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DIRECTORY OF EXPERTS: BRISTOL-MYERS SQUIBB UNRESTRICTED PAIN RESEARCH GRANTS PROGRAM

 DIRECTORY OF EXPERTS:
 BRISTOL-MYERS SQUIBB UNRESTRICTED PAIN RESEARCH GRANTS PROGRAM
 In light of the government's announcement yesterday regarding the need for improved post-surgical pain treatment, the media may be developing follow-up stories.
 To assist members of the media a list of leading pain researchers funded under the Bristol-Myers Squibb Unrestricted Pain Research Grants Program follows. These researchers are available for telephone interviews:
 Jean-Marie Besson, D.Sc. --Founder and Director
 Laboratory of Physiopharmacology of the Nervous System
 Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale,
 Paris, France
 -- Awarded the $50,000 Bristol-Myers Squibb Award for Distinguished Achievement in Pain Research in 1990.
 -- Currently researching a body chemical called serotonin, which plays a key role in inhibiting pain.
 -- Dr. Besson's research is crucial in the effort to create non- opiate, non-addictive painkilling drugs as effective as morphine but free of its side effects.
 Kenneth L. Casey, M.D. -- Professor of Neurology and Physiology,
 University of Michigan
 Chief, Neurology Service Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Ann Arbor,
 Mich.
 -- Principal investigator of five-year Bristol-Myers Squibb no- strings-attached grant awarded to University of Michigan
 -- Currently investigating how nerve cells in the brain signal the perception of pain. The research methods include brain imaging and sensory studies of patients with brain lesions causing increased or decreased pain sensation, and the recording of the electrical activity of individual neurons in experimental animals. How certain drugs relieve pain is also being studied.
 -- Many people with diseases that destroy parts of the brain suffer pain even when there is no obvious source for the pain. Through this research, Dr. Casey hopes to aid in the development of methods for relieving pain in these and similar patients.
 C. Richard Chapman, Ph.D. -- Professor, Department of Anesthesiology
 The Pain Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Wash.
 -- Principal investigator of five-year Bristol-Myers Squibb no- strings-attached grant awarded to The Pain Center, University of Washington.
 -- Current research addresses 1) pain control in cancer; 2) the affective dimension of pain; and 3) measurement of pain and analgesia.
 -- Dr. Chapman's research has developed a human laboratory model for the precise measurement of opioid analgesia and opioid side effects. His clinical research has shown that medical treatment such as opioid therapy for pain can incorporate psychologic principles such as personal control to improve therapeutic outcome.
 Ronald Dubner, DDS, Ph.D. -- Chief, Neurobiology & Anesthesiology
 Branch
 National Institute of Dental Research
 National Institutes of Health
 -- Awarded the $50,000 Bristol-Myers Squibb Award for Distinguished Achievement in Pain Research in 1989.
 -- Currently conducting research which identifies specific pain- sensing cells and their connections in the central nervous system.
 -- This research aims to help people with arthritis and certain types of cancers -- patients whose pain is often neglected.
 Howard Fields, M.D., Ph.D. -- Professor of Neurology & Physiology
 University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine
 San Francisco, Calif.
 -- Principal investigator of five-year Bristol-Myers Squibb no- strings-attached grant awarded to the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine.
 -- Currently researching the brain's pain-enhancing system -- a mechanism that increases the intensity of pain, and may contribute to dependence on painkilling drugs.
 -- Studying the mechanism of action of powerful painkilling drugs such as morphine; seeking new approaches to the treatment of pain.
 Kathleen M. Foley, M.D., -- Chief of Pain Service
 Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
 New York, N.Y.
 -- Principal investigator of five-year Bristol-Myers Squibb no- strings-attached grant awarded to Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.
 -- Currently studying pain control in cancer patients, focusing on the need to separately treat physical symptoms of pain and the psychological consequences.
 -- The goal of Dr. Foley's research is to demonstrate that pain treatment merits the same respect and importance as curing disease.
 Gerald F. Gebhart, Ph.D. -- Professor, Department of Pharmacology
 University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
 -- Principal investigator of five-year Bristol-Myers Squibb no- strings-attached grant awarded to the University of Iowa.
 -- Currently investigating visceral pain, including silent ischemia, and the body's pain-modulating systems.
