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DEBORAH HEART AND LUNG CENTER TO UNDERTAKE MEDICAL MISSION TO LITHUANIA

DEBORAH HEART AND LUNG CENTER TO UNDERTAKE MEDICAL MISSION TO LITHUANIA

Hospital to Transport 41-Member Medical Team and $1.5 Million Worth of
 Medical Equipment; Will Operate on 20 Lithuanian Children
 BROWNS MILLS, N.J., Sept. 10 /PRNewswire/ -- Deborah Heart and Lung Center, a 155-bed cardiovascular and pulmonary speciality teaching hospital located in Browns Mills, will undertake a humanitarian medical mission to Lithuania, from Sept. 21 to 25.
 The hospital will transport a 41-member medical/surgical team and $1.5 million worth of medical equipment to the Vilnius University Clinic of Cardiac Surgery, Vilnius, Lithuania.
 Deborah physicians will perform open heart surgery on 20 Lithuanian children suffering from congenital heart disease.
 Sixteen members of the Deborah team will depart from JFK International Airport, New York, on Sept. 12, arriving in Lithuania on Sept. 14. They will set up two operating rooms, an intensive care unit and a special care unit at the Vilnius Clinic. The remainder of the medical team will depart from Newark International Airport, Newark, N.J., on Sept. 18, arriving in Lithuania on Sept. 20. All surgeries will be performed between Sept. 21 and 25.
 Eleven members of the Deborah team will return on Sept. 26; the remainder will return on Sept. 29.
 The medical/surgical team consists of 10 doctors, 22 nurses, four perfusionists, two nurse anesthetists, two respiratory therapists, and one bio-medical engineer. Four Deborah administrative/support staff and a three-person video crew will also be traveling to Lithuania.
 In May, Deborah sent an advance team of doctors, nurses and technicians to Lithuania where they observed current practices, surveyed the facilities and equipment, and pre-screened the children who will be operated on in September.
 The Deborah advance team discovered that most of the medical and surgical equipment is 20-30 years old and the city's only cardiac catheterization laboratory is broken. Most of the $1.5 million worth of medical equipment being brought by the Deborah team will be left behind for use by Lithuanian doctors.
 Although Lithuanian physicians currently perform pediatric cardiac surgery on simple congenital heart defects, the more complex cases often go untreated. The 20 children who will be operated on Sept. 21-25 all suffer from complex congenital heart anomalies, which if left untreated, would eventually result in death.
 This medical mission also includes a study program for Lithuanian physicians, which will allow them to learn to operate on more complex heart defects and to improve their overall management of congenital cases. Deborah's medical staff will host lectures, provide videotapes of the surgeries for future reference and make arrangements for a two- year educational program that will have Lithuanian doctors and nurses rotate to Deborah for observation and study.
 Deborah's medical mission to Lithuania falls under the auspices of the hospital's Children of the World program, which was developed to help save the lives of children with acquired or congenital heart defects. Each year, Deborah treats approximately 500 U.S. children and 100 international children for critical heart anomalies.
 In 1990, Deborah undertook a medical mission to the former Soviet Republic of Georgia. The hospital transported a 50-member medical team as well as $3 million of medical equipment and performed 19 successful heart surgeries in a five-day period.
 Founded 70 years ago. Deborah Heart and Lung Center provides diagnosis and treatment of heart, lung and vascular diseases in adults and acquired and congenital heart defects in children.
 In 70 years, Deborah has never rendered a bill for its services to any patient, regardless of ability to pay, accepting third-party insurance reimbursement when available. The philanthropic tradition in which Deborah operates is made possible by the fund-raising efforts of Deborah Hospital Foundation, its 75,000 volunteers, and supporters in industry, labor, private and corporate foundations and fraternal, civic, religious and ethnic organizations.
 The foundation also supports Deborah's Children of the World program. Celebrating its 20th anniversary, the program has sponsored the treatment of nearly 2,000 children from more than 50 countries at Deborah.
 -0- 9/10/92
 /CONTACT: Denise Hill of Rosanio, Bailets & Talamo, 609-488-5500, for Deborah Heart and Lung Center/ CO: Deborah Heart and Lung Center ST: New Jersey IN: HEA SU:


JS-MK -- PH025 -- 8086 09/10/92 14:12 EDT
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Sep 10, 1992
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