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Crackdown on health food stores? Where are our priorities?

In the December 1990 issue Sissy McGill related her experience of being imprisoned for six months, fined $10,000 and put on five years' probation for the crime of having made health claims about various natural products and herbs for dogs, cats and horses. She noted the FDA inspector who first came to her pet-related health food store said the FDA was also intent on going after anyone making similar claims for better human health.

A related article appeared in the August 9th, 1992 issue of the Dayton Daily News. It cited Texas health inspectors raiding health food stores earlier in the year and removing hundreds of products as illegal, including vitamin C, aloe vera products and herbal teas. It also cited that in Kent, Washington armed FDA agents burst into a clinic where practitioners of alternative medicine used injections of vitamins, minerals and amino acids to treat a variety of ailments. Those agents wore bullet-proof vests and commanded clinic employees to "freeze." The FDA said the clinic was raided because it made illegal drugs, including "vitamin-mineral concoctions."

Good Lord, what's next! Roadblocks looking for one-a-day vitamin and mineral supplements? Almost all of the U.S. is experiencing a significant rise in almost all categories of crime, with the majority of them related to the use of crack - and the government is going after health food stores?? It rather makes one wonder where our priorities lie.
COPYRIGHT 1993 Countryside Publications Ltd.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1993 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

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Author:Scharbok, Ken
Publication:Countryside & Small Stock Journal
Date:Jan 1, 1993
Words:236
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