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Company Watch August 2005.

Katrina forces airlines to cancel flights; airports halt operations. Several airports stopped operating Monday, and airlines canceled flights as Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast. The storm also caused a spike in oil prices, which could push costs up for the airlines. United Airlines, American Airlines and Continental Airlines were among the carriers canceling flights. Airlines expect delays and cancellations related to the storm to continue through the week. Aug 30, 2005

Hurricane may send airline fuel prices soaring: Hurricane Katrina could push fuel costs higher for the airlines, analysts say. Airlines do not yet know how high prices will climb. "Jet-fuel prices are crushing, and could prove to be a knock-out blow for some," said John Heimlich of the Air Transport Association, in a recent report on fuel prices.

Aug 30, 2005

Storm may stall jet fuel deliveries: Airports and airlines are concerned that Hurricane Katrina might interrupt or delay deliveries of jet fuel. Oil refineries were shut down ahead of the storm, and analysts say

it could be weeks before some reopen. Air Transport Association spokeswoman Victoria Day said it is too soon to tell how the jet fuel supply will be affected, but she noted that the impact will be negative. Aug 30, 2005

France proposes airline tax to fight global poverty. French President Jacques Chirac said France will tax airlines starting next year and use the proceeds to fight global poverty. France chose airline tickets to tax in part because airlines benefit from globalization and paid low tax rates. The International Air Transport Association has criticized the proposal. Several countries are still debating the idea, and France is launching the pilot program to prove the idea can work. Aug 30, 2005

Hurricane cuts jet fuel supply 13%; fuel shipped to airports. Some airports ran low on jet fuel and airlines canceled hundreds of flights in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. The storm damaged refineries on the Gulf Coast and cut the supply of jet fuel in the U.S. by 13%, according to the Air Transport Association. Jet fuel is being shipped by air tanker to airports in Charlotte, N.C., Fort Myers, Fla., and West Palm Beach, Fla. Some analysts say the fuel shortage could push some carriers into bankruptcy. Aug 30, 2005

Wright Amendment stifles airline industry: The Wright Amendment is one example of how government is too protective of the airline industry, according to this Los Angeles Times editorial. Wright, which limits flying out of Dallas Love Field, costs California millions in lost economic activity each year, according to the editorial. The government has also hurt the industry by allowing bankrupt carriers to continue to operate without paying their bills. Aug 29, 2005

Lenders offer bankrupt United Airlines $3B in financing. Four banks have offered to provide $3 billion in financing to United Airlines, the carrier said. The financing would help the airline exit bankruptcy by early 2006. The lenders had offered to provide $2.5 billion to United. The increase reflects updates to United's business plan, which now includes more labor-cost cuts. Aug 26, 2005

The battle for Europe's low-fare flyers. Europe's low-cost airlines have grown at a tremendous rate in recent years as attractive ticket prices incited more people to fly. Now, however, many of the Continent's main markets are becoming saturated, and competition is heating up among low-cost rivals, charter carriers, and traditional airlines. Low-cost airlines must trim costs as well as find new sources of revenue to ensure continued growth and to survive a coming period of consolidation. Traditional carriers must also lower costs, but to hang on to their lucrative business customers they must ensure that higher ticket prices correspond to significantly better service than the economy-class. Aug 24, 2005

Soaring oil could push large carrier out of business, report says. Soaring oil prices could eventually send one of the large airlines out of business or force the industry to restructure itself, writes The Wall Street Journal's Scott McCartney. The effect of oil prices, which recently topped more than $67 a barrel, may get worse after the Labor Day holiday, when passenger traffic typically declines. Aug 23, 2005

Airlines will pay less for insurance this year, observers say. Aviation insurance premiums are expected to decline this year because the U.S. commercial aviation industry has experienced one of its safest periods in history. The industry has not recorded a major accident since late 2001, when an American Airlines flight crashed in New York. Recent crashes in Toronto, Greece and Venezuela will not boost rates for U.S. carriers, one observer said. Aug 23, 2005

Labor relations shift for airlines, unions. Extended labor disputes are occurring less frequently in the airline industry, industry observers say. The industry experienced just four strikes in the past 10 years, compared with 33 strikes between 1976 and 1985. The change reflects shrinking union membership, the political prominence of Republicans, and financial instability within the airline business. Aug 22, 2005

Soaring oil prices stall airline recovery. Record oil prices are preventing U.S. airlines from recovering from a financial slump. Most U.S. airlines continue to post large losses despite cuts in labor costs and an improvement in the U.S. economy. The cost of jet fuel has doubled in some markets. Legacy airlines face stiff competition from discounters and are reluctant to pass all of the increase on to consumers. Aug 18, 2005

Government should change approach to airline industry. The federal government should reform the way it regulates the airline industry, writes Paul J. Gessing, director of government affairs for the National Taxpayers Union. He cites United Airlines' decision to turn $9.8 billion in pension obligations over to the government's Pension Benefit Guarantee Corp. Additionally, the government should allow a private company to manage air traffic control services, he writes. Aug 16, 2005

Catering firm also faces trouble in U.S.. Problems surrounding catering firm Gate Gourmet are not isolated to the U.K. Gate Gourmet, based in Reston, Va., and Zurich, is involved in labor disputes in the U.S. as it tries to cut $42 million in annual costs. Thousands of travelers were stranded at London's Heathrow Airport last week when airline workers walked off the job in sympathy with Gate Gourmet employees. Negotiations between the company and unions resumed Monday. Aug 16, 2005

Oil prices touch new record at $66.11 a barrel. Oil prices reached a new record of $66.11 a barrel Friday. Some energy brokers expect prices to climb higher as suppliers struggle to meet the surging demand for oil created by the U.S. economy. Aug 15, 2005

Airlines lift prices to combat higher fuel costs: Most major airlines lifted fares over the weekend by up to $10 on one-way tickets. The carriers hope higher ticket prices will help ease the burden of soaring fuel prices. Oil prices touched a record high last week. Aug 15, 2005

Fuel costs erode profits. Despite more passengers taking to the air and flying more miles on average, the high cost of jet fuel contributed to a $3 billion net loss for airlines in the year's first quarter, said Jim Corridore, airline equity analyst at Standard & Poor's. Fuel prices stand at an all-time high of $1.43 a gallon, 75% higher than 2000 and 36% higher than 1981, the previous peak. Aug 12, 2005

