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Colloquy.

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DAVE MORICE has been ill but is recovering nicely. Instead of Dave's Kickshaws this month we reprint the late David Silverman's first Kickshaws. These were the original appearances of the feature.

DON HAUPTMAN writes:
    The August 2012 issue contains two items relating to my second
favorite
   subject (after wordplay, of course): the comic operas of Gilbert and
   Sullivan.
   On page 176, this phrase appears: "... set to the music of Tom
Lehrer's
   music on the chemicals."
   "The Elements" was Tom Lehrer's ingenious idea, but
not his music. He
   borrowed the tune from Arthur Sullivan. It's the melody of the
   Major-General's patter song in The Pirates of Penzance
.
   I've known and loved the work of Lehrer and G&S since
childhood, and can
   badly sing much of both from memory. To my knowledge, this is the
only
   one of Lehrer's songs for which didn't write the music as
well as the
   lyrics.
   On page 210, Dave Morice recounts a tale of his "Poetry
Cheer." But
   there's a "poetry cheer" that predates this one. By an
eerie coincidence,
   it's also from Pirates
. It's a choral piece called "Hail, Poetry!"
   At YouTube, search "hail poetry" (with or without
quotations) and a bunch
   of stage renditions will appear.
   I've been at many gatherings of Savoyards--the official term for
G&S
   enthusiasts--where there was a call for the audience to stand and
perform
   it. Like the Lehrer song cited above, this number has a musical
   distinction: It's one of only two songs in the rather large
G&S canon
   that's always done a cappella
. 


MIKE KEITH offers:

Susan asks if there are any 10-letter words with triangular progressions of the kind for which she exhibits 6-letter words. I found these, all in Webster's 3rd Unabridged:
    REVIOLATES (common difference = 9)
   SPONDYLIUM (12)
   MISSIONARY (15)
   GERUNDIVES (16) 


I note that she didn't consider words where the common difference is negative, such as USABLE, which has U=21, S+A=20, B+L+E = 19, forming an arithmetic progression with common difference -1. I found a few more 6-letter words of this type:
    YAWNED (-1)
   PIECED (-2)
   WASHED (-3)
   UNCAGE (-4)
   YARDED (-6)
   ZARIBA (-7) 


SOLOMON GOLOMB contributes:
    SOME MORE 3L OGGIES
   A one-L Poly trains some hackers;
   A two-L Polly wants her crackers;
   But I will bet a hot tamale
   There isn't any 3L Pollly.
   Chicago has a one-L El,
   They sell cloth by the two-L ell;
   But I can confidently tell
   There isn't any 3L elll.
   A one-L Dali gave us art;
   A two-L dolly's like a cart;
   But it would be the height of folly
   To try to find a 3L dollly.
   A one-L cel is in a comic;
   A two-L cell is anatomic;
   But I will state with firm insistence,
   No 3L celll is in existence. 


Challenge to readers: Try to find a 1D word and a 2D word (like ad and add) where the 3D word would suggest 3Dimensional.
    MY ULTIMATE 3L OGGIE
   A 1L CALENDER IS A PRESS,
   A 2L CALLENDER'S WHERE YOU FRESS,
   BUT IT WOULD CHALLENGE LISBET SALANDER
   TO FABRICATE A 3L CALLLENDER. 


Notes.

1) A 1L calender is a device with rollers for pressing materials (paper, cloth, etc.) into sheets. (Another meaning is "a mendicant dervish", but what rhymes with "dervish"?)

2) The 2L Callender's is a national restaurant and bakery chain, best known for its pies.

3) To "fress" (German, via Yiddish) means "to eat greedily".

4) Lisbet Salander is the resourceful title character in "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo".

5) A 3L "call-lender" could be someone who advances money over the telephone, but this requires (at least) a hyphen, and doesn't really rhyme with the other "-lender" words.

6) I didn't use the common word "calendar", Since my other words end in -"nder".
COPYRIGHT 2012 Jeremiah Farrell
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Publication:Word Ways
Article Type:Column
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Nov 1, 2012
Words:847
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