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DIRECTTALK LETS COMPUTER INFORMATION SPEAK FOR ITSELF; IBM VOICE PROCESSING SYSTEM NOW RUNS ON STANDARD COMPUTERS

 DIRECTTALK LETS COMPUTER INFORMATION SPEAK FOR ITSELF;
 IBM VOICE PROCESSING SYSTEM NOW RUNS ON STANDARD COMPUTERS
 WHITE PLAINS, N.Y., Sept. 29 /PRNewswire/ -- Banks, hospitals, public utilities, state and local governments, and many other groups can now be far more creative in how they get information by phone to people who need it, whether they are customers, patients, the general public, or their own employees.
 IBM Corporation (NYSE: IBM) made this possible today through improvements to its voice processing system that make these creative approaches more widely available and more cost-effective. Taken together, the improvements offer advantages no other system can provide.
 The DirectTalk (see Note A) voice processing system automates the process of disseminating useful and sometimes vital information by giving callers access, via the telephone keypad, to a broad variety of information typically stored in computers.
 DirectTalk is part of IBM's CallPath(A) family of products that allow phone and computer systems to work together as a single, integrated system. Businesses can choose between DirectTalk versions for either OS/2(A)- or Unix-based computers.
 A big advantage of the new DirectTalk/2(A) release is that IBM has opened it up so it runs on a large number of personal computers. Unlike other voice processing systems available today, the functions it offers aren't restricted to one specific machine.
 DirectTalk/2 Version 1 Release 1 runs on IBM's new OS/2 Version 2.0 software, which has already been certified to run on more than 250 personal computers that support the Industry Standard Architecture.
 A new text-to-speech feature, which converts stored computer information into synthesized speech, allows the system to "talk" to callers. Because this feature saves the time and expense of having to make voice recordings of all available information, there are few limitations on what computerized information, and how much of it, can be affordably supplied to callers.
 The general public can benefit from this feature, for example, when utility companies use it to notify service personnel of their next service call. DirectTalk can "read" the customer's name and address as well as a description of the problem to them over the phone. When a quick response is needed, DirectTalk can help save critical minutes.
 The new release also allows the system to respond to as many as 24 incoming calls simultaneously, an increase over the previous limit of 16 calls per system. This makes it a cost-effective way to keep pace with a growing business.
 DirectTalk/2 also provides more flexibility by allowing two or more systems on a local area network to act like "clients" and share a single database stored on a "server." Management capabilities make it possible for an administrator to manage all the systems from a single, remote location.
 Other enallers can speak certain information to DirectTalk instead of entering it on a push-button keypad.
 Improved speech recognition capabilities mean the system can ask callers to repeat unclear words as soon as they are spoken. This saves time because they don't have to repeat their entire account number or credit card number when one digit is unclear -- only the one the system doesn't understand.
 Programmers designing applications for DirectTalk can now choose the best of four available voice compression rates so they can make the most of disk storage space as well as improve the voice quality of the responses DirectTalk/2 gives to callers.
 The new release will be available on Dec. 4, 1992. DirectTalk/2 costs range from $17,140 for a 4-line system to $50,955 for a 24-line system.
 (A) -- Indicates trademark or registered trademark of International Business Machines Corporation.
 -0- 9/29/92
 /CONTACT: Clifton Scott of IBM, 914-642-5457/
 (IBM) CO: International Business Machines Corporation ST: New York IN: TLS SU:


GK -- NY017 -- 4249 09/29/92 09:26 EDT
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Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

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Date:Sep 29, 1992
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