Some airports feeling squeeze of jet-fuel shortages. Sharp spikes in jet-fuel prices recently sent airports in Arizona, California, Florida and Nevada scrambling to ferry in fuel from other markets and locations, which experts say is a short-term fix for an underlying problem. Aviation travel has increased beyond Sept. 11, 2001, levels, and the industry is outgrowing the infrastructure that supports it. Glenn Hipp, Southwest Airlines' director of fuel purchasing and inventory management, said late July and early August were "unprecedented for Southwest for the number of cities where we've had to manage supply problems." Aug 11, 2005

Government lawyers: Connecting passengers don't enjoy constitutional protection. The U.S. government is defending its actions in a case where it detained a Canadian passenger making a connecting flight in a U.S. airport and then later deported him to Syria so he could be tortured. Government lawyers argued such passengers are outside the protection of the U.S. Constitution because anyone presenting a foreign passport in order to make a connecting flight on U.S. soil is technically seeking admission to the U.S. and may be denied such admission, along with the protection afforded them under the Constitution. Aug 10, 2005

Avoiding plane repossession, judge allows United to buy debt. United Airlines avoided a possible repossession of 14 of its aircraft, gaining approval from bankruptcy court Monday to buy $293 million in senior debt. The company will now be able to refinance its debt on the airplanes and lower its payments in an effort to restructure the jet leases. Aug 9, 2005

Jet fuel prices surpass crude oil. Refiners are using tight fuel supplies and soaring crude-oil prices to increase their margins earned from turning oil into jet fuel, for which airlines are having trouble paying the price. The widening gap between crude oil and jet fuel has more than quadrupled to $11 per barrel so far this year compared to the $2.59 per barrel average in 2002. Aug 9, 2005

Airlines recover service since attacks, but gains are uneven. The airline industry has staged an uneven recovery from the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, according to an analysis by USA TODAY. The South has fared best in regaining service since the attacks, and the Midwest is down the most. The study also found that while the amount of air service is catching up to pre-Sept. 11 levels, the number of seats still lag behind. Aug 2, 2005

Distribution systems still in transition from deregulation. Rules that required global distribution systems to give airlines the same prices for the same services expired a year ago today. The distribution systems, including Sabre, still have not felt the full effect of the new rules. One Sabre executive said the company is continuing "our transition from passive distributor of travel products to an active retailer." Aug 1, 2005

Airlines get creative to reduce fuel costs. Airline managers are working diligently to reduce the amount of fuel jetliners use. Some airlines are washing planes more often to cut the amount of friction in flight. Others are scaling back on the number of newspapers and magazines in the cabin and fitting planes with lighter catering equipment. High fuel costs are partly responsible for industry's financial slump. Air Transport Association Chief Executive James May recently told Congress the industry "cannot achieve a sustained profit" with oil trading at record prices. Aug 1, 2005

Feds agree to mediate AirTran's pilot contract talks. The National Mediation Board has agreed to mediate talks between AirTran Airways and its pilots union, the union said. AirTran has said it believes mediation would complicate the contract talks. The company and union began talks in December 2004. Aug 1, 2005

Air China, China Eastern Airlines, China Southern

China has further opened up its tightly controlled aviation sector to foreign investment, in the hope of winning more funding amid booming demand for air travel. China is seeking private capital to join in areas such as cargo, airport construction, jet fuel sales, aircraft maintenance, catering and computer-based air-ticketing systems. However, investors cannot take majority stakes in the country's three largest airlines, Air China, China Eastern Airlines and China Southern Airlines. http://www.airchina.com.cn Aug 5, 2005

Airbus

U.S. says U.K. aid to Airbus could undermine subsidy talks. The White House said negotiations to end a dispute over aircraft subsidies could be hurt if the U.K. gives Airbus financial help to develop the A350. Airbus wants $680 million from the U.K. to launch the jet, according to media reports. The U.S. believes Airbus receives unfair government subsidies to develop its planes, but Airbus counters that U.S.-based Boeing receives subsidies in the form of defense contracts. Both sides have filed complaints with the World Trade Organization. Aug 25, 2005

Airbus

Airbus names new CEO of North America. European jetmaker Airbus named Barry Eccleston president and chief executive officer of Airbus North America Holdings. Eccleston previously was a vice president at Honeywell. He will oversee Airbus in the U.S. and Canada, including sales and marketing, and service and training. Eccleston replaces Henri Courpron, who was named executive vice president of procurement. Aug 2, 2005

Airbus, Boeing

U.S. will ask WTO to appoint panel to decide subsidy case. After months of talks with European Union officials, the U.S. said it will take its aircraft subsidy case to the World Trade Organization. The U.S. Friday will ask the WTO to appoint a panel to decide the case. The U.S. believes European jetmaker Airbus receives unfair state subsidies to develop planes. Airbus counters that U.S. jetmaker Boeing receives subsidies in the form of defense contracts. The case could take two years or longer to resolve. Aug 19, 2005

Airbus, Irkut

Russian firm to help Airbus develop proposed A350. Russian firm Irkut will participate in the design and manufacture of the proposed Airbus A350 jetliner. The company has signed a letter of intent with Airbus. It specifies that Airbus and Irkut "will explore opportunities in research and technology that could further enhance Russia's contribution to future Airbus aircraft programs." Aug 18, 2005

America West

America West chief says fuel prices make merger more urgent. Higher fuel prices make the need for a merger more important, said America West Airlines Chief Executive Officer Doug Parker. America West plans to merge with US Airways. The airlines announced the agreement in May when oil prices were about $50 a barrel. Oil prices are now around $70 a barrel. Parker said the merger will help the airlines endure higher fuel prices. "We're stronger together than we are apart," he said. Aug 30, 2005

America West

America West, US Airways merger vote scheduled. The merger between America West Airlines and US Airways is moving forward, with a shareholder meeting date set and a new stock symbol unveiled. In a securities filing on Monday, the companies said America West shareholders will vote on the deal Sept. 13. US Airways has been operating under Chapter 11 since last fall, and the merger with America West plays a big part in their reorganization plan. Aug 9, 2005

