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Counterculture New York.

FICTION

THE BUTTERFLY KID (1967)

By Chester Anderson

The place is Greenwich Village. The time is the late 1960s, or perhaps a science fiction future. The characters are hippies experimenting with psychedelic drugs that may or may not alter reality. The suppliers of the drugs are alien lobsters. If the book sounds too out there, rest assured that among the science fiction trappings is a vivid snapshot of a time and a place. Anderson lived the life he describes while writing the novel (well, maybe not the lobster part). This is the first book in the Greenwich Village Trilogy, followed by The Unicorn Girl by Michael Kurland, and The Probability Pad by T. A. Waters.

FIN & LADY (2013)

By Cathleen Schine

Schines's novel follows 11-year-old Fin and his half sister, 24-year-old Lady, as they transition from Connecticut (following the death of Fin's parents) to Greenwich Village. We follow Fin's coming-of-age-story and Lady's romantic adventures against the backdrop of the counterculture and the civil rights movement, as well as the escalation of the Vietnam War. Schine's richly observed story, both comedic and heartfelt, takes readers from the lighthearted hippie days to the arrival of "something menacing" as the late 1960s take a darker turn.

NONFICTION

A FREEWHEELIN' TIME

A Memoir of Greenwich Village in the Sixties (2007)

By Suze Rotolo

"I've always had trouble talking or reminiscing about the 1960s," Rotolo writes near the opening of her story. The author is most famous as the girl walking arm-in-arm with Bob Dylan on The Freewheelin Bob Dylan album cover. Here, we learn about the girl behind the image: her time as the daughter of Communist parents in Queens, her adoption of Greenwich Village (and vice versa), and her meeting 20-year-old Dylan when she was 17. The book is simultaneously autobiography, music history, and cultural document.

JOE GOULD'S SECRET (1993)

By Joseph Mitchell

In piecing together the life and death of Green-wich Village writer Joe Gould, Mitchell tells the story of underground New York-from the bohemians to the Beats. Gould lived an intention-ally downtrodden existence around the city while writing "An Oral History of Our Time"-that time being most of the first half of the 20th century. While the story ends in the late 1950s (right before the Mad Men era), we can see the seeds of what would become the counterculture planted in Mitchell's book.

FURTHER READING

Fiction

DIVINE RIGHT'S TRIP (1971) | GURNEY NORMAN

FRANNY AND ZOOEY (1961) | J. D. SALINGER

Nonfiction

THE VILLAGE: 400 YEARS OF BEATS AND BOHEMIANS, RADICALS AND ROGUES, A HISTORY OF GREENWICH VIL-LAGE (2013)| JOHN STRAUSBAUGH

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Title Annotation:A Freewheelin' Time: A Memoir of Greenwich Village in the Sixties; Fin and Lady; The Butterfly Kid
Publication:Bookmarks
Article Type:Book review
Date:Mar 1, 2014
Words:430
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