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Cutting stroke risk.

Potassium and magnesium may help cut the risk of stroke.

Researchers tracked roughly 180,000 women in the Nurses' Health Study for 22 or 30 years. Those who averaged roughly 400 milligrams of magnesium a day had about a 10 percent lower risk of stroke than those who got roughly 230 mg a day. And women who averaged roughly 3,400 mg of potassium a day had about a 10 percent lower risk of stroke than those who got roughly 2,300 mg a day.

Calcium wasn't linked to a lower risk of stroke.

What to do: To get more magnesium, eat more leafy greens, beans, nuts, low-fat milk or yogurt, tofu, seafood, and whole grains. Fruits, vegetables, beans, seafood, milk, and yogurt are rich in potassium. A DASH or OmniHeart diet is rich in both (see March 2015, cover story).

Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 101: 1269, 2015.

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Title Annotation:QUICK STUDIES
Publication:Nutrition Action Healthletter
Article Type:Brief article
Date:Jul 1, 2015
Words:148
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