America West Airlines

Merged airline will keep Charlotte hub, America West says. America West Airlines Executive Vice President Scott Kirby will lead the merger of his airline and US Airways. In an interview with The Charlotte Observer, Kirby said Charlotte will remain a major hub for the combined airline. He said the combined carrier will have lower costs than most legacy airlines. Long-term challenges of the merger include combining corporate cultures, Kirby said. Aug 2, 2005

America West, US Airways

Merged airline will manage higher fuel prices. America West Airlines executives had said the merger of America West and US Airways would be profitable even if oil prices rose to $50 a barrel. With the price of oil now above $60 a barrel, America West Chairman and CEO Doug Parker said he hopes the new airline can manage the higher fuel costs by raising prices. However, he noted "that has not been the case thus far for America West or any other airline." Aug 4, 2005

American Airlines

American's fuel program saves $110M in 18 months: American Airlines had dedicated a group of employees to coming up with ideas on how to cut fuel expenses. So far, the company's "Fuel Smart" program has saved it $110 million. One strategy developed through the program includes asking passengers to pull down window shades and open air vents to keep the cabin cool between flights. Aug 31, 2005

American Airlines

American adopts new formula for executive compensation. American Airlines has chosen a complex way to compensate its top leaders, tying a large part of their bonuses to the airline's performance. The new formula could eventually mean a big pay raise for American Chief Executive Officer Gerard Arpey, who last year earned $518,837. Aug 4, 2005

American Airlines, Southwest Airlines

Airlines make political contributions as Wright debate persists. Southwest Airlines and American Airlines have donated money to state and national lawmakers and political action committees as the debate over the Wright Amendment escalates. Both carriers played down the controversy over Wright and instead said the contributions are an attempt to build long-term relationships with lawmakers. Wright restricts flying out of Love Field in Dallas where Southwest operates a large hub. Southwest wants the law lifted; American argues it should remain. Aug 29, 2005

Asiana

Korea seems to have settled down after pilot union troubles lasting nearly one month. With a strike deadline only hours away Korean Air has came to an agreement with its pilots resulting in a new agreement concerning retirement age and rest periods. The airline is operating as normal. Asiana, the country's second largest carrier whose industrial problems started towards the end of July, is now beginning to organise a full schedule of flights, on strike pilots only returning to work after government intervention. http://www.koreanair.com http://us.flyasiana.com Aug 19, 2005

ATA Airlines

ATA Airlines receives extension for reorganization plan. The bankruptcy court overseeing ATA Airlines case extended the airline's sole right to file a reorganization plan to Sept. 30 and its right to lobby creditors to Nov. 30. The airline filed for bankruptcy in October, but said it has not filed its plan because of the size and complexity of the case. Aug 25, 2005

ATA Airlines

ATA Airlines CEO Mikelsons to retire this month. The founder and chief executive of bankrupt ATA Airlines said he will retire from the company at the end of the month. J. George Mikelsons, 67, said he is leaving "to enjoy retirement." John G. Denison will take over as chief executive, company officials said. Aug 15, 2005

Boeing

Boeing makes offer to machinists; union says sides "far apart". Boeing revised its contract offer to its machinists union and boosted the workers' cash bonuses. But a spokeswoman for the union said the sides are far apart on pension, health care and job security. The union's contract expires Friday, and leaders have warned of a possible strike. Boeing will make its final offer today under a negotiating timetable set by the two sides. Aug 30, 2005

Boeing

Machinists say Boeing's revised offer falls short. Boeing's machinists union said the company's revised contract offer falls short of the union's goals for job security, pension programs and health care. Less than one week remains before the current contract expires. Boeing said the current offer would provide one of the best compensation packages in the industry. Aug 29, 2005

Boeing

Machinists call Boeing's pension offer a "meager increase". The union representing Boeing machinists said the company has offered a "very meager increase on pensions." The pension issue remains a sticking point in ongoing contract talks, the union said. Boeing and the union would not comment specifically on pension figures. On Thursday, the mechanics delivered a counteroffer to Boeing's proposal. Boeing has said it will make its last offer Tuesday, and workers will vote Thursday. Aug 26, 2005

Boeing

Boeing machinists union criticizes company's first offer. Boeing's machinists union told workers the company's first complete proposal "fell well short of all your top issues." The union is seeking more job security and improved pension benefits for the workers. Boeing called the offer "balanced and competitive" on its Web site and declined to comment on the union's remarks. The two sides are continuing negotiations.

Aug 25, 2005

Boeing

Boeing, machinists union continue talks. Boeing and the union representing its machinists continue to negotiate and exchange contract proposals. Boeing has said it will make its final offer Tuesday, but a union representative said the company may make the offer as early as Sunday. Neither side is releasing details about the talks. Aug 24, 2005

Boeing

Talks continue between Boeing and its machinists. Negotiators for Boeing and its machinists union have said little about the progress of contract talks. The union on Sunday held a rally outside of the building where the talks are taking place. Boeing will make its final offer to the union Aug. 30, and workers will vote on the contract Sept. 1. The union wants to boost the workers' pension plan. Health benefits and job security are also important issues for the workers, representatives said. Aug 22, 2005

Boeing

Boeing, machinists resume contract talks. Boeing and negotiators for its machinists union will resume contract talks today. The sides have said little since negotiations officially started in June. Union leaders submitted their first offer to Boeing in June and are waiting for a written counteroffer. Aug 15, 2005

Boeing

Boeing, machinists enter round-the-clock contract talks. Boeing and its largest union, the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers, will enter the final stage of contract talks over issues such as pensions, health care and job security. Boeing is expected to make its final offer Aug. 30, which will give union members a couple of days to look the contract over before voting on it Sept. 1. Aug 12, 2005

Boeing

Boeing raises price of jets by 3.5%. Boeing announced it has updated prices for its jets, increasing the list cost by an average of about 3.5%. But the new prices have been called a "starting point," as the airplane manufacturer often gives steep discounts to its customers. Boeing said its new price list "reflects an increase by airplane submodel, which is consistent with the general inflation rate for manufactured goods." Aug 5, 2005

British Airways

British Airways flights grind to a halt amid catering dispute. A walkout yesterday by employees of Gate Gourmet, the company that provides catering for British Airways, has escalated to include the airline's baggage handlers and check-in personnel. More than 100 BA flights in and out of London's Heathrow Airport have been canceled so far, affecting about 70,000 passengers. Aug 12, 2005

