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Cornered!

GREEN is the color of the Bryant defense's ambition!

Every basketball coach has to make his players understand all the nuances of the defense he wants them to play.

At Bryant College, we do a heavy selling job on our corner defense. We sell our players the idea that if they learn it and perform it correctly they will stop the other team from scoring a load against us.

The main objective of the corner defense is to force the ball into the Baseline corners. Any time we can do that, we will be able to substantially limit the opponents' options. We believe it is extremely difficult to run an offense with the ball being continually locked up in the corner.

The defense is predicated upon these simple rules:

1. Allow any pass that is headed toward the sideline and baseline.

2. Always force the ball to those areas.

3. Once the ball begins going to the sideline, never allow it to be redirected toward the middle.

4. Deny any pass toward the middle, including ball reversals.

5. Once the ball enters the corner, deny all passes out and front the post.

POINTERS:

We train our defense never to double-team the ball when it goes to the corner, as this will negate everything we have trained our defense to do. We would be encouraging the double-teamed ball-handler to get the ball back to the middle.

Another thing we do not do is help out our ball-defender in the corner. We want the ball-handler in the corner to shoot it. Very few shooters are going to hurt us from there.

The sideline and the baseline are the only help an intelligent corner defensive man should need.

To help our players understand the corner defense, we break down the front court by color - yellow, green, and red.

Any part of the floor within eight feet of the basket is the red area. Any time an attacker enters this area, we completely deny him the ball and try to force him out of the area immediately.

We believe the best way to stop a team from scoring in the post is by denying them the ball, and the best way of doing that is by fronting anyone on the inside.

In fronting the post, we expect our defender to get a lot of help from the opposite forward and, of course, the defender.

The area outside of the red and the corners is called the yellow area. Any time the ball enters this area, we want our defenders to force it toward one of the green areas (corners) as soon as possible.

We never want to give the offense any options with the ball. We always want to pressure the ball and make the offense believe its best option is to put the ball in the corner.

We want to keep the ball in the green as much as possible. Whenever the ball goes that way, our defender must yell "Green!" to alert the other defenders to the need of denying any pass out of it.

We keep track of how many times the ball enters the green areas. We believe that if we can force the offense into the green on a third of its possessions, we should win the game.

The corner defense is easy to learn and extremely effective whenever it's played right.

What we are doing, in effect, is motivating our defenders to force the ball into bad shooting position.

Chad O'Donnell Asst. Basketball Coach, Bryant College (ME)
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Title Annotation:basketball defense
Author:O'Donnell, Chad
Publication:Coach and Athletic Director
Date:Jan 1, 1996
Words:589
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