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DATA ON ARBUTAMINE PRESENTED AT ACC

 SAN DIEGO, March 17 /PRNewswire/ -- Gensia Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: GNSA) announced today at the Scientific Sessions of the American College of Cardiology that Phase 2 clinical data on the use of arbutamine (a drug which is part of the GenESA(TM) System) to detect coronary artery disease showed that the pharmacological stress agent was as effective as exercise in provoking clinical, ECG and echocardiographic evidence of cardiac ischemia. In addition, data from a preclinical study indicated that arbutamine produced sufficient hemodynamic stress to be useful with radionuclide imaging in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease.
 The first ACC abstract, presented by Dr. L.E. Ginzton of Harbor-UCLA Medical Center Torrance, Calif., on behalf of the arbutamine study group, reports results from 45 patients enrolled in Phase 2 clinical trial of arbutamine in patients with confirmed coronary artery disease. The use of arbutamine was compared to exercise stress testing for the diagnosis of myocardial ischemia using ECG and echocardiography. With ECG, ischemia was detected in 60 percent of patients using arbutamine and 53 percent of patients with exercise testing. With echocardiography ischemia was detected in 88 percent of patients with arbutamine and 79 percent of patients with exercise testing. In this study, the data indicates that arbutamine is comparable to exercise stress testing in the detection of myocardial ischemia and the diagnosis of CAD when used with electrocardiography (ECG) or with echocardiography. In the study, there were no serious adverse events. This supports the previously presented data on the safety and tolerability of arbutamine.
 The second abstract, presented by Dr. A.J. Sinusas, describes a preclinical study performed at Yale University, New Haven, Conn., which found arbutamine useful in pharmacological stress with radionuclide imaging.
 "This clinical study provides further support of the safety and efficacy of arbutamine for use in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease," said David F. Hale, chairman, president and chief executive officer of Gensia. "In addition, the preclinical research on the use of arbutamine with radionuclide imaging supports its potential as a pharmacological stress agent with radionuclide imaging, a commonly used cardiac diagnostic technique."
 The GenESA System combines arbutamine and a computer-controlled drug administration system designed to pharmacologically stress the heart to aid in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. The GenESA System is currently being tested in multicenter Phase 3 clinical trials with three commonly used diagnostic techniques: ECG, echocardiography and radionuclide imaging. Patient enrollment in the ECG protocol of the Phase 3 clinical trials with the GenESA System was completed in December 1992. The enrollment in the protocol using the GenESA System with echocardiography was completed in March 1993, and the enrollment in the radionuclide imaging protocol is expected to be completed in the 2nd quarter of 1993. "Assuming positive results in these Phase 3 clinical trials, Gensia plans to make regulatory submissions in the U.S., Canada and Europe in the second half of 1993," according to Hale.
 The company believes that a primary clinical need for the GenESA System is for use with patients who are unable to undergo exercise stress tests or who have inconclusive exercise stress ECG tests. In addition, the GenESA System is also expected to enhance echocardiography, which is the fastest growing method of cardiac testing worldwide, and to enhance radionuclide imaging procedures.
 The company estimates that in the U.S., as many as 1.0 to 1.5 million patients who are candidates for testing for coronary artery disease are unable to exercise adequately due to physical disabilities or limitations. In addition, of the 6 million exercise stress ECG's performed each year in the U.S., approximately 20 percent to 30 percent of the tests are inconclusive, frequently because the patient is unable to achieve a sufficient increase in heart rate for diagnosis of coronary artery disease to be made. There are approximately 6 million echocardiography and 1.5 million radionuclide imaging procedures performed each year in the U.S.
 Gensia is a San Diego-based biopharmaceutical company formed to discover, develop, manufacture and market novel pharmaceutical products for the treatment and diagnosis of human diseases.
 -0- 3/17/93
 /CONTACT: Elizabeth A. Gard of Gensia Pharmaceuticals, 619-546-8300/
 (GNSA)


CO: Gensia Pharmaceuticals, Inc. ST: California IN: MTC SU:

BR -- NYON2 -- 6896 03/17/93 09:05 EST
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Date:Mar 17, 1993
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