British Airways

British Airways reported a pre-tax profit of [pounds sterling]124m (2004: [pounds sterling]75m profit), for the first quarter to 30 June 2005, a rise of [pounds sterling]49m on the same period last year. The operating profit for the first quarter was [pounds sterling]176m. CEO Sir Rod Eddington said they were good results, despite a 37.6% increase in fuel costs. More customers flying in our premium cabins drive the improvement in passenger revenue. BA added that record passenger loads in July indicate that the short term impact of the London bombings was not material, although it is too early to say what the long term impact will be. http://www.britishairways.com Aug 5, 2005

British Airways, Gate Gourmet

Strike's aftereffects at Heathrow continue over weekend. The aftermath of a strike last week continued to disrupt British Airways operations and left thousands of travelers stranded at Heathrow Airport over the weekend. British Airways workers walked off the job in support of employees at caterer Gate Gourmet. The strike ended Friday, and talks between the company and the union representing the workers resumed Sunday. The airline resumed all scheduled flights today. Aug 15, 2005

Delta Air Lines

Delta Air Lines pilots name new union chairman. The Delta Air Lines pilots union elected Lee Moak chairman of its Master Executive Council. Moak is a Boeing 737 captain based in Atlanta. Moak will take office Oct. 1 and will replace John Malone. Delta is trying to avoid filing for bankruptcy protection, and some analysts think the airline will ask the pilots union for more concessions. Last year, the pilots agreed to give up $1 billion in pay and benefits. Aug 29, 2005

Delta Air Lines

Bankruptcy would not shut down Delta operations: Delta Air Lines may file for bankruptcy as early as next month, but will likely continue to fly, analysts say. Most airlines continue to operate after they file for bankruptcy protection, and Delta may have to cut back on some of its scheduled flights, according to observers. Aug 29, 2005

Delta Air Lines

Delta Air Lines may not make it alone, some analysts say. Some analysts are questioning whether Delta Air Lines can survive as an independent carrier. The airline's executives are now weighing whether to sell assets to keep it afloat or to file for bankruptcy protection. High oil prices continue to hurt the carrier, and some analysts say it is the weakest of the large airlines because it doesn't offer extensive international service. A Delta spokesman said the carrier is considering all of its options, noting "In or out of court, we have a plan." Aug 24, 2005

Delta Air Lines

Delta warns pilots union of low cash levels. Delta Air Lines has told its pilots union that cash levels are so low it may ask for additional concessions. The pilots last fall agreed to $1 billion in pay and benefit cuts. The agreement stipulated the airline would not seek additional cuts unless cash levels fell to a certain level for two months in a row. A Delta spokesman said the company has not proposed amending the pilots' contract. Aug 22, 2005

Delta Air Lines

S&P may lower Delta Air Lines debt rating. Higher fuel prices, concerns about a bankruptcy filing and limited cash holdings may push Standard & Poor's to lower Delta Air Lines' debt rating. Delta's shares have dropped 78% this year. Standard & Poor's will remove the stock from its 500 index after trading ends Thursday. Aug 17, 2005

Delta Air Lines

Delta to sell regional unit to SkyWest for $425M. Delta Air Lines said it will sell its Atlantic Southeast regional subsidiary to SkyWest for $425 million, the company said in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Delta also said the sale will not provide the cash reserve it needs to secure a new agreement allowing it to continue accepting credit cards from Visa International and MasterCard International. The SEC filing indicated Delta may soon file for bankruptcy protection. Aug 16, 2005

Delta Air Lines

Delta discusses possible bankruptcy financing with lenders. Delta Air Lines is talking with creditors and exploring ways to finance a bankruptcy filing, The New York Times reported, citing unnamed sources. The company is in talks with lenders that have provided funds for restructuring in the past. Delta may also sell or refinance its two commuter airlines. The company may choose to file for bankruptcy before Oct. 17, when a new bankruptcy law goes into effect. Aug 15, 2005

Delta Air Lines

Delta pilots contemplate further concessions. Delta Air Lines' pilots may try to help the struggling airline avoid bankruptcy by accepting another pay cut. The pilots negotiated pay and benefit cuts last year to the tune of $5 billion, but Delta, which has seen numerous executives depart in recent weeks, still faces serious financial woes. Aug 10, 2005

Delta Air Lines

Delta reveals credit card uncertainty: Negotiations with a credit card processing company has caused Delta Air Lines to delay the filing of its second-quarter results. The airline, which many analysts speculate is headed for bankruptcy, stands to lose customers if a deal is not reached that allows it to continue taking payments from travelers using Visa or Mastercard. Aug 10, 2005

Delta Air Lines

Delta Air Lines is likely to file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection later this year, just before more restrictive bankruptcy laws go into effect, according to news reports from the US. That could mean declaring bankruptcy in mid-September. Delta CEO Gerald Grinstein told employees the airline's effort to cut $5bn might not be enough to ensure its survival. The airline was preparing to file for bankruptcy last October when its pilots agreed to wage and benefit cuts. http://www.delta.com Aug 5, 2005

Delta Air Lines

Delta in talks to sublease space in Logan terminal. Delta Air Lines is in talks with carriers interested in subleasing space at its new terminal at Boston's Logan International Airport. The new terminal opened five months ago. The airline may soon file for bankruptcy, according to media reports. It built more space than it needed at Logan in case it eventually needed to expand. Aug 3, 2005

Delta Air Lines

Some analysts stay bullish on airline stocks despite fuel prices. Some Wall Street analysts continue to recommend airline stocks even though record fuel prices may prolong the industry's slump into the fall. One analyst recommends American Airlines because the carrier has successfully cut costs. Another analyst says he expects Delta Air Lines to avoid bankruptcy this year and maintains an overweight rating on the airline's shares. Aug 1, 2005

Delta Air Lines

Some observers see Delta filing for bankruptcy this fall. High pension payments and fuel prices may push Delta Air Lines into bankruptcy this fall, according to one media report. Some observers say the carrier will file after the busy travel season and before stricter bankruptcy laws become effective on Oct. 17. Chief Executive Gerald Grinstein has said the outcome of pending pension reform bills will influence whether the airline files for bankruptcy. Aug 1, 2005

