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DER OFFICIAL TO ADVISE CONGRESS ON NUCLEAR PLANT SAFETY

 DER OFFICIAL TO ADVISE CONGRESS ON NUCLEAR PLANT SAFETY
 HARRISBURG, Pa., July 21 /PRNewswire/ -- The director of radiation protection in the state Department of Environmental Resources (DER) has been invited by a congressional agency to provide advice on safety issues with aging nuclear power plants.
 William Dornsife is one of 17 nuclear experts from throughout the country who comprise a panel convened by the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment (OTA).
 The panel will work with OTA to identify age-related problems with existing nuclear power plants; waste and safety issues resulting from decommissioning, decontamination and nuclear reactor life extension activities; and the status of nuclear technologies in other nations. A report of the panel's findings is expected by the end of the year.
 DER Secretary Arthur A. Davis said he is pleased that Pennsylvania is represented on the body.
 "More than 100 nuclear power plants across the nation play a vital role in providing our electricity needs, including five here in Pennsylvania," Davis said. "As the plants age, federal and state radiation officials must ensure that they are operated or decommissioned in a manner that provides the utmost safety, both for the environment and nearby residents.
 "I am pleased that Pennsylvania's expertise in nuclear power will help shape the national response to this important issue," Davis said.
 Dornsife received a bachelors degree in chemistry from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1966 and a masters in nuclear engineering from Ohio State University in 1972.
 He joined the DER staff in 1976. Following the Three Mile Island accident in 1979, he became the first chief of the DER's nuclear safety division, responsible for the nuclear safety and low-level radioactive waste programs.
 In his current position, Dornsife is responsible for overall planning, direction and implementation of all state radiation programs, from X-ray registration and inspections to nuclear safety oversight.
 Most nuclear power plants are licensed to operate by the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission for 40 years. Many of the nation's nuclear reactors are more than 15 years old, and the licenses of nearly half of the plants will expire by the year 2015.
 The five nuclear power plants in Pennsylvania are the Beaver Valley Power Station, Beaver County; Berwick/Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Luzerne County; Limerick Generating Station, Montgomery County; Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station, York County; and Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Dauphin County.
 /delval/
 -0- 7/21/92
 /CONTACT: Mary Ellen Bolish of the DER, 717-787-1323/ CO: Department of Environmental Resources ST: Pennsylvania IN: SU:


MP -- PH026 -- 1287 07/21/92 11:34 EDT
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Date:Jul 21, 1992
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