 -- Dr. Gebhart's research is an important aspect of the study of visceral pain -- pain that relates to internal organs such as the heart, colon, and intestines, as opposed to cutaneous (skin-related) structures.
 John C. Liebeskind, Ph.D. -- Professor of Psychology &
 Anesthesiology
 University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, Calif.
 -- Principal investigator of five-year Bristol-Myers Squibb no- strings-attached grant awarded to the University of California, Los Angeles.
 -- Currently researching the body's pain-inhibition system.
 -- His research investigates the brain's natural capacity to inhibit pain and the brain chemicals responsible for this action.
 Edward R. Perl, M.D. -- Sarah Graham Kenan Professor of Physiology
 University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, N.C.
 -- Awarded the $50,000 Bristol-Myers Squibb Award for Distinguished Achievement in 1991.
 -- Currently studying neural changes that occur after peripheral nerve injury, such as are related to reflex sympathetic dystrophies/causalgia, and phantom limb pain, among others.
 -- Dr. Perl is best known for having demonstrated the existence of tissue damage receptors (nociceptors), their unique properties of sensitization and their selective central nervous connections. These historic findings led to better understanding of pain-specific neurons and their roles in pain related to tissue injury and inflammation. His work paves the way for new drug therapies directed at the source and mechanisms of pain states.
 Patrick D. Wall, D.M., F.R.C.P. -- Director of the Cerebral
 Functions Research Group
 Department of Anatomy & Developmental Biology
 University College London
 -- Awarded the $50,000 Bristol-Myers Squibb Award for Distinguished Achievement in Pain Research in 1988.
 -- Credited with developing in combination with Ronald Melzack, Ph.D., the "gate control" theory, which suggested for the first time that pain signals can be modified along the way to the brain by other stimuli, such as fear or a "light touch" near the injured area.
 -- Dr. Wall's research examines the tenderness that sets in and lingers after an injury -- pain that can be felt far from the damaged area and for hours or even days afterward. His goal is to alleviate this pain by medicating patients with narcotics prior to surgery.
 William D. Willis, Jr., M.D., Ph.D. -- Chairman, Department of
 Anatomy & Neurosciences
 University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, Texas
 -- Principal investigator of five-year Bristol-Myers Squibb no- strings-attached grant awarded to the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston.
 -- Currently researching the mechanism of hyperalgesia -- heightened sensitivity to pain resulting from an injury causing tissue damage -- by recording from spinothalamic cells and showing how changes in these cells affect the skin.
 -- The focus of this research is to better understand the pharmacologic basis for hyperalgesia so that improved drug therapies can be developed.
 Clifford J. Woolf, Ph.D., M.D. -- Wellcome Professor in Neurobiology
 Department of Anatomy & Developmental Biology
 University College London, England
 -- Principal investigator of five-year Bristol-Myers Squibb no- strings-attached grant awarded to the University College London, England.
 -- Currently researching how the nervous system processes sensory information, and why apparent malfunctions in the nervous system cause pain to sometimes be generated by non-damaging stimuli.
 -- Dr. Woolf's research may shed light on new drug therapies to prevent the nervous system from sending pain signals to the spinal cord. This has special implications for post-surgery pain treatment.
 Tony L. Yaksh, Ph.D. -- Professor of Anesthesiology
 University of California, San Diego, San Diego, Calif.
 -- Principal investigator of five-year Bristol-Myers Squibb no- strings-attached grant awarded to the University of California, San Diego.
 -- Currently researching new painkilling drugs that bypass the brain and act in the spinal cord or at the site of injury itself.
 -- This research is aimed at replacing morphine with drugs that do not have this drug's side effects.
 Since its inception in 1988, the Bristol-Myers Squibb Unrestricted Pain Research Grants Program recognizes individuals and institutions who demonstrate excellence in research, education and patient-care programs in the field of pain.
 Please contact Karen Reina or Cherry Dumaual at Lobsenz-Stevens at 212-684-6300, to arrange an interview with any of the above experts or to receive additional information.
 CONTACT: Jonathan Weisberg of Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, 212-546-4343, or Karen Reina of Lobsenz-Stevens, Inc., 212-684-6300, for Bristol-Myers Squibb.
 -0- 3/6/92


CO: Bristol-Myers Squibb Company ST: New York IN: HEA SU:

KD-KW -- NY053 -- 6042 03/06/92 17:14 EST
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Date:Mar 6, 1992
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