Delta Air Lines, SkyTeam

Delta Air Lines still sees antitrust approval for SkyTeam members. Delta Air Lines believes members of its SkyTeam alliance will receive antitrust approval, despite objections by the Department of Justice. The agency has recommended against antitrust approval for Delta, Northwest Airlines and four European SkyTeam members. The Justice Department said allowing the airlines to coordinate flights and pricing would hurt competition. A Delta spokesman said the airline is "confident" that the Department of Transportation will approve the application. Aug 26, 2005

Delta Air Lines, Southwest Airlines

Carriers will ask Utah for tax cuts next month. Large airlines that fly to Salt Lake City will ask the state of Utah for more tax cuts next month. Representatives for Delta Air Lines, Southwest Airlines and other carriers will testify before Utah's Tax Reform Task Force. The airlines and the task force will try to decide if further tax cuts could help the industry. Aug 5, 2005

Delta Air Lines, United Airlines

As oil costs increase, several airlines raise ticket prices. As a result of rising fuel costs, airlines resumed their fare increases as Delta Air Lines raised tickets by up to $20 round-trip in most domestic markets and United Airlines boosted similar trips by up to $10, followed by US Airways. Continental Airlines matched Delta's price hike, which included lower increases of $3 to $5 each way. Travel analyst Terry Trippler predicted the latest fare boost would hold. "When we have oil at $65 a barrel, it's got to happen," Trippler said. Aug 12, 2005

Independence Air

Independence Air reports Q2 loss, warns of possible bankruptcy. While reporting second-quarter losses of $98 million -- more than triple the amount of a year ago -- Independence Air issued a warning that it may soon file for bankruptcy. The carrier hopes to borrow money in order to stay afloat, but Chief Executive Officer Kerry Skeen explained such an approach might not be easy. "We can't provide assurances that our efforts will be successful. We realize there are tough times ahead," Skeen said. Aug 10, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Northwest's traffic stays steady as strike drags on. The mechanics' strike at Northwest Airlines will enter its 12th day Wednesday. So far, the airline has not experienced a sizable decline in customer traffic. Other unions at Northwest Airlines are not honoring the picket line. The striking Aircraft Mechanics Fraternal Association is not part of the AFL-CIO, the large labor federation. AFL-CIO unions would be more likely to honor a strike by other members. Aug 31, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Head of Northwest mechanics union rallies workers. The director of the mechanics union at Northwest Airlines visited the picket lines Monday with hopes of boosting the strikers' spirits. Other unionized employees are not honoring the picket line, and some mechanics say the union rushed into the strike. No new talks are scheduled with the airline. Northwest is trying to avoid filing for bankruptcy protection and is seeking $1.1 billion in cuts from its work force. The airline today will start negotiations with its flight attendants union and will meet Wednesday with pilots. Aug 30, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Northwest's aging jets complicate financial troubles: Northwest Airlines' aging jetliners are creating more financial trouble for the airline as it endures a mechanics strike. Older jetliners are just as safe as new planes when they are well-maintained, but they use more fuel and are less efficient then newer models. Oil prices recently surged to around $70 a barrel. Northwest's planes are an average of 18.2 years old, the oldest average age among major U.S. carriers. Its oldest jets are almost 40 years old. Aug 30, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Northwest says strike causes few disruptions. Northwest Airlines said an ongoing mechanics strike caused few service disruptions over the weekend. The company's mechanics have been on strike since Aug. 20. Some members of the mechanics union are questioning the union's decision to call a strike before members were allowed to vote on the company's contract offer. Union leaders said members would have rejected the contract if they had the chance to vote on it. Meanwhile, the airline's pilots union is preparing for another round of talks with the company, which is seeking more than $300 million in concessions. Aug 29, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Airlines' rocky finances make unions reluctant to strike. Airline unions have lost clout as the companies continue to struggle financially, some observers say. Replacement workers have allowed Northwest Airlines to continue to operate more than 95% of its flights, and its pilots and flight attendants have reported for work. Experts say unions now realize prolonged strikes could put their companies out of business. Aug 26, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Northwest executive "happy" with operations. A Northwest Airlines executive said the airline has recovered from delays caused by a mechanics strike. "We are very, very happy with where we sit right now from an operational performance," said Andy Roberts, Northwest's executive vice president of operations. "We believe we are back in the normal bounds of what we'd expect to see." However, the head of the company's pilots union said operations are only "acceptable." Northwest also said it may consider permanently hiring workers who are replacing the striking mechanics. No talks are scheduled with the mechanics union. Aug 26, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Northwest faces problems beyond mechanics' strike: Steep competition, high fuel prices and looming pension payments persist at Northwest Airlines. Additionally, Northwest may face a $276 million payment to two unions for failing to redeem preferred stock issued to them in return for concessions. Some analysts believe the carrier can avoid filing for bankruptcy if it continues to operate well during the strike. Aug 26, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Northwest to operate "indefinitely" with replacement workers. Northwest Airlines said it is prepared to operate "indefinitely" with a work force of replacement mechanics. The company's mechanics went on strike Saturday after contract talks broke down. Some Northwest travelers said operations appear to be normal, but the union representing the striking mechanics says cancellations are increasing. Northwest would not comment Wednesday about the number of canceled or delayed flights. Analysts say Northwest will survive the strike if it can convince the public safety standards and on-time performance have not changed. Aug 25, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Northwest faces higher cancellation rate as strike continues. Northwest Airlines said a mechanics strike forced it to cancel more flights than usual on Monday. The airline's cancellation rate Monday was triple what it was a year ago. The airline expects to operate 96% of its scheduled flights this week. The union representing the workers disputed the carrier's numbers, adding "Northwest is attempting to paint a much better picture than exists." Aug 24, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Northwest continues operations as it weathers strike. Northwest Airlines said operations were "normal" three days into a mechanics strike. However, some travelers reported delayed and canceled flights, and the mechanics union says delays were more extensive than the airline admitted. A Northwest spokesman said the airline is affected by the strike, but added replacement workers are clearing the backlog of maintenance work. Talks between workers and the company have not resumed since the strike started. Aug 23, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Northwest mechanics receive little support from other unions: Striking mechanics at Northwest Airlines are not receiving much support from the carrier's pilots and flight attendants. The Aircraft Mechanics Fraternal Association, which represents the mechanics, is known as an outsider in the labor movement and has grown by winning members away from other unions, observers say. The result of the Northwest strike could have broader effects on the industry and its unions, labor experts say. Aug 23, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Airline pension reform remains uncertain. Delta Air Lines and Northwest Airlines have lobbied lawmakers for more time to fund their pension plans. However, it is unclear if Congress will pass pension reform laws. A bill that would give airlines 14 years to fund their plans will soon head to the Senate floor. A different bill that would require funding within seven years must go before the House Ways and Means Committee before it lands on the House floor. Northwest and Delta had asked that their obligations be spread over 25 years. Aug 23, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Northwest mechanics strike; airline says weekend was "normal". Northwest Airlines mechanics walked off the job early Saturday morning. The airline hired replacement workers and continued to fly. It described weekend operations as "normal." Union officials said the airline experienced more delays and cancellations. The airline, which is struggling to avoid filing for bankruptcy protection, said it needs $176 million in annual pay and benefit cuts from the workers. The sides have not scheduled new talks. Aug 22, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Maintenance outsourcing surges; unions raise safety concerns. Airlines are increasingly outsourcing maintenance work to lower their costs. Outsourcing was a key issue in talks between Northwest Airlines and its mechanics union, which went on strike Saturday morning. Unions representing airline workers say outsourcing raises safety concerns. Sarah MacLeod, executive director of Aeronautical Repair Station Association, said contractors' standards are as safe as those of the airlines. Aug 22, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Northwest makes new offer as deadline approaches. Northwest Airlines made what it called its "last and best" offer to its mechanics union Thursday. The workers may legally strike Saturday morning if the two sides have not reached an agreement. Northwest said it has hired replacement workers and plans to fly through the possible strike. Negotiations will continue today, the company and union said. The airline is seeking $176 million in annual cuts from the mechanics. Aug 19, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Northwest may face mechanics strike on Saturday. Northwest Airlines could face a strike as early as Saturday morning if it does not reach a contract agreement with its mechanics union. The two sides say they are not close to reaching an agreement. Northwest, which is trying to avoid a bankruptcy filing, wants to reduce costs related to the mechanics by $176 million a year. The union says the carrier's demands would eliminate half of the mechanic jobs. Other airlines have asked workers groups for pay and benefit cuts, and none of the negotiations have resulted in a strike. Aug 18, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Bush will not stop possible Northwest strike. President George W. Bush will not help Northwest Airlines avert a possible strike by mechanics later this week, the White House said. The president has the authority to appoint a special board that would put a strike or a lockout by the company on hold. Aug 16, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Airline must adapt to changes. Northwest Airlines will still face several challenges even if it avoids a strike by its mechanics union. The company must adapt to record high oil prices, repay lenders, fund its pension plan and fend off steep competition from discount carriers. Chief Executive Officer Doug Steenland acknowledged Northwest "has no choice" but to change with the industry. Some observers say the airline may file for Chapter 11 before bankruptcy laws change in mid-October. Aug 15, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Northwest, union return to talks: Talks between Northwest Airlines and its mechanics union are expected to resume today in Washington. If the two sides do not reach an agreement, the workers may legally strike at the end of the week. Aug 15, 2005

