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Criminals to be hanged at dawn; AND A FEW VICTORIAN ... CROOKS AND IRON AGE FARMERS TOO PLEASE.

Byline: OWEN HUGHES

WANTED: Criminals to be hanged in a bid to attract more history loving tourists.

Victorian crooks, hangmen, judges and Iron Age farmers are also being sought by culture chiefs to bring history to life.

Actors will stage scenes at Beaumaris courthouse and gaol - well known for its brutal methods of keeping its prisoners in check and the scene of public hangings.

The Living History Group, which also hopes to stage re-enactments at Iron Age round houses at Melin Llynnon, Llanddeusant, hopes to cash in on the growth of heritage tourism. Auditions will start later this month.

A spokesman said all the roles were up for grabs. "The new scheme aims to boost tourism by capitalising on the island's rich history through the ages," said principal museums, culture and archives officer Pat West.

"This really would be volunteering with a difference.

It's a chance for our volunteers to learn more about our history, dress in period costumes and help bring history to life for those visiting our heritage sites."

The appeal for volunteers follows a successful drama project by Cwmni'r FranWen which boosted visitor numbers at both Beaumaris Courthouse and Llynnon Mill. Rural Tourism project officer Llio Huws said: "The drama project has already helped boost tourism, promote our attractions and bring history alive to visitors and local people alike.

"We now want to build on this success and are keen to hear from anyone interested in volunteering to become a part of this exciting project."

Pat added: "We're looking for volunteers to help with the performing, coordinating and behind the scenes roles and activities."

. Anyone wanting to take part should visit Beaumaris Gaol from 1.30pm-4.30pm on Saturday, November 27, call Pat West 01248 752009 or Llio Huws 01248 752453.

owen.hughes@dailypost.co.uk Beaumaris gaol: a brutal history . Beaumaris Gaol was built in 1829 and expanded in 1867 to accommodate around 30 inmates. The prison was known for its brutal methods, including stretching racks, chains and whippings. It has one of the last working treadmills in Britain - it pumped water for use in the cells. Only two hangings took place there: William Griffith in 1830 for the attempted murder of his first wife; Richard Rowlands in 1862 for murdering his father-in-law - he protested his innocence right up to the final moment - both were buried within the gaol walls in a lime pit. The only prisoner ever to escape was John Morris in 1859, using a rope. He broke his leg and was recaptured in the town. The gaol closed in 1877

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A 'prisoner' (right) waiting to be executed at Beaumaris gaol (above)
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Publication:Daily Post (Liverpool, England)
Date:Nov 19, 2010
Words:440
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