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DEALERS GIVE TIPS ON CLEANING AND STORING RIFLES AND GUNS

 ST. PAUL, Minn., Jan. 5 /PRNewswire/ -- Following simple preventive maintenance rules can prolong guns' and rifles' usable lifespan and save sportsmen hours of cleaning time and hundreds of dollars in repair and replacement costs, sporting goods dealers advise.
 Grime and rust are the primary culprits in firearms damage and malfunctions, according to Mark Wubben and Steve Manhood, employees of Burger Brothers Sporting Goods, Woodbury, Minn. Here are their tips to prevent trouble:
 1. Clean your equipment regularly, and never store it unless it's thoroughly clean. " ... the majority of gun problems you get are ones where guys just don't keep their guns clean," Wubben said.
 2. Don't overdo the oiling. Some sportsmen think that if a little cleaning oil is good, a lot must be better. However, excess oil can gum up in cold temperatures or drip into the action.
 3. Be careful when using oils that contain petroleum products, such as WD-40. These oils should be wiped dry to avoid gumming. They are not rust protectants, Manhood pointed out, and should not be used as such.
 4. Invest in rust protection. Two types of protectants are on the market:
 -- Solvents, which several companies make, cost from $1 to $10 and are applied after the firearms are cleaned;
 -- Sportsman's Rust Guard(TM), a new, no-work packet that combines 3M Oxidation Arrest Paper and a desiccant to absorb both moisture and airborne pollutants that cause rust. According to the manufacturer, Sportsman's Rust Guard protects metals for up to six months in a well- sealed cabinet or case. The cost is under $3 a packet. If the product is not available from local retailers, you can order it by calling Layton Marketing Group at 1-800-597-0227.
 5. Pay attention to humidity and dampness in deciding where to store your guns. Many firearms end up in basements and other areas where they're at risk from moisture damage. Also, cloth cases don't keep out all moisture, and once they get damp, they may retain moisture long enough to cause rust on the metals inside.
 -0- 1/5/93
 /CONTACT: Ted Engler or Scott Buerkle of The Layton Marketing Group, 1-800-597-0227/


CO: 3M; Burger Brothers Sporting Goods ST: Minnesota IN: LEI SU: PDT

AL -- MNFNS1 -- 1526 01/05/93 07:32 EST
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Date:Jan 5, 1993
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