Northwest Airlines

"Business as usual" for Northwest if mechanics walk off job. With the Aug. 19 strike deadline for the Aircraft Mechanics Fraternal Association looming, Northwest Airlines promises to keep the carrier on target, covering 100% of its schedule with trained and qualified replacement mechanics, additional maintenance vendors and extra flight attendants should workers refuse to cross the picket line. "We don't anticipate any disruption in travel plans," said Tim Griffin, executive vice president of marketing and distribution. "If there is a [flight] irregularity, we'll handle it just like we handle it now. It'll be business as usual."

Aug 12, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Replacements ready, willing and able: A longtime air industry observer says Northwest has been preparing for the union strike for 18 months. It has been aggressively hiring mechanics laid off by other airlines, and there are 1,500 replacement flight attendants ready to absorb the ramifications of a sympathy strike. There is "low customer concern about a work stoppage," said Tim Griffin, an executive vice president at Northwest. Aug 12, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Northwest gearing up for possible mechanics strike. A tense showdown between the Aircraft Mechanics Fraternal Association and management at Northwest Airlines is heating up as an Aug. 20 strike date approaches. With the union insisting it will not accept any givebacks, management at the airline has gone about recruiting possible replacement workers. "If we can't reach a deal with AMFA and they call a strike, we are confident we can operate our full schedule reliably," one Northwest executive said. Union officials claim management is trying "to bust our union." Aug 11, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Northwest uses charter company; pilots file grievance: In preparation for an expected Aug. 20 mechanics strike, Northwest Airlines used a plane and crew members from Champion Air for two scheduled flights Wednesday. Union pilots filed a grievance with officials, however, Northwest said it was allowed to use planes and pilots from the charter company as part of a contingency plan should its mechanics go on strike. Aug 11, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Northwest to hold talks with mechanics before strike. As the Aug. 19 strike deadline draws near, Northwest Airlines and the Aircraft Mechanics Fraternal Association plan to sit down to work out issues, and the Professional Flight Attendants Association said it will poll its members to determine whether it will honor picket lines. Moreover, the rift continues to widen between the International Association of Machinists and the mechanics association as accusations fly regarding pay cuts. Aug 10, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Northwest management to issue direct appeal to employees. Amid uncertainty regarding a possible strike by its mechanics union, management at Northwest Airlines is issuing a newsletter to employees stressing the importance of labor concessions to the airline's long-term financial health. "We simply must reduce labor costs by at least $1.1 billion a year, or we face a very real danger of bankruptcy," Northwest CEO Doug Steenland states in the newsletter. Aug 9, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Will other unions support Northwest's mechanics? With a strike deadline looming a little more than one week away, the mechanics union at Northwest Airlines is still unsure if other unions at the airline and in the industry will join them. "What really matters is whether the other unions at Northwest will support us. And that remains to be seen. At this stage of the game it's pretty standard for everyone to remain silent and see if a strike occurs," a mechanics union leader said.

