Printer Friendly

DEMOGRAPHY STUDIES FOCUS ON IMMIGRATION REFORM AND CONTROL ACT

 DEMOGRAPHY STUDIES FOCUS ON IMMIGRATION REFORM AND CONTROL ACT
 WASHINGTON, April 24 /PRNewswire/ -- Two studies in the May issue of Demography argue that current U.S. immigration policy to control undocumented migration from Mexico is not effective.
 The studies focus on the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) of 1986, which attempted to check undocumented migration through a series of provisions. These included increased apprehension of undocumented migrants, tough sanctions against employers of these migrants and a legalization program for long-term undocumented migrant residents.
 In one study, Katharine M. Donato, Jorge Durand and Douglas S. Massey analyzed data collected from migrants interviewed in seven Mexican communities during the winters of 1987 through 1989, as well as from out-migrants from those communities subsequently located in the United States.
 They examine changes in migrant behavior before and after IRCA's passage in 1986, as indicated by the probability of taking a first illegal trip, the probability of repeat migration, the probability of apprehension by the Border Patrol, the probability of using a border smuggler and the costs of illegal border-crossing.
 None of these analyses showed that the act had significantly deterred undocumented migration from Mexico. In general, there was little difference in migrant behavior before and after passage of the act.
 The authors argue that international migration is a relatively self-sustaining process, regardless of the law. Once people begin migrating, they are likely to make additional trips. Once a sufficient number of people have become involved in the process, social ties between U.S. employers, migrants and others facilitate the movement of new migrants and encourage the repeated movement of experienced migrants.
 In the other study, Sherrie A. Kossoudji investigated similar issues on the basis of a large national survey in 1978 by the Mexican government. The data set, called the National Survey of Emigration to the Northern Border and to the United States, was collected before the 1986 act and thus is mute to the effect of employer sanctions and amnesty. It is particularly suited to test hypotheses about the effects of border apprehension on migrant behavior.
 Kossoudji tested specific hypotheses (for undocumented Mexican male migrants) about the effects of apprehensions on the actual and desired length of stay in the United States and on the frequency of migration. She found that migrants in the 1970s stayed in the United States longer on non-apprehended trips and in Mexico for shorter spells between trips to compensate for the cost of a past apprehension.
 The study argues that U.S. immigration officials have picked an enforcement strategy that captures some migrants, but it is hopelessly outmaneuvered by the rest of them. As a consequence, resources are spent apprehending the same people repeatedly; by doing so, the Immigration and Naturalization Service, charged with enforcing the 1986 law, recreates the demand for its services without significantly checking the flow into the United States.
 The study by Donato, Durand and Massey is titled "Stemming the Tide? Assessing the Deterrent Effects of the Immigration Reform and Control Act." Donato, the senior author, is an assistant professor of sociology at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, La. Durand and Massey are sociologists, respectively, at Centro de Investigaciones sobre los Movimientos Socieles Universidad de Guadalajara (Mexico) and at the Population Research Center, Department of Sociology, University of Chicago.
 The study by Kossoudji is called "Playing Cat and Mouse at the U.S.-Mexican Border." The author is an assistant professor of economics at The University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Mich.
 Demography is published quarterly by the Population Association of America.
 -0- 4/24/92
 /CONTACT: Katharine M. Donato, 504-388-5357, Douglas S. Massey, 312-702-0787, or Sherrie A. Kossoudji, 313-764-2381/
CO: Population Association of America


ST: IN: SU:

DC -- DC015 -- 2528 04/24/92 14:01 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Apr 24, 1992
Words:626
Previous Article:CAMPBELL CEO CALLS FOR U.S. TO RENEW ECONOMIC STRENGTH
Next Article:CHEVY TO REMAIN FULL-LINE CAR AND TRUCK MARKETER IN THE 1990s AND BEYOND


Related Articles
IMMIGRATION INITIATIVES IN CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURES STRIKE A BLOW FOR GOOD GOVERNMENT
Legal versus illegal U.S. immigration and source country characteristics.
Election 1998: Voters Left Without Leadership on Vital Immigration Policies.
IMMIGRATION FOLLOW-UP PAINTS BLEAK PICTURE.
STUDY SAYS UNDOCUMENTED WORKERS FLOW EBBED.
Ronald Reagan and the Politics of Immigration Reform.
Congress may pass immigration enforcement before recess.
Immigrant families in contemporary society.
Obama gears up for immigration battle.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters