as % total) and those anticipated to be studied three years from now (as a % of total), indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 6.1 Current solution-phase (non-kit) methods for the isolation of DNA/RNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 6.2 Current preferred suppliers of solution phase (non-kit) products for the extraction of DNA/RNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 6.3 Preferred solution-phase (non-kit) methods for the isolation of DNA/RNA in three years from now, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 6.4 Preferred suppliers of solution phase (non-kit) methods for the isolation of DNA/RNA in three years from now, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 6.5 Advantages of solution phase (non-kit) methods for the isolation of DNA/RNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 6.6 Disadvantages of solution phase (non-kit) methods for the isolation of DNA/RNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 7.1 Current preferred solid-phase (non-kit) methods for the isolation of DNA/RNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 7.2 Current preferred suppliers of solid-phase (non-kit) methods for the isolation of DNA/RNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 7.3 Anticipated preferred solid-phase (non-kit) methods for the isolation of DNA/RNA in three years from now, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 7.4 Anticipated preferred suppliers of solid-phase (non-kit) methods for the isolation of DNA/RNA in three years from now, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 7.5 Advantages of solid-phase (non-kit) methods for the isolation of DNA/RNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 7.6 Disadvantages of solid-phase (non-kit) methods for the isolation of DNA/RNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 8.1 Preferred current suppliers of kits for isolating DNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 8.2 Preferred kits currently for isolating DNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 8.3 Preferred anticipated future suppliers of kits for isolating DNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 DNA RNA 2014 Table 8.4 Future preferred kits for isolating DNA reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Continued Table 8.4 Future preferred kits for isolating DNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Continued Table 8.4 Future preferred kits for isolating DNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 8.5 Current preferred suppliers of kits for isolating RNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 8.6 Current preferred kits for isolating RNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 8.7 Future preferred suppliers of kits for isolating RNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 8.8 Future preferred suppliers of kits for isolating RNA, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 9.1 Preferred companies for the automation of DNA isolation, indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 who currently use automated methods Table 9.2 Automation platforms and companies for DNA isolation, indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 9.3 Preferred companies for the automation of RNA isolation, indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 who currently use automated methods Table 9.4 Automation methods and companies for RNA isolation, indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 10.1 Current applications associated with DNA and RNA isolation methods, used by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 10.2 Applications associated with DNA and RNA isolation methods that are anticipated to be used in three years from now, by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 11.1 Therapeutic areas associated with DNA and RNA isolation methods used by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 12.1 Specialist areas associated with the use of DNA and RNA isolation methods, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 12.2 Purposes or reasons associated with the use of DNA and RNA isolation methods, reported by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 13.1 Study samples processed using DNA and RNA isolation methods used by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 14.1 Current disease biomarkers associated with the use of DNA and RNA isolation methods, indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 14.2 Disease biomarkers associated with the use of DNA and RNA isolation methods anticipated to be studied three years from now, indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 14.3 Disease biomarkers clinical utilities relating to their use of DNA and RNA isolation methods, indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 15.1 Per-sample non-kits costs and associated percentages of end-users, indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 15.2 Per-sample kits costs and associated percentages of end-users, indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 15.3 Budget costing areas relating to the isolation of DNA and RNA, indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 15.4 Future overall budget relating to the isolation of DNA and RNA, indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Table 16.1 Top three consumables (by cost) used in the isolation of DNA or RNA, indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014 Appendix 1. Top three consumables (by cost) used in the isolation of DNA or RNA, indicated by participants in DNA RNA 2014

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