Aug 9, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Airlines lowering luggage weights to counter fuel costs. To absorb increasing fuel costs, some U.S. airlines are issuing new regulations on international baggage. Continental lowered the per-bag luggage weight from 70 pounds to 50 pounds for coach passengers only beginning Sept. 7. Beginning Sept. 1, Northwest Airlines will lower its economy luggage weight from two bags at 70 pounds each to two bags at 50 pounds each. Aug 9, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Northwest Airlines free to train replacement flight attendants: Replacement flight attendants will continue to receive training from Northwest Airlines in case unionized employees decide to strike Aug. 20, following a federal judge's dismissal of a case claiming the training violated labor laws. The Professional Flight Attendants Association, representing almost 10,000 NWA flight attendants, plans to bring the issue to an arbitrator. Aug 8, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Northwest pilots "interested bystanders" in mechanics union talks. With an Aug. 19 deadline looming, the head of the Northwest Airlines pilots union said he hopes a deal can be struck between management and the mechanics union. "The best solution for everyone involved at Northwest is a mutually acceptable, bargained agreement," said Mark McClain, chairman of the Northwest branch of the Air Line Pilots Association. Northwest pilots already took a 15% pay cut in December and remain "interested bystanders" in the talks between the mechanics union and management. Aug 5, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Northwest's regional partners will fly through possible strike: Northwest Airlines' two regional affiliates say they will fly a full schedule even if mechanics at the larger carrier strike. Pinnacle Airlines employs non-union mechanics. However, Mesaba Airlines mechanics belong to the same union as Northwest's mechanics. Mesaba said it does not expect its mechanics to strike, but it has a contingency plan to replace them if necessary. Aug 5, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Northwest Airlines fear a August 20 strike by mechanics, cleaners and custodians, after its representatives refused to move beyond 'unacceptable' demands in a last-ditch negotiating session, called by the National Mediation Board. Unions say the airline was not prepared to negotiate and Northwest repeated its previous demand, that would require union members to approve a contract in which 53% of them would lose their jobs. Other demands already deemed non-acceptable by unions include pay cuts for remaining employees of 25-26%, along with other major concessions. http://www.nwa.com Aug 5, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Northwest talks with mechanics break down. Northwest Airlines mechanics walked away from contract talks with the company Wednesday. Northwest was seeking pay and benefit cuts worth $176 million a year, and the union said it refused to adjust its demands. A company spokesman said the airline has made several "significant offers" to the union. The workers may legally strike Aug. 20. Aug 4, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Northwest, mechanics union return to contract talks. Northwest Airlines and its mechanics union returned to contract talks Tuesday. Negotiations are set to resume Wednesday, and are expected to continue through Friday. The company's mechanics may legally strike if the two sides do not reach an agreement before an Aug. 19 deadline. Aug 3, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Northwest lines up replacement workers as possible strike looms. Northwest Airlines will use 1,000 replacement mechanics in Minneapolis and St. Paul, Detroit and Memphis if its own mechanics strike when a cooling-off period expires later this month, according to a media report. The union and the airline will continue negotiations today, but both sides are preparing for a strike. Northwest says it will operate a full schedule in the event of a strike. Aug 2, 2005

Northwest Airlines

Two airlines may time bankruptcy filings for mid-September. If Northwest Airlines and Delta Air Lines file for bankruptcy, they will likely wait until mid-September to avoid distressing workers during the business summer travel season, according to media reports. The carriers will likely file before Oct. 17, when more restrictive bankruptcy rules take effect. Aug 2, 2005

Ryanair

Ryanair has reported record first-quarter results, saying it had benefited from fuel surcharges levied by rival carriers. Net profit rose 21% to EUR64.4m for the three months to the end of June. Traffic was up 30% at 8.5m passengers, in line with a 30% increase in capacity, to leave average loads unchanged at 83% of capacity. Ryanair said fuel surcharges imposed by rivals such as British Airways, Air France and Lufthansa had made its ticket prices more competitive, increasing demand and reducing the need for it to cut fares as it had before oil costs began to soar. http://www.ryanair.com Aug 5, 2005

SkyEurope

SkyEurope, the Slovakia-based budget airline, is considering going public with listings on the Vienna and Warsaw bourses as soon as late summer, reports indicate. The three-year-old company, owned by private investors and funds, would offer between 30% and 49% of its shares, as a way to fund further expansion. The airline served 956,000 passengers last year, up from 171,410 in 2003. It operates from Bratislava, Budapest, Poland's Warsaw and Krakow and the eastern Slovak town of Kosice. http://www.skyeurope.com Aug 5, 2005

SkyTeam, Delta Air Lines, Northwest Airlines, KLM-Air France, Alitalia and Czech Airlines

Justice Department against immunity for some SkyTeam airlines. The Department of Justice recommended against granting antitrust immunity to five members of the SkyTeam airline alliance. Delta Air Lines, Northwest Airlines, KLM-Air France, Alitalia and Czech Airlines had applied for immunity. The government, however, said the carriers did not prove the benefits of immunity would outweigh the possible harm of reduced competition. The Department of Transportation will ultimately decide if the group is granted immunity. Aug 22, 2005

Southwest Airlines

Southwest capitalizing on fuel edge: Southwest Airlines' upgrades to its fuel storage and refueling systems at Baltimore-Washington International Airport may exceed its cost-saving expectations when the first phase is completed in early 2006. The carrier, which pays less than half of what its competitors do for jet-fuel, will increase its fuel storage space and cut refill times by using low-emissions hoses that tap underground pipes. Aug 23, 2005

Southwest Airlines

Soaring fuel prices push two carriers to boost prices. Southwest Airlines lifted fares by up to $4 each way to offset higher fuel prices. Meanwhile, American Airlines boosted a surcharge on fares to and from most international destinations, also to offset the higher price of jet fuel. The price of jet fuel is up about 60% from year-ago levels. Aug 17, 2005

Southwest Airlines

Wright debate could take years to resolve, lawmakers say. Texas lawmakers believe it may take years to resolve the fight over the Wright Amendment. The law limits flying out of Dallas Love Field, where Southwest Airlines operates a large hub. Southwest wants the law repealed, but American Airlines and Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport believe it should remain in place. Aug 17, 2005

Southwest Airlines

Southwest launches anti-Wright television campaign. Southwest Airlines this week unveiled a large television advertising campaign aimed at repealing the Wright Amendment. Thousands of employees also are gathering signatures for a petition requesting the law's repeal. Wright limits flying out of Dallas Love Field, where Southwest operates a large hub. American Airlines and Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport oppose changing the law. An American spokesman said the airline might launch its own campaign. Aug 3, 2005

Summer profits

Summer profits not enough to sustain most airlines. Although the summer months brought seven of the 10 airlines into the black with increased travel, some analysts say tougher months are ahead with the continued price increase of jet fuel. With no relief in site, the chief analyst for AirlineForecasts predicts fuel refinery problems eventually will lead Delta Air Lines and Northwest Airlines into bankruptcy. Aug 8, 2005

Ukranian Airlines International

Ukranian Airlines International expects passenger numbers to increase by more than a third this year, and it plans to add at least three new Boeing aircraft by the end of 2006. The airline had initially planned to boost the number of passengers to 840,000 this year from 640,000 in 2004 but revised the forecast upwards after a good start to the year. Ukrainian also plans to increase its fleet from nine, to between 12 and 14 aircraft by the end of 2006. http://www.ukraine-international.com/eng Aug 5, 2005

United Airlines

United signs 777 maintenance contract with Chinese firm. United Airlines has hired a Chinese company to maintain its fleet of 777 jetliners. The airline's five-year deal with Aircraft Maintenance and Engineering will start in October. United officials said Ameco's cost structure will lower the airline's expenses. United's 777 maintenance currently is done in the U.S. and was previously outsourced, the company said. Aug 31, 2005

United Airlines

United gets extension for filing reorganization plan. A federal bankruptcy judge extended the deadline for United Airlines to file a reorganization plan. United's exclusive right now extends until Nov. 1. The judge warned the airline that he would not grant another extension without "compelling and unforeseeable circumstances." United filed for bankruptcy almost three years ago, and it said it will file a reorganization plan next month. Aug 29, 2005

United Airlines

United workers could face taxes on notes. United Airlines plans to distribute millions of dollars in notes to its workers when it leaves bankruptcy protection, but the Internal Revenue Service is arguing the payments should be taxed as compensation. United has said taxing the payments would be unfair to the workers. The issue will go before a Chicago bankruptcy judge Friday, but it is unlikely to be resolved.

Aug 25, 2005

United Airlines

United employees get $5.25M in stock-plan lawsuit. United Airlines employees and retirees will get $5.25 million in a preliminary, partial settlement related to the failure of an employee stock-ownership plan. The workers' lawsuit sought $500 million and claimed the company stock-ownership committee and trustees did not protect the interest of the workers. The settlement amount will be recovered from the insurer for the committee. The plaintiffs have a remaining claim against State Street Bank & Trust, a trustee. State Street says it fulfilled its obligations and has not indicated it will settle, an attorney said. Aug 18, 2005

United Airlines

United faces possible setback on debt linked to jets. Creditors who owned debt on 14 of United Airlines planes say the airline owed them an additional $65 million and sold the debt to another entity. The bankrupt airline planned to buy and refinance $293 million in debt on the planes. The airline is asking a bankruptcy court to void the sale. The situation could present a setback to United as it attempts to exit bankruptcy early next year. Aug 17, 2005

United Airlines

Some United skycaps object to fee: Some United Airlines skycaps want a judge to stop the company from charging travelers at Chicago O'Hare International Airport for skycap services. The workers say the fee would violate a 1997 agreement. The company says the skycaps' claim is baseless. Aug 17, 2005

United Airlines

United gets new lease on planes. United Airlines has reached an agreement with a group of finance companies to lower leasing costs on about a quarter of the bankrupt airline's fleet. A result of drawn-out negotiations, the new agreement reduces United's lease obligations by $300 million per year. Aug 10, 2005

United Airlines

United Airlines' attempts to emerge from bankruptcy have been delayed, after creditors said they want more time to scrutinise the carrier's reorganisation plan. The airline originally hoped to exit Chapter 11 this autumn but that is not expected to happen now until late this year, or even early 2006. United said spending time ironing out details could avoid a potentially prolonged dispute later. http://www.united.com Aug 5, 2005

United Airlines

United delays filing reorganization plan. United Airlines has delayed filing a plan for leaving bankruptcy protection. The airline said its creditors committee has asked for more time to review the plan. United said it will file a reorganization plan in about one month. A spokeswoman said the airline may leave bankruptcy protection later this year or early in 2006. Aug 3, 2005

United Airlines

Investing strategy hurt United Airlines pension plan: In 1987, a fiduciary of United Airlines' pension plan discovered the company invested most of the plan's assets in the stock market, The New York Times reported. Pilot Doug Wilsman urged United to return to its practice of investing in bonds, but it continued investing in the market. The airline earlier this year defaulted on the plan, a result of the prolonged slump in the airline industry and a drop in the stock market. Lawmakers now are working to reform the pension system but are concentrating on rules covering funds put in by companies, not how the companies invest their funds. Aug 1, 2005

United Airlines

United Airlines to release reorganization plan. This week United Airlines will disclose how it will repay its creditors and return to financial stability after spending 32 months in bankruptcy protection. The airline must convince creditors its plan is viable. Some analysts say the airline must lower costs enough to survive for the long run and repair its relationship with employees, who have taken two pay cuts. Aug 1, 2005

US Airways

US Airways reaches agreement with pension agency. US Airways reached an agreement with the federal government's pension agency that will settle nearly $2.7 billion in claims related to the termination of the company's pension plan. The agreement ensures the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corp. will back US Airways' bankruptcy reorganization plan. Aug 29, 2005

US Airways

US Airways gets tax break on fuel from North Carolina. North Carolina's Legislature approved a law that will cap US Airways' state fuel taxes at $2.5 million. US Airways operates its largest hub in Charlotte. The airline said the measure is similar to ones other states have passed for their hub airlines. Aug 26, 2005

US Airways

US Airways labor leaders curious about America West team. The leaders of US Airways' labor unions are busy inquiring about the management style of their new bosses at America West Airlines. America West and US Airways in May announced plans to merge. Jose Gomez, who leads the US Airways ticket agent union in Charlotte, says so far he is encouraged by the new executive team. Aug 15, 2005

US Airways

US Airways reports Q2 loss on high fuel prices. US Airways reported a second-quarter loss of $62 million. A year ago, the airline earned $34 million. US Airways said high fuel price and sluggish revenue hurt the current quarter. Aug 1, 2005
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Publication:Airguide Online
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Aug 31, 2005
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