Printer Friendly

Cortisol levels predict neurocognitive impairment in OSA.

FROM SLEEP MEDICINE

Nocturnal cortisol levels explained up to 16% of changes in learning, memory, and working memory in patients with obstructive sleep apnea, a study showed.

But severity of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) did not predict neurocognitive impairment, said Dr. Kate M. Edwards of the University of Sydney, and her associates, who conducted the study at the University of California, San Diego.

"These findings suggest that OSA-related alterations in [hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal] activity may play a key role in the pathophysiology of neuropsychologic impairments in OSA," the investigators wrote (Sleep Med. 2014;15:27-32).

They enrolled 55 men and women with OSA and measured blood cortisol levels every 2 hours for 24 hours. The patients underwent polysomnography the next night and took a battery of tests to assess seven cognitive domains. The oxygen desaturation index (ODI) was used as an index of OSA severity.

In univariate analyses, the mean apnea-hypopnea index, ODI, and nighttime cortisol levels were significantly associated with global deficit scores and particularly with domains of learning, memory, and working memory, said the investigators. In hierarchical linear regression analyses, nighttime cortisol levels accounted for 9%-16% of variance in the three domains, while ODI (apnea) severity did not predict additional variance, they reported.

"Our data are in line with the literature reporting that chronic exposure to elevated physiologic cortisol levels is associated with a decline in neurocognitive function and hippocampal structure," the investigators said. "The functional effects of cortisol on reduced memory function have been demonstrated by experimental cortisol treatment and stress-induced cortisol level increases."

"The treatment of OSA with CPAP [continuous positive airway pressure] has been reported to show improvements in some aspects of neuropsychologic function, though findings are inconsistent," the investigators wrote.

"It may yield interesting data if future studies address the possibility that CPAP treatment effects on neurocognitive function are mediated by alterations in [hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal] function, specifically reductions in nighttime cortisol levels."

The University of California, San Diego, funded the work. The authors disclosed no conflicts.

BY AMY KARON

cpnews@frontlinemedcom.com

COPYRIGHT 2014 International Medical News Group
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2014 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:PSYCHOSOMATIC MEDICINE
Author:Karon, Amy
Publication:Clinical Psychiatry News
Date:Jun 1, 2014
Words:336
Previous Article:Orexin antagonist improves sleep in phase III studies.
Next Article:Sex, ancestry play roles in diabetes rates in Hispanics.
Topics:

Terms of use | Copyright